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Portal:New York City

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The New York City Portal

The Flag of New York City
The location of New York City within New York State

New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York metropolitan area, one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. A global power city, New York exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy, and has been described as the cultural capital of the world.

Founded as a trading post by colonists of the Dutch Republic in 1626, the city and its surroundings came under English control in 1664 and were renamed New York after King Charles II of England granted the lands to his brother, the Duke of York. New York served as the capital of the United States from 1785 until 1790. It has been the country's largest city since 1790. New York City consists of five boroughs, each of which is a county of New York State. The five boroughs—The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island—were consolidated into a single city in 1898. With a census-estimated 2012 population of 8,336,697 distributed over a land area of just 302.64 square miles (783.8 km2), New York is the most densely populated major city in the United States. The New York metropolitan area's population of approximately 19.8 million people remains by a significant margin the United States' largest Metropolitan Statistical Area. As many as 800 languages are spoken in New York, making it the most linguistically diverse city in the world.

Many districts and landmarks in New York City have become well known to its approximately 55 million annual visitors. Several sources have ranked New York the most photographed city in the world. Times Square, iconified as "The Crossroads of the World", is the brightly illuminated hub of the Broadway theatre district, one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections, and a major center of the world's entertainment industry. The names of many of the city's bridges, skyscrapers, and parks are known around the world. New York City's financial district, anchored by Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, has been called the world's leading financial center and is home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange by total market capitalization of its listed companies. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to America by ship in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and is a globally recognized symbol of the United States and its democracy. Manhattan's Chinatown incorporates the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere. Providing continuous 24/7 service, the New York City Subway is one of the most extensive rapid transit systems worldwide. Numerous colleges and universities in New York City, including Columbia University, New York University, and Rockefeller University, have been ranked among the top 35 in the world.

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Battle of Harlem Heights
The Battle of Harlem Heights was fought during the New York and New Jersey campaign of the American Revolutionary War. The action took place in what is now the Morningside Heights and west Harlem neighborhoods of Manhattan in New York City on September 16, 1776.

The Continental Army, under Commander-in-Chief General George Washington, Major General Nathanael Greene, and Major General Israel Putnam, totaling around 1,800 men, held a series of high ground positions in upper Manhattan against an attacking British division totaling around 5,000 men under the command of Major General Alexander Leslie. British troops made a tactical error by having their light infantry buglers sound a fox hunting call, "gone away," while in pursuit, intending to insult Washington, himself a keen fox hunter. The Continentals, who were in orderly retreat, were infuriated by this and galvanized to hold their ground. After flanking the British attackers, the Americans slowly pushed the British back. The battle went a long way to restoring the confidence of the Continental Army after suffering several defeats. It was Washington's first battlefield victory of the war.


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The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, in Central Park, New York City
Credit: Carsten Keßler

The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, more commonly known as the Central Park Reservoir, is a decommissioned reservoir in Central Park in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. The reservoir covers 106 acres (43 hectares) and holds over a billion gallons (4 million cubic meters) of water.

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President Chester A. Arthur
Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was the 21st President of the United States (1881–85); he succeeded James Garfield upon the latter's assassination. At the outset, Arthur struggled to overcome his reputation, stemming from his beginnings in politics as a politician from the New York City Republican political machine. He succeeded by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy for, and subsequent enforcement of, the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration.

Arthur grew up in upstate New York and practiced law in New York City. He served as quartermaster general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Following the Civil War, he rose in the political machine run by New York Senator Roscoe Conkling. Appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant as Collector of the Port of New York in 1871. Arthur was elected vice president in 1880, with Garfield elected president. Arthur succeeded Garfield less than a year into his presidency, and took up the cause of reform, signing the Pendleton Act into law and strongly enforcing its provisions. He vetoed the Rivers and Harbors Act that would have appropriated federal funds in a manner he thought excessive. He presided over the rebirth of the United States Navy but was criticized for failing to alleviate the federal budget surplus that had been accumulating since the end of the Civil War. Suffering from poor health, Arthur retired at the close of his term.

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Shearwater by Ellis Island

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View from the Rockefeller Center by sunset
New York City, the largest city in the United States, is home to 5,845 completed high-rises, 97 of which stand taller than 600 feet (183 m). The tallest building in New York is the One World Trade Center, which rises 1,776 feet (541 m) and was topped out on May 10, 2013. The 104-story skyscraper also stands as the tallest building in the United States, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, and the 4th-tallest building in the world. The tallest completed building in the city is the 102-story Empire State Building in Midtown Manhattan, which was finished in 1931 and rises to 1,250 feet (381 m), increased to 1,454 feet (443 m) by its antenna. It also is the fourth-tallest building in the United States and the 23rd-tallest building in the world. The Empire State Building stood as the tallest building in the world from its completion until 1972, when the 110-story North Tower of the original World Trade Center was completed. At 1,368 feet (417 m), One World Trade Center briefly held the title as the world's tallest building until the completion of the 108-story Sears Tower (now known as the Willis Tower) in Chicago in 1974. The World Trade Center towers were destroyed by terrorist attacks in 2001, and the Empire State Building regained the title of tallest building in the City. The third-tallest building in New York is the Bank of America Tower, which rises to 1,200 feet (366 m), including its spire. Tied for fourth-tallest are the 1,046-foot (319 m) Chrysler Building, which was the world's tallest building from 1930 until 1931, and the New York Times Building, which was completed in 2007.

New York City skyscrapers are concentrated in Midtown and Lower Manhattan, although other neighborhoods of Manhattan and the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens and The Bronx also have significant numbers of high-rises. As of January 2011, the entire city has 228 buildings that rise at least 500 feet (152 m) in height, including those under construction, more than any other city in the United States.

Since 2003, New York City has seen the completion of 23 buildings that rise at least 600 feet (183 m) in height. Thirteen more are under construction, including One World Trade Center, which will be the tallest building in the country when complete. One World Trade Center is part of the redevelopment of the World Trade Center, which also includes the 975-foot (297 m) 4 World Trade Center, 7 World Trade Center and the two under-construction buildings: the 1,350-foot (411 m) 2 World Trade Center and the 1,171-foot (357 m) 3 World Trade Center. Overall, as of November 2013, there were 170 high-rise buildings under construction or proposed for construction in New York City.

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History New AmsterdamCommissioners' PlanBritish occupation of New YorkEllis IslandSeptember 11, 20011993 World Trade Center bombing1939 New York World's Fair1964 New York World's FairDraft rotsBlackout of 1977Crown Heights riotTammany HallBig AppleNYC transportationNYC Subway
Geography ManhattanThe BronxBrooklynStaten IslandQueensNew York HarborHudson RiverEast RiverUpper New York BayNew York BayLower ManhattanMidtown ManhattanUpper ManhattanLong Island SoundBronx KillThe NarrowsNewark BayJamaica Bay
Buildings Empire State BuildingChrysler BuildingWorld Trade CenterGrand Central TerminalMadison Square GardenYankee StadiumCiti FieldTimes SquareSouth Street SeaportStatue of LibertyHeadquarters of the United NationsSt. Patrick's CathedralRadio City Music HallOne World Trade CenterRockefeller CenterCathedral of St. John the DivineLever HouseCarnegie HallGracie MansionCity HallPlaza HotelMacy'sPenn StationCondé Nast BuildingCitigroup CenterMetLife BuildingWoolworth BuildingTrump TowerFlatiron Building30 Rockefeller Plaza28 Liberty StreetGoldman Sachs BuildingWaldorf Astoria New York
Transport New York City SubwayIRTBMTINDStaten Island FerryNYC FerryYellow taxisGreen taxisAirTrain JFKAirTrain NewarkJFK AirportLaGuardia AirportNewark Liberty International AirportPort AuthorityNJ TransitMTAStaten Island RailwayPATHTriborough BridgeBrooklyn–Battery TunnelQueens–Midtown TunnelBronx–Whitestone BridgeThrogs Neck BridgeHolland TunnelLincoln TunnelGeorge Washington BridgeWilliamsburg BridgeManhattan BridgeBrooklyn BridgePulaski SkywayTeterboro AirportNew Jersey Turnpike
Economy New York Stock ExchangeWall StreetPort Newark–ElizabethNASDAQNYSE AmericanNew York Mercantile ExchangeNew York Board of TradeMadison AvenueFifth Avenue
Education New York UniversityColumbia UniversityCUNYCooper UnionFITFordham UniversityThe New SchoolJuilliardPace UniversityPratt InstituteSVAManhattan CollegeSt. John's University
Civic MayorNYPDFDNYOEMCity CouncilCivil CourtCriminal CourtSupreme CourtAppellate DivisionTransit AuthorityTransit PoliceHighway PatrolAuxiliary PoliceDepartment of Parks and Recreation
Culture Macy's Thanksgiving Day ParadeMetsYankeesMuseum MileThe CloistersWhitney MuseumMetropolitan Museum of ArtInternational Center of PhotographyPublic LibraryLincoln Center
Parks and grounds Central ParkBronx ZooNew York Botanical GardenConey IslandFlushing MeadowsBattery ParkProspect ParkRiverside ParkPelham Bay ParkGreenbeltHighbridge ParkBowling GreenHigh LineLiberty State
Wikipedia Books New York City

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