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Porte Saint-Martin

The Porte Saint-Martin is a Parisian monument located at the site of one of the gates of the now-destroyed fortifications of Paris. It is located at the crossing of Rue Saint-Martin, Rue du Faubourg Saint-Martin and the grands boulevards Boulevard Saint-Martin and Boulevard Saint-Denis; the Porte Saint-Martin was designed by architect Pierre Bullet at the order of Louis XIV in honor of his victories on the Rhine and in Franche-Comté. Built in 1674, it replaced a medieval gate in the city walls built by Charles V, it was restored in 1988. The Porte Saint-Martin is a rusticated triumphal arch, 18 meters high, built in limestone and marble. Recesses are occupied by bas-reliefs: North side left: La Prise du Limbourg en 1675 by Pierre Le Gros the Elder, a sitting woman next to a lion North side right: La Défaite des Allemands by Gaspard Marsy, Louis XIV as Mars carrying the shield of France and pushing back a German eagle to protect a woman and an old man South side left: La Rupture de la Triple Alliance by Étienne le Hongre, Louis XIV as Hercules nude South side right: La prise de Besançon by Martin van den Bogaert, Louis XIV dressed as Fame, standing in front of an olive tree and receiving keys from a woman Porte Saint-Denis Insecula - Porte Saint-Martin

Faith Fenton

Alice Freeman was a Canadian school teacher and investigative journalist. She became Canada's first female columnist while writing for the Toronto Empire newspaper. Freeman wrote under the pseudonym Faith Fenton to keep her job as a teacher, as journalism was seen as an unacceptably disreputable activity for a teacher to be involved in. With the low salary she earned at these jobs, she required both salaries to support herself. Fenton was the third of twelve children, was sent to live with a Bowmanville, Ontario minister and his wife when Fenton was age ten. Margaret Reike, her foster mother, ensured Fenton got an education beyond what her parents might have afforded. Fenton began her journalist career in 1886 as a Toronto correspondent for the Northern Advance, a daily newspaper in Barrie, Ontario. In 1888, she began writing a column for The Toronto Empire; the column, titled "Women's Empire", dealt with issues relevant to women of the day: sexual discrimination, sexual harassment, child abuse and wage disparity.

Fenton wrote columns at night, travelled to work as a journalist during the summer, while remaining a teacher during the day. As a writer, she interviewed famous people of the day like Susan B. Anthony, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Catherine Parr Traill, Pauline Johnson and Emma Albani, she kept her double identity secret until 1893. She became a full-time journalist; when gold was discovered in the Yukon, Fenton accompanied the Yukon Field Force's nurses to the Yukon as a correspondent for The Globe. Fenton departed Toronto in the spring. In the Yukon, Fenton married Dr. John Brown. Fenton took up residence in Dawson City and began to send reports of the gold rush back to eastern Canada, she returned to Toronto in 1904

New Caledonia blossom bat

The New Caledonia blossom bat is an uncommon species of megabat in the family Pteropodidae. The species lives in caves in northern New Caledonia, forms colonies of up to 300; the New Caledonia blossom bat is a cave roosting species, endemic to New Caledonia and is found in few caves located in Northern Grande Terre. It has on occasion been found in hollow trees, which can provide temporary roosts for the bats but are inadequate to provide for the needs of a large nursing colony; this species is presumed to forage in the tropical moist forest. The New Caledonia Blossom Bat is a nectar-feeding bat that forages for food in montane ecosystems rather than dry forest, it has been observed feeding on coconut flowers near human habitations. The species is classified as endangered by the IUCN. Threats include disturbance at roosting caves and, to a small degree, hunting. Hunting is regulated under wildlife laws. Only one recorded occurrence has been documented originating from Riviére Bleu National Park