Portuguese Workers' Communist Party

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Portuguese Workers' Communist Party/Re-Organized Movement of the Party of the Proletariat

Partido Comunista dos Trabalhadores Portugueses/Movimento Reorganizativo do Partido do Proletariado
LeaderArnaldo Matos
Founded1970
HeadquartersLisbon, Portugal
Youth wingFormerly the Marxist–Leninist Students Federation, now non-existent.
IdeologyCommunism
Marxism-Leninism
Maoism
Anti-revisionism
Political positionFar-left
International affiliationNone
ColorsRed
Assembly of the Republic
0 / 230
European Parliament
0 / 21
Regional
parliaments
0 / 104
Local
Government
0 / 2,086
Website
http://www.pctpmrpp.org

The Portuguese Workers' Communist Party/Re-Organized Movement of the Party of the Proletariat (Portuguese: Partido Comunista dos Trabalhadores Portugueses/Movimento Reorganizativo do Partido do Proletariado, PCTP/MRPP)[1] is a Maoist political party in Portugal.

History and overview[edit]

The party was founded in 1970.[2] On the ballot, its name appears as the Portuguese Workers' Communist Party, omitting the "Re-Organized" part of the name; however, its acronym remains unchanged. Its first secretary-general was Arnaldo Matos.

Originally called the "Movimento Reorganizativo do Partido do Proletariado" (MRPP), the party's political orientation has been Maoist since its foundation. In 1971, during the conservative and authoritarian dictatorship led by Marcello Caetano, the party began to publish a newspaper called Luta Popular (People's Struggle). The party was among the most active resistance movements before the Portuguese democratic revolution of 1974, especially among students in Lisbon. After the revolution, the MRPP achieved fame for its large mural paintings. The party became intensely active during 1974 and 1975. At that time, the party boasted members that later became important political figures, including José Manuel Durão Barroso and Fernando Rosas, who subsequently left the party. The party, however, never managed to elect a single MP in legislative elections.

During that revolutionary period of 1974 and 1975, the MRPP was accused by the Portuguese Communist Party of being an agent of the CIA - a belief that was fueled by co-operation between the MRPP and the Socialist Party against the communist program defended by the Portuguese Communist Party.[citation needed]

In 1976, the party changed its name to the Portuguese Workers' Communist Party, and started to use the acronym PCTP/MRPP. Its historical leaders were Arnaldo de Matos and Saldanha Sanches. The latter directed the Luta Popular newspaper.

The party's youth wing, now extinct, was the Marxist–Leninist Students Federation, to which José Manuel Durão Barroso also belonged.

The party entered a phase of internal turmoil following the 2015 legislative election, with its leader and most known figure, António Garcia Pereira, leaving the party. Details about the internal functioning of the party became difficult to obtain, since none of the official contacts answered, and even the official headquarters seems to no longer be functioning. An extraordinary congress was announced, but it is unknown if it really happened, and if so, when and where. Some sources claim the party is now operating at a clandestine level.[citation needed]

Election results[edit]

Assembly of the Republic[edit]

Election # of votes % of vote # of seats Place
1976
36,200
0.66%
0
7th
1979
53,268
0.89%
0
8th
1980
35,409
0.59%
0
11th
1983
20,995
0.37%
0
9th
1985
19,943
0.34%
0
9th
1987
20,800
0.37%
0
11th
1991
48,542
0.85%
0
7th
1995
41,137
0.70%
0
5th
1999
40,006
0.74%
0
6th
2002
36,193
0.66%
0
6th
2005
48,186
0.84%
0
6th
2009
52,761
0.93%
0
6th
2011
62,610
1.12%
0
6th
2015
59,812
1.13%
0
8th

European Parliament[edit]

Election # of votes % of vote # of seats Place
1987
19,475
0.35%
0
12th
1989
26,682
0.64%
0
10th
1994
24,022
0.79%
0
5th
1999
30,446
0.88%
0
6th
2004
36,294
1.07%
0
5th
2009
42,940
1.20%
0
7th
2014
54,708
1.67%
0
8th

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ It is pronounced [pɐɾˈtidu kumuˈniʃtɐ duʃ tɾɐbɐʎɐˈdoɾɨʃ puɾtuˈɡezɨʃ / muviˈmẽtu ʁiɔɾɡɐnizɐˈtivu du pɐɾˈtidu du pɾulɨtɐɾiˈadu].
  2. ^ "Political Parties in Portugal". Translation Company Group. Retrieved 15 June 2016.

External links[edit]