Potassium canrenoate

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Potassium canrenoate
Potassium canrenoate.svg
Clinical data
Synonyms SC-14266
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
ATC code
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolism Hepatic
Excretion Renal and fecal
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.016.868 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
Formula C22H29KO4
Molar mass 396.5616 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)
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Potassium canrenoate (INN, JAN) or canrenoate potassium (USAN) (brand names Venactone, Soldactone), also known as aldadiene kalium,[1] the potassium salt of canrenoic acid, is an aldosterone antagonist of the spirolactone group.[2] Like spironolactone, it is a prodrug, and is metabolized to active canrenone in the body.[3][4]

Potassium canrenoate is notable in that it is the only clinically used antimineralocorticoid which is available for parenteral administration (specifically intravenous)[4][5] as opposed to oral administration.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hans Selye (17 April 2013). Hormones and Resistance: Part 1 and. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 186–. ISBN 978-3-642-65192-2. 
  2. ^ R.A. Hill; H.L.J. Makin; D.N. Kirk; G.M. Murphy (23 May 1991). Dictionary of Steroids. CRC Press. pp. 656–. ISBN 978-0-412-27060-4. 
  3. ^ Alfred Burger; Manfred E. Wolff (1996). Burger's Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Discovery: Therapeutic agents. Wiley. ISBN 978-0-471-57557-3. 
  4. ^ a b Carl Waldmann; Neil Soni; Andrew Rhodes (27 November 2008). Oxford Desk Reference: Critical Care. OUP Oxford. pp. 187–. ISBN 978-0-19-922958-1. 
  5. ^ H. Jaap Bonjer (21 June 2017). Surgical Principles of Minimally Invasive Procedures: Manual of the European Association of Endoscopic Surgery (EAES). Springer. pp. 136–. ISBN 978-3-319-43196-3. 
  6. ^ Kolkhof P, Bärfacker L (2017). "30 YEARS OF THE MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR: Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists: 60 years of research and development". J. Endocrinol. 234 (1): T125–T140. doi:10.1530/JOE-16-0600. PMC 5488394Freely accessible. PMID 28634268.