Pozo de El Salvador

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The Pozo de El Salvador are basements and a well located in the city of Toledo, in Castile-La Mancha, Spain. They are located in the Plaza del Salvador, between the church of El Salvador and the convent building of San Marcos, 220 m from the Cathedral, with direct connection from the street of Trinidad convent building of San Marcos.[1]

In the year 1997, The City Council excavated and discovered stone stairs, which are located in front of the iron stairs. Archaeological work began thus, appearing two more rooms.

In the third of them they discovered a well that, surprisingly, still contains water today. It is both well, because it emanates water of itself and also cistern as it receives rainwater through 3 holes in the roof. The water that fell here was transferred by three channels to the well. It is believed that this cistern-well was blocked in its day and remained hidden since for centuries the water was a precious commodity in Toledo. It traded with it through the water carriers. Only the wealthy classes could buy clean water. The rest drank from the contaminated streams that flowed into the Tagus. They tried to purify the water by filtering it through pots of clay and boiling it.

The basement consists of two rooms: "Entry" and "Main room".

Chronology[edit]

With respect to the historical description, it can only be noted that a superposition of the ruins of the square of El Salvador has been graphically made with the Plan of city of Ibáñez Ibero of 1882, where they appear the traces of the old convent of San Marcos, built in the 16th century. In this plane do not appear data that evidences the belonging of the present ruins to that convent. Its chronology can be placed then between the 12th and 13th centuries, previous to the cloister of the convent of Trinitarios that it extended by the square.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ consorciotoledo.org. "POZO DEL SALVADOR". 
  2. ^ Consorcio de Toledo. Rutas Patrimonio Desconocido (PDF). pp. 22, 23. 

External links[edit]