Principality of Freedonia

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Principality of Freedonia
Micronation
Flag of Freedonia
Flag
Motto: Superibimus!
Location None
Official languages English
Demonym Freedonian
Organizational structure Constitutional monarchy
• Prince
John I (1997-2004)
Establishment
• Declared
1997
Membership < 300 (1997-2004)
Purported currency Freedonian Dollar (based on precious metals)

The Principality of Freedonia was a micronation based on libertarian principles. It was created as a "hypothetical project" by a group of teenagers in the United States in 1992, the project was formalized as a new country project in 1997, which included attempts in 2001 to lease territory in Somaliland. The attempt to lease land was rejected.

It was headed by a Texas university student named John Kyle, who uses the title Prince John,[1][2] the Principality of Freedonia itself was based in Boston, Massachusetts.[3]

Coinage[edit]

While the Freedonia project was active, it minted its own currency,[3] it had a number of 50 Freedonian dollar 1 oz silver coins minted.[4] It offered these coins for sale on the organization's website.[5]

Current status[edit]

The Freedonia project's website has not been updated for a number of years and its discussion forum no longer functions, email communication with the self-styled Prince does not work, and the entire project appears to be defunct. E-mail statements from the founder indicate that the project is not being actively pursued as of 2004.[4]

As of 2013, the Freedonia Web site is no longer available.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lonely Planet Micronations, John Ryan, George Dunford, and Simon Sellars, Lonely Planet Publications, ISBN 1741047307 (paperback)
  2. ^ "Wanted: Homeland for 300 Webheads". Metroactive. 22 November 2000. Retrieved 2 January 2006. 
  3. ^ a b Blumberg, Alex. "It's Good to Be King". Wired. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  4. ^ "Bank of Freedonia". The Principality of Freedonia. Archived from the original on 20 August 2012. Retrieved 2 January 2006. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]