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Quotation

A quotation is the representation of an utterance, introduced by a verb of saying. For example: John said: "I saw Mary today". Quotations are used to present well-knowns statements part that are explicitly attributed by citation to their original source. A quotation can refer to the repeated use of units of any other form of expression parts of artistic works: elements of a painting, scenes from a movie or sections from a musical composition. Quotations are used for a variety of reasons: to illuminate the meaning or to support the arguments of the work in which it is being quoted, to provide direct information about the work being quoted, to pay homage to the original work or author, to make the user of the quotation seem well-read, and/or to comply with copyright law. Quotations are commonly printed as a means of inspiration and to invoke philosophical thoughts from the reader. Pragmatically speaking, quotations can be used as language games to manipulate social order and the structure of society.

Famous quotations are collected in books that are sometimes called quotation dictionaries or treasuries. Of these, Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations, The Yale Book of Quotations and The Macmillan Book of Proverbs and Famous Phrases are considered among the most reliable and comprehensive sources. Diaries and calendars include quotations for entertainment or inspirational purposes, small, dedicated sections in newspapers and weekly magazines—with recent quotations by leading personalities on current topics—have become commonplace. Many quotations are incorrect or attributed to the wrong authors, quotations from obscure or unknown writers are attributed to far more famous writers. Examples of this are Winston Churchill, to whom many political quotations of uncertain origin are attributed, Oscar Wilde, to whom anonymous humorous quotations are sometimes attributed; the Star Trek catchphrase "Beam me Scotty" did not appear in that form in the original series.

Other misquotations include "Just the facts, ma'am", "Heavy lies the crown" from Shakespeare's Play Henry IV, Part 2, "Elementary, my dear Watson", "Luke, I am your father", "Play it again, Sam", "Do you feel lucky, punk?" and "We don't need no stinkin' badges!"

Holgate, Ohio

Holgate is a village in Henry County, United States. The population was 1,109 at the 2010 census. Holgate known as Kaufmanville, was platted in 1873 when the railroad was extended to that point and incorporated as a village in 1881; the village has the name of the original owner of the town site. A post office has been in operation since 1874. Holgate is located at 41°15′3″N 84°7′57″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.15 square miles, all land. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,109 people, 408 households, 292 families living in the village; the population density was 964.3 inhabitants per square mile. There were 460 housing units at an average density of 400.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the village was 90.2% White, 0.6% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 7.0% from other races, 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 19.0% of the population. There were 408 households of which 36.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 15.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, 28.4% were non-families.

25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.07. The median age in the village was 38 years. 27.1% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the village was 51.3 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,194 people, 441 households, 310 families living in the village; the population density was 1,218.7 people per square mile. There were 464 housing units at an average density of 473.6 per square mile. The racial makeup of the village was 91.37% White, 0.08% African American, 1.09% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 6.45% from other races, 0.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.59% of the population. There were 441 households out of which 40.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.5% were non-families.

25.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.17. In the village, the population was spread out with 29.6% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 18.3% from 45 to 64, 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.3 males. The median income for a household in the village was $35,729, the median income for a family was $45,208. Males had a median income of $35,278 versus $21,618 for females; the per capita income for the village was $16,187. About 7.7% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.7% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over. Public education for the village is administered by the Holgate Local School District. Joe E. Brown, actor Alene Duerk, first female Admiral in US Navy, Holgate High School graduate Pete Fahrer, professional baseball player https://www.toledoblade.com/sports/high-school/2004/03/28/Holy-Holgate/stories/200403280010

Biff Brewster

Biff Brewster is the central character in a series of 13 adventure and mystery novels for adolescent boys written by Andy Adams. The series was published by Grosset & Dunlap between 1960 and 1965. Most titles were published in hardcover with full color dustjackets, like other Grosset & Dunlap juvenile series of the era, production costs were cut by dispensing with the dust jackets and featuring full color cover illustrations in their stead; this occurred only with the last three books in the series, reprints of the first three. The series follows Bruce "Biff" Brewster, a well-built, athletic sixteen-year-old who pursues adventure and mystery abroad with his father, Thomas Brewster, a former lieutenant in the United States Navy and, in the series, chief field engineer for the Ajax Mining Company; the series is distinguished for drawing on exotic locations as backgrounds. The series was published in British editions; some of the novels available on Project Gutenberg and LibriVox. Brazilian Gold Mine Mystery Mystery of the Chinese Ring Hawaiian Sea Hunt Mystery Mystery of the Mexican Treasure African Ivory Mystery Alaska Ghost Glacier Mystery Mystery of the Ambush in India Mystery of the Caribbean Pearls Egyptian Scarab Mystery Mystery of the Tibetan Caravan British Spy Ring Mystery Mystery of the Arabian Stallion Mystery of the Alpine Pass Biff Brewster: Leading protagonist Children and Young Adult Literature portal