R. K. Films

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R.K. Films
आर.के. फिल्म्स
Industry Films
Founded 1945
Headquarters Chembur, Mumbai, India
Products Movies, Tech Shows
Owner Rishi Kapoor

R. K. Films (Hindi: आर.के. फिल्म्स) is a film production company, based in R. K. Studio (Hindi: आर.के. स्टूडियो), a film studio both established by and named after the Bollywood actor Raj Kapoor,[1] headquartered at Chembur, Mumbai. It was founded in 1948, one year after India gained independence. It had a rough start, as its first movie, Aag (1948) did not perform well at the box office. Most of the R.K. Films productions share a common theme of criticising society and depicting love across social divide

History[edit]

R.K. Film and R. K. Studio entrance, Chembur, Mumbai

R.K. Films was formed in 1948, by Raj Kapoor in Chembur, Mumbai.[2]

After the commercial failure of the studio's first venture, Aag (1948), it found success with Barsaat (1949). After this success, the company's logo was drawn to imitate the poster of Barsaat. Successful films such as Awaara (1951), Boot Polish, Jagte Raho and Shri 420 followed. Awaara was particularly successful, not just in India, but all over the world. Many R.K. Films movies featured Kapoor opposite actress Nargis. Kapoor appeared in 15 R.K. films with Nargis and travelled around the world with her to promote the studio's films. The music team of Shankar Jaikishan also worked frequently on R.K. Films productions during this period.[3] Starting with Awaara (1951), Radhu Karmakar shot all of Raj Kapoor's subsequent films for four decades, till his last, Ram Teri Ganga Maili (1985).[4]

R.K. Films produced many films in the next few decades, including Jis Desh Men Ganga Behti Hai (1960), Mera Naam Joker (1970), Bobby (1973), Satyam Shivam Sundaram (1978), Prem Rog (1982) and Ram Teri Ganga Maili (1985), Raj Kapoor's last film. In the 1970s, Randhir Kapoor joined his father at the studio, and made his acting and directorial debut with Kal Aaj Aur Kal in 1971, which also starred his future wife Babita, father Raj Kapoor and grandfather Prithviraj Kapoor. He went on to direct two more films with the company Dharam Karam (1975) and an incomplete film left Raj Kapoor which he completed after his father's death in 1988 Henna (1991). His brother Shashi Kapoor also appeared in several R.K. films. When Raj Kapoor died in 1988 Randhir took over the studio. His younger brother Rajiv Kapoor directed PremGranth in 1996; Rishi Kapoor directed Aa Ab Laut Chalen (1999). Herafter the Kapoors have produced no more films under the R.K. Films banner.[5]

Unlike other Bollywood studios of the time period, R.K. Films was able to preserve all the costumes used in its films.[2]

On 16 September 2017, RK studio has caught fire and collapsed as of now. A massive fire broke out in the studio during the shoot of a television reality show and the studio was engulfed in fire.

Filmography[edit]

Title Year Director Ref.
Aag 1948 [6]
Barsaat 1949 [7]
Awaara 1951 [8]
Aah 1953
Boot Polish 1954 [9]
Shree 420 1955 [10]
Jagte Raho 1956 [11]
Ab Dilli Dur Nahin 1957 [12]
Jis Desh Men Ganga Behti Hai 1960 [13]
Sangam 1964
Mera Naam Joker 1970
Kal Aaj Aur Kal 1971
Bobby 1973
Dharam Karam 1975 [14]
Satyam Shivam Sundaram 1978 [15]
Biwi O Biwi 1981 [16]
Prem Rog 1982 [17]
Ram Teri Ganga Maili 1985 [18]
Henna 1991 [19]
PremGranth 1996 [20]
Aa Ab Laut Chalen 1999 [21]

Awards[edit]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
1955 Shree 420[22] National Film Award for Best Feature Film in Hindi Won
1956 Ek Din Ratre[23] National Film Award for Best Feature Film in Bengali Won
1955 Boot Polish Filmfare Award for Best Film Won
1962 Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hai Won
1986 Ram Teri Ganga Maili Won
1983 Prem Rog Nominated

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Singh, Kushwant (6 November 1976). "Screen-Struck India". The Emporia Gazette. p. 2. Retrieved 8 December 2014 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  2. ^ a b Bollywood: A History by Mihir Bose, Tempus, 2006, 0752428357
  3. ^ Cinema India by Divia Patel, Rutgers University Press, 2002, 0813531756.
  4. ^ "Memories through a lens". The Hindu. 6 June 2008. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  5. ^ "Randhir Kapoor keen to revive RK Films banner". The Times of India. The Times Group. 19 July 2013. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  6. ^ "Aag (1948)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  7. ^ "Barsaat (1949)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  8. ^ "Awara (1951)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  9. ^ "Boot Polish (1954)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  10. ^ "Shree 420 (1955)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  11. ^ "Jagte Raho (1956)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  12. ^ "Ab Dilli Door Nahin (1957)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  13. ^ "Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hai (1961)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  14. ^ "Dharam Karam (1975)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  15. ^ "Satyam Shivam Sundaram (1978)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  16. ^ "Biwi-O-Biwi (1981)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  17. ^ "Prem Rog (1982)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  18. ^ "Ram Teri Ganga Maili (1985)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  19. ^ "Henna (1991)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  20. ^ "Prem Granth (1996)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  21. ^ "Aa Ab Laut Chalen (1999)". Bollywood Hungama. Retrieved 8 August 2014. 
  22. ^ "3rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 1 September 2011. 
  23. ^ "4th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 2 September 2011. 

External links[edit]