RCAF Station Dauphin

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RCAF Station Dauphin
Rural Municipality of Dauphin, Manitoba
Near Dauphin, Manitoba in Canada
RCAF Station Dauphin is located in Manitoba
RCAF Station Dauphin
RCAF Station Dauphin
Coordinates51°06′N 100°03′W / 51.100°N 100.050°W / 51.100; -100.050Coordinates: 51°06′N 100°03′W / 51.100°N 100.050°W / 51.100; -100.050
Site information
OperatorFormerly Royal Canadian Air Force
Site history
Built byP.W. Graham & Sons
In use1941-5
FateConverted to civilian airport
Garrison information
OccupantsNo. 10 Service Flying Training School(S.F.T.S.) (1941-1945)
Airfield information
IdentifiersIATA: none, ICAO: none
Elevation990 ft (300 m) AMSL
Runways
Direction Length and surface
14L/32R 2,700 ft (820 m) Hard Surface
14R/32L 2,700 ft (820 m) Hard Surface
2L/26R 2,610 ft (800 m) Hard Surface
2R/26L 2,610 ft (800 m) Hard Surface
8L/26R 2,720 ft (830 m) Hard Surface
8R/26L 2,720 ft (830 m) Hard Surface
Airfields

RCAF Station Dauphin was a Second World War British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) station located near Dauphin, Manitoba, Canada. It was operated and administered by the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF); the Station was home to No. 10 Service Flying Training School(S.F.T.S.) from 5 Mar 1941-14 Apr 1945.[1]

The aerodrome is now the Lt. Col W.G. (Billy) Barker VC Airport.

History[edit]

A site was selected for construction of a training aerodrome south of the community of Dauphin, Manitoba; the total cost of construction of the facility was approximately one million dollars. Building construction was completed by P.W. Graham & Sons, of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan for $337,214 and plumbing work at the site was completed by F.W. Bumstead of Dauphin for $50,000. No. 10 Service Flying Training School was established at the base on 5 March 1941, but the official opening of the school was not held until 15 April of the same year. [2] The school was disbanded on 15 April 1945 and the airport was decommissioned by the RCAF after the war.


Aerodrome data[edit]

In approximately 1942 the aerodrome was listed as RCAF Aerodrome - Dauphin, Manitoba at 51°06′N 100°03′W / 51.100°N 100.050°W / 51.100; -100.050 with a variation of 14 degrees east and elevation of 990 ft (300 m). Six runways were listed as follows:[3]

Runway Name Length Width Surface
14L/32R 2,700 ft (820 m) 100 ft (30 m) Hard surfaced
14R/32L 2,700 ft (820 m) 100 ft (30 m) Hard surfaced
2L/20R 2,610 ft (800 m) 100 ft (30 m) Hard surfaced
2R/20L 2,610 ft (800 m) 100 ft (30 m) Hard surfaced
8L/26R 2,720 ft (830 m) 100 ft (30 m) Hard surfaced
8R/26L 2,720 ft (830 m) 100 ft (30 m) Hard surfaced

Relief Landing Field - Valley River[edit]

In approximately 1942 the aerodrome was listed as RCAF Aerodrome - Valley River, Manitoba at 51°13′N 100°13′W / 51.217°N 100.217°W / 51.217; -100.217 with a variation of 14 degrees east and elevation of 1,018 ft (310 m). The field is listed as an "All way field" with three runways as follows: [4]

Runway Name Length Width Surface
2/20 3,400 ft (1,000 m) ---- Turf
13/31 3,400 ft (1,000 m) ---- Turf
8/26 3,400 ft (1,000 m) ---- Turf

Relief Landing Field - North Junction[edit]

In approximately 1942 the aerodrome was listed as RCAF Aerodrome - North Junction, Manitoba at 51°13′N 100°05′W / 51.217°N 100.083°W / 51.217; -100.083 with a variation of 14 degrees east and elevation of 980 ft (300 m). The field is listed as an "All way field" with three runways as follows: [5]

Runway Name Length Width Surface
8/26 3,030 ft (920 m) 1,000 ft (300 m) Turf
1/19 2,910 ft (890 m) 1,000 ft (300 m) Turf
13/31 2,940 ft (900 m) 1,000 ft (300 m) Turf

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hatch, F. J. (1983). The Aerodrome of Democracy: Canada and the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, 1939-1945. Ottawa: Directorate of History, Department of National Defence. ISBN 0660114437.
  2. ^ Kramer, Nathan; Goldsborough, Gordon. "Service Flying Training School No. 10". Retrieved 1 Feb 2019.
  3. ^ Staff writer (c. 1942). Pilots Handbook of Aerodromes and Seaplane Bases Vol. 2. Royal Canadian Air Force. p. 5.
  4. ^ Staff writer (c. 1942). Pilots Handbook of Aerodromes and Seaplane Bases Vol. 2. Royal Canadian Air Force. p. 24.
  5. ^ Staff writer (c. 1942). Pilots Handbook of Aerodromes and Seaplane Bases Vol. 2. Royal Canadian Air Force. p. 15.

External links[edit]