Rachel Nichols (journalist)

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Rachel Nichols
Born
Rachel Michele Alexander

(1973-10-18) October 18, 1973 (age 45)
Other namesRachel Francis
Alma materNorthwestern University
Notable credit(s)
NBA on TNT
Unguarded with Rachel Nichols
SportsCenter
Monday Night Football
Monday Night Countdown
Sunday NFL Countdown
E:60
The Jump
Spouse(s)Max Nichols (2001–present)
Children2

Rachel Michele Nichols (née Alexander, born October 18, 1973) is a sports journalist who is currently an ESPN television host, sports reporter, and anchor. She currently hosts The Jump, a daily NBA discussion/debate show, weekdays on ESPN.

Early life[edit]

Nichols was born Rachel Michele Alexander, to a Jewish family,[1] the daughter of Jane and Ronald Jacobs,[2] she is a 1991 graduate of Winston Churchill High School in Potomac, Maryland[3] and graduated from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in 1995.[4]

Career[edit]

Nichols began her career as a sportswriter in the 1990s, writing for the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel (1995–1996) and Washington Post (1996–2004), where she covered the NHL's Washington Capitals,[5] she joined ESPN in 2004, where she became a regular part of SportsCenter, Sunday NFL Countdown and Monday Night Countdown, as well as a regular on the network's NFL and NBA coverage.[6][7] Nichols was also a correspondent for E:60[8] and worked as the sideline reporter on a number of Monday Night Football broadcasts.[9]

She left ESPN for CNN in 2013, and started hosting Unguarded with Rachel Nichols in October of that year; the program was changed from a regular series to occasional special in October 2014.[10] Sports Illustrated has called Nichols "the country's most impactful and prominent female sports journalist."[11] She earned widespread praise for her tough questioning of NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in the wake of the Ray Rice scandal [12] and for confronting boxer Floyd Mayweather on his history of domestic violence.[13]

Nichols returned to ESPN in 2016 and created The Jump, a daily show covering the NBA, which she has co-hosted since,[7][14] she also became a recurring guest-host on Pardon My Take and the Pardon the Interruption (a.k.a. PTI) TV show and podcast (2016–present).[15]

Accolades[edit]

She has been named one of Esquire's "Women We Love"[16] and one of The Hollywood Reporter's "10 Most Powerful Voices in Sports Media".[17] She was also named to Sports Illustrated's "Twitter 100" in 2013 and 2014[18][19] and to Sports Illustrated "MMQB 100".[20]

Personal life[edit]

Nichols married film and music video director Max Nichols,[21] son of film and stage director Mike Nichols, in a Jewish ceremony in Venice in 2001.[2] Together, they have two children, twin daughters.[22][23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tampa Jewish Federation: "Jews in the News: Mike Nichols, Yael Grobglas and Dominic Fumusa" retrieved March 18, 2017. "Max Nichols is a leading music business executive. In 2001, he married Jewish journalist RACHEL ALEXANDER, now 40, in a Jewish rabbinical ceremony in Venice, Italy. Alexander was then a sportswriter for the Washington Post, she took her husband's name and now is a prominent ESPN/CNN TV sportscaster under the name Rachel Nichols."
  2. ^ a b "Weddings; Rachel Alexander, Max Nichols". The New York Times. May 27, 2001. Retrieved June 15, 2008.
  3. ^ "Rachel Nichols: WCHS '91 alumni". Retrieved June 28, 2012.
  4. ^ "Rachel Nichols Northwestern alumni". Retrieved June 28, 2012.
  5. ^ "Rachel Alexander". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 15, 2008.
  6. ^ Hiestand, Michael (January 24, 2013). "Rachel Nichols leaving ESPN for CNN". USA Today.
  7. ^ a b Spanberg, Erik (March 25, 2019). "ESPN's Rachel Nichols asks the tough questions". www.bizjournals.com. Retrieved April 29, 2019.
  8. ^ "Rachel Nichols: Reporter and E:60 Correspondent". MediaZone (biography). ESPN. March 7, 2010. Archived from the original on August 16, 2011. Retrieved May 31, 2011.
  9. ^ "Anchors and Reporters: Rachel Nichols". CNN. Retrieved November 1, 2013.
  10. ^ "'Unguarded with Rachel Nichols' will only air as specials after Turner shakeup". USA Today.
  11. ^ "The Case for ... Rachel Nichols". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  12. ^ "Rachel Nichols refused to let Roger Goodell off the hook". USA Today. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  13. ^ "CNN's Rachel Nichols Confronts Floyd Mayweather over Domestic Abuse Charges". Mediaite. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  14. ^ Bechtel, Mark. "How The Jump became TV's smartest basketball show". SI.com. Retrieved April 29, 2019.
  15. ^ "Nichols teams with Post mentors Wilbon, Kornheiser on PTI - ESPN Front Row". July 28, 2016. Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  16. ^ "The Esquire Survey: The Sexiest Women on the Planet". Esquire. November 1, 2005. Archived from the original on May 8, 2008. Retrieved June 15, 2008.
  17. ^ "The 10 Most Powerful Voices in Sports Media: Simmons, Barkley and More". The Hollywood Reporter.
  18. ^ "The Twitter 100". Sports Illustrated. September 25, 2013. Retrieved November 1, 2013.
  19. ^ "The Twitter 100". Sports Illustrated. November 4, 2014. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  20. ^ "The MMQB 100". Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  21. ^ "Helmer has 'Two Night Stand'". Variety. Retrieved November 1, 2013.
  22. ^ Rosen, Rick. "Max Nichols, Rachel Nichols Husband: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know". heavy. Retrieved December 1, 2017.
  23. ^ Shister, Gail. "Hard-Nosed Sports Reporter, Still Hit On in the Locker Room, Gets CNN Back in the Game". TVNewser. Retrieved December 1, 2017.