Reformation Study Bible

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The Reformation Study Bible is a study Bible published by Ligonier Ministries, the most recent edition (2015) is published in the English Standard Version and the New King James Version. Dr. R. C. Sproul is the general editor and author of the theological notes.

The Reformation Study Bible was first begun in 1988 as an attempt to create a modern Geneva Bible with study notes done in the Reformed tradition, the New International Version was to be used. However, when the publishing was taken over by Thomas Nelson, the translation was switched to the New King James Version; in 1995 the New Geneva Study Bible was released; the name was changed in 1998 to The Reformation Study Bible. In 2005, the Bible version used was changed to the English Standard Version.

As of early 2015 a fully revised and edited version of the Reformation Study Bible was released by Reformation Trust publishing[1] which is owned and operated by Ligonier Ministries, the notes were expanded into a three column format and the theological and doctrinal content was updated. An additional resource was added to the back of this Bible that contains the Creeds, Catechisms and Doctrinal documents that are common to Protestant Reformed fellowships.

On February 25, 2016, Reformation Trust Publishing released the RSB with the New King James Version due to popular demand.[2] Ligioner lists R.C. Sproul, James M. Boice, Edmund Clowney, Sean Michael Lucas, Keith A. Mathison, L. Michael Morales, Stephen J. Nichols, Roger Nicole, J.I. Packer, Burk Parsons, et al. as primary editors of the 2015/2016 editions of the RSB.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Publishing, Reformation Trust. "Reformation Trust Publishing". 
  2. ^ Ministries, Ligioner. "Reformation Study Bible NKJV 2016". www.ligioner.org. Reformation Trust Publishing. Retrieved 13 January 2016. 
  3. ^ Ministries, Ligioner. "Reformation Study Bible". Reformation Study Bible. Reformation Trust Publishing. Retrieved 13 January 2016. 

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