Robert Maunsell

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Robert Maunsell
Born(1810-10-24)24 October 1810
Milford, near Limerick, Ireland
Died19 April 1894(1894-04-19) (aged 83)
NationalityIrish
OccupationMissionary
Spouse(s)Susan Cherry Pigott

Robert Maunsell (24 October 1810 – 19 April 1894) was a New Zealand missionary, linguist and translator. He was born in Milford, near Limerick, Ireland on 24 October 1810.[1][2]

Robert Maunsell joined the Church Missionary Society and arrived in the Bay of Islands in 1835 and was appointed to Te Waimate mission,[3] and he was sent to established the Manukau mission station that same year;[4] where he operated a school.[5][6] From 1849 to 1865 he worked at Te Kohanga Mission near Port Waikato,[7][8][9] including during the Invasion of the Waikato, which was the response of the colonial government to the Kingitanga Movement.[10]

After 1844 the Rev. Robert Maunsell worked with William Williams on the revision of the translation of the Bible into the Māori language.[11][12] William Williams concentrated on the revision of the New Testament; Maunsell worked on the revision of the Old Testament, portions of which were published in 1840 with the full translation completed in 1857.[3][4]

In 1845 the Book of Common Prayer was translated by a committee comprising William Williams, Robert Maunsell, James Hamlin and William Puckey.[13]

He was Archdeacon of Waitemata from 1868 to 1870;[14] and then Archdeacon of Auckland until 1883.

He died on 19 April 1894 at Parnell, New Zealand.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Nathan, Judith Morrell. "Robert Maunsell". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 1 December 2011.
  2. ^ "Blain Biographical Directory of Anglican clergy in the South Pacific" (PDF). 2015. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  3. ^ a b Transcribed by the Right Reverend Dr. Terry Brown Bishop of Malaita, Church of the Province of Melanesia, 2008 (10 November 1858). "Untitled article on Maori Bible translation". The Church Journal, New-York. Retrieved 30 November 2014.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ a b Rogers, Lawrence M. (1973). Te Wiremu: A Biography of Henry Williams. Pegasus Press.
  5. ^ "The Church Missionary Gleaner, September 1847". Death of a Pious Child in New Zealand. Adam Matthew Digital. Retrieved 16 October 2015.
  6. ^ "The Church Missionary Gleaner, April 1852". Native Institution at Waikato Heads (part 1). Adam Matthew Digital. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  7. ^ "The Church Missionary Gleaner, March 1853". Native Traits and Gospel Influence. Adam Matthew Digital. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  8. ^ "The Church Missionary Gleaner, June 1853". The Native Institution at Waikato Heads (part 2). Adam Matthew Digital. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  9. ^ "The Church Missionary Gleaner, October 1859". United Meeting of the Schools in the Waikato District. Adam Matthew Digital. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  10. ^ "The Church Missionary Gleaner, March 1864". The War in New Zealand. Adam Matthew Digital. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  11. ^ Williams, William (1974). The Turanga journals, 1840–1850. F. Porter (Ed) Wellington. p. 44.
  12. ^ Williams, William (1974). The Turanga journals, 1840–1850. F. Porter (Ed). p. 314.
  13. ^ "New Zealand Mission". Missionary Register. 1845. pp. 364–373. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  14. ^ TEARA

External links[edit]