Roseville (NSW) collision (1950)

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The Roseville (New South Wales) collision was a railway collision in Australia of the "signal at danger tripped past in accordance to the rules" type.

On the morning of the 29th July 1950, trains were "running late and out of timetable order." The train driven by Driver Barrett found the departure signal at Roseville railway station at stop (red), and in accordance with the rules "tripped" past the train stop. However he went too fast, and the train ran into the rear of a stationary train ahead. Shortly after this a third train, approaching round a curve from the opposite direction, collided with the wreckage.

Description[edit]

Guard Cross was in a guard's only compartment in the second-last car of his eight-car train, this car was a trailer, which had no speedometer. [1]

Speed[edit]

The train is said to have reached a speed of 40 miles per hour after tripping past. [2] This is too fast, the normal speed on the line was 50 miles per hour.

In one report Driver Barrett said that he was doing 15 miles per hour after tripping past. [3]

Emergency Brake[edit]

Carriages fitted with continuous air (or vacuum) brakes usually have a valve in each car whereby the brakes may be applied in an emergency. One such occasion was also at Roseville on 1908 when the guard fell off the train and a passenger applied the brakes. Penalty notices warn against improper usage. [4]

Illness[edit]

Driver Barrett reported that he had a coughing fit after tripping past the red signal, and that he had thus been distracted.

One report outlined this problem in more detail, the driver had been on sick leave, and this was his first day back on duty. He said he had been coughing all the way from Wynyard, eight stations away. [5] He blamed the coughing for the accident.

Duties of Guard[edit]

In Great Britain, Guards of trains are quite prepared to take action (apply the emergency brakes as in the Norton Fitzwarren accident (1940). It's a tradition in their culture. If they had train-stops in Great Britain, the applying the brakes if the train is going too fast after tripping past a red signal would come naturally too.

Responsibility[edit]

Driver Barnett accepted full responsibility for the accident. [6]

Of the six train crew involved, the Board of Inquiry absolves five, including Guard Cross, and except for Driver Berrett. [7]

Injuries[edit]

All three trains were lightly loaded, so that only 12 passengers were injured, the two down trains were in the counter-peak direction, while the up train in the peak direction had just left at Lindfield on platform 2, the terminating platform, with most up passengers waiting on platform 1. [8]

Other reports say that 11 people were injured. [9] [10]

Carriages[edit]

In the 1950s, single deck trains, consisting of two sets of four cars (totalling 8 cars in all), often had 1 wooden car per 4 car car set, the rest of the set were steel cars and steel cars tend to be strong than wooden cars in a collision.

In the 1950s, the guard's position in the train varied, it could be in a trailer car as car 6 or 7, a steel car with no speedometer on view, or in car 4 or 5, a steel or wooden car, which may or may not have a speedometer on view. The guard would have always have access to the air brakes which could stop the train.

Board of Inquiry[edit]

The Board of Inquiry consisted of 3 men: [11]

Prevention[edit]

No departmental inquiry was held as "the cause of the accident was already known." One newspaper at least asks what steps will be taken to prevent similar accidents. [12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rail chief tells of official report on triple train smash". The Sun (12658). New South Wales, Australia. 23 August 1950. p. 2 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved 17 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  2. ^ "Train smash at 40 mph-- says rail officer". The Sun (12659). New South Wales, Australia. 24 August 1950. p. 2 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved 17 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  3. ^ "Driver's cough smash "cause"". The Sun (12660). New South Wales, Australia. 25 August 1950. p. 9 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved 18 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  4. ^ "RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT ARTARMON". Evening News (12,834). New South Wales, Australia. 28 July 1908. p. 2. Retrieved 20 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  5. ^ "Driver's cough smash "cause"". The Sun (12660). New South Wales, Australia. 25 August 1950. p. 9 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved 18 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  6. ^ "Says Train Driver Took Smash Blame". Brisbane Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 23 August 1950. p. 13 (LAST RACE). Retrieved 17 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  7. ^ "LOOK-OUT "NOT KEPT"". The Sydney Morning Herald (35,181). New South Wales, Australia. 22 September 1950. p. 4. Retrieved 19 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  8. ^ "12 HURT; 3 TRAINS IN CITY SMASH". Daily Advertiser. New South Wales, Australia. 29 July 1950. p. 1. Retrieved 16 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  9. ^ "Driver's cough smash "cause"". The Sun (12660). New South Wales, Australia. 25 August 1950. p. 9 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved 18 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  10. ^ "Train smash at 40 mph-- says rail officer". The Sun (12659). New South Wales, Australia. 24 August 1950. p. 2 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved 19 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  11. ^ "LOOK-OUT "NOT KEPT"". The Sydney Morning Herald (35,181). New South Wales, Australia. 22 September 1950. p. 4. Retrieved 19 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  12. ^ "Editorial". The Sun (12641). New South Wales, Australia. 3 August 1950. p. 3 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved 17 July 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 

External links[edit]