SM U-29 (Germany)

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SM U 29 leaving harbour 800px.jpg
SM U 29, Commander Otto Weddigen, leaving harbour for the last cruise
History
German Empire
Name: U-29
Ordered: 19 February 1912
Builder: Kaiserliche Werft Danzig
Launched: 11 October 1913
Commissioned: 1 August 1914
Fate: Rammed and sunk by HMS Dreadnought on 18 March 1915
General characteristics [1]
Class and type: German Type U 27 submarine
Displacement:
  • 675 t (664 long tons) surfaced
  • 878 t (864 long tons) submerged
Length: 64.70 m (212 ft 3 in) (o/a)
Beam: 6.32 m (20 ft 9 in)
Draught: 3.48 m (11 ft 5 in)
Speed:
  • 16.7 knots (30.9 km/h; 19.2 mph) surfaced
  • 9.8 knots (18.1 km/h; 11.3 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 8,420 nmi (15,590 km; 9,690 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) surfaced
  • 85 nmi (157 km; 98 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (164 ft)
Complement: 4 officers, 31 enlisted
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
  • Kptlt. Wilhelm Plange
  • 1 August 1914 – 15 February 1915
  • Kptlt. Otto Weddigen
  • 16 February – 18 March 1915
Operations: 1 patrol
Victories:
  • 4 merchant ships sunk (12,934 GRT)
  • 2 ships damaged (4,317 GRT)

SM U-29[Note 1] was a Type U-27 U-boat of the Imperial German Navy. She served during the First World War.

U-29's last commander was Captain Otto Weddigen. U-29 was sunk with all hands on 18 March 1915 in the Pentland Firth after being rammed by HMS Dreadnought.[2] She is the only submarine known to have been sunk by a battleship.

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 2] Fate[3]
11 March 1915 Adenwen  United Kingdom 3,798 Damaged
11 March 1915 Auguste Conseil  France 2,952 Sunk
12 March 1915 Andalusian  United Kingdom 2,349 Sunk
12 March 1915 Headlands  United Kingdom 2,988 Sunk
12 March 1915 Indian City  United Kingdom 4,645 Sunk
14 March 1915 Atalanta  United Kingdom 519 Damaged

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
  2. ^ Tonnages are in gross register tons

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Gröner 1991, pp. 6-7.
  2. ^ History.ney.mil, Dreadnought
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by U 29". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 22 December 2014.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.

Coordinates: 58°20′N 0°57′E / 58.333°N 0.950°E / 58.333; 0.950