Sara DeCosta-Hayes

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Sara DeCosta-Hayes
Born (1977-05-13) May 13, 1977 (age 41)
Warwick, RI, USA
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 140 lb (64 kg; 10 st 0 lb)
Position Goaltender
Caught Left
Hockey East team Providence
National team  United States
Playing career 1995–2002

Sara Ann DeCosta (born May 13, 1977) is an American ice hockey player. She won a gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics, and a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Biography[edit]

She is the daughter of Nancy and Frank DeCosta,[1] she was born in and grew up in Warwick, Rhode Island, and is Jewish.[2][3][4][5] She is an alumna of Toll Gate High School, where she played goalie on the boy’s hockey team.[6] DeCosta is married, and the couple has three children.[7]

She attended Providence College ('00), where she was a hockey goalie, and allowed only 177 goals with 2,324 saves in 85 games,[8] she graduated with a degree in social science, with concentrations in sociology and psychology.[8]

She won a gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics (she had three wins, one a shutout, with a 1.59 goals-against average and a .875 save percentage) and a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics , where she had the best goals-against average and save percentage.[7][8][9]

She won a World Championship silver medal in 2000, had the best GAA (0.50) and the best SVS% (.975) at the 2001 World Championship where she again won a silver medal, and had the best GAA (1.00) and the best SVS% (.948) at the 2002 World Championship where she again won a silver medal.[9]

DeCosta was USA Hockey Women's Player of the Year in 2000;[4] in 2002-03, she was a volunteer coach for the women's hockey team at Providence.[4] She was the goaltending coach for the Harvard Crimson women's ice hockey team in 2008-09.[4][10]

DeCosta was named by Brandeis University, a contemporary Jewish sports heroine.[11][12]

Awards and honors[edit]

  • 2000 and 2002 USA Hockey Women’s Player of the Year Award (also known as the Bob Allen Women's Player of the Year award) [13]
  • 2018 - inducted into the Rhode Island Hockey Hall of Fame.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]