Sargis Pitsak

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First page of the Gospel of Mark in Armenian, by Sargis Pitsak, 14th century.

Sargis Pitsak (Armenian: Սարգիս Պիծակ) was an early 14th-century Armenian artist.[1] Nearly 50 illustrated manuscripts are attributed to him,[2] his father was called Grigor.[3]

Pitsak lived in Cilicia, during a difficult period when epidemics often followed wars,[4] he copied and illustrated manuscripts on the request of King Levon IV,[5] queen Mariun and others.[6]

Pitsak seems to have been familiar with the work of Toros Roslin and he completed the illustration of a famous Gospel (Matenadaran, Cod. 7651), in which some miniatures reflect Roslin's influence.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Adalian, R.P. (2010). Historical Dictionary of Armenia. Historical Dictionaries of Europe. Scarecrow Press. p. 190. ISBN 978-0-8108-7450-3. Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  2. ^ Hovannisian, R.G.; Payaslian, S. (2008). Armenian Cilicia. Armenian Research Center collection. Mazda Publishers. p. 269. ISBN 978-1-56859-154-4. Retrieved 9 October 2018. The importance of Sis was partly because of the fact that it was the main residence of the famous painter Sargis Pitsak, whose works included nearly fifty manuscripts ...
  3. ^ Abgari͡a︡n, G.V. (1962). The Matenadaran. Armenian Research Center collection. Armenian State Pub. House. p. 57. Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  4. ^ Antiquarian Book Monthly (in French). ABMR Publications. 1994. p. 23. Retrieved 9 October 2018. The exhibition includes major works by Cilicia's most brilliant illuminator, Toros Roslin, and his successor, Sargis Pitsak.
  5. ^ Stone, N.; Stone, M.E.; Chester Beatty Library (2007). The Armenians: Art, Culture and Religion. Armenian Research Center collection. Chester Beatty Library. p. 87. ISBN 978-1-904832-37-9. Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  6. ^ Society for Armenian Studies (1995). Journal of the Society for Armenian Studies: JSAS. Society for Armenian Studies. p. 20. Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  7. ^ Akopian, A. (2001). Armenians and the World: Yesterday and Today. Noyan Tapan. p. 130. ISBN 978-99930-51-29-9. Retrieved 9 October 2018. Mentioned in particular should be the miniaturists Toros Roslin and Sarkis Pitsak, who created unsurpassed world scale masterpieces of miniature.

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