Sequential Circuits Studio 440

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Studio 440
440overhead.jpg
Studio 440
ManufacturerSequential Circuits
Dates1987
PriceUS$5,000 (approx.)
Technical specifications
Polyphony8 voices
Timbrality8 parts [1]
Oscillator2
LFO1 (Saw Up, Saw Down, Square, Triangle)
Synthesis typeROMpler Subtractive
FilterAnalog Low Pass non-resonant filter with envelope
AttenuatorAttack-Decay-Sustain-Release
Velocity expressionYes
Storage memory512kb
EffectsNone
Input/output
Keyboard8 pads
External controlMIDI

The Studio 440 was a sampler sequencer and 32 sound drum machine manufactured by Dave Smith's Sequential Circuits (SCI) and released in 1986. The sampler's core is similar to that of the Prophet 2000 and Prophet 2002. There is a 3.5" floppy disk drive to [2]store samples and data.

Like the Prophet 3000, the Studio 440—and many of Sequential's products—lost sales due to the brand loyalty demanded by its competitors, including Akai Professional, Roland Corporation, and Korg.

Sample rate[edit]

The 440 also made it easier to access the full 512kb of memory available, to create 12-bit samples from 12.5 to 33.5 seconds and up to 41.667 kHz.[3]

  • 15.625 kHz rate : 33.5 seconds  —  6 kHz bandwidth [4]
  • 31.250 kHz rate : 16.7 seconds  —  12kHz bandwidth
  • 4l.667 kHz rate : 12.5 seconds  —  18 kHz bandwidth

Sequencer[edit]

  • 8 tracks[5]
  • 40,000 note capacity[6]
  • 999 measures per sequence
  • 99 sequences
  • Two discrete MIDI Outs with up to 32 channels of MIDI

Notable users[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sequential Circuits Studio 440 Drum Machine Sampler". Encyclotronic. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  2. ^ synthhead (2010-02-02). "The Sequential Circuits Studio 440". Synthtopia. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  3. ^ SCI, Pierre G. / Copyrights. "Sequential Curcuits STUDIO-440 introduction". siliciumalpha.chez.com. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  4. ^ SCI, Pierre G. / Copyrights. "Sequential Curcuits STUDIO-440 introduction". siliciumalpha.chez.com. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  5. ^ "Sequential Circuits Studio 440 | Vintage Synth Explorer". www.vintagesynth.com. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  6. ^ "The Shape Of Things To Come (SOS Sep 86)". www.muzines.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  7. ^ "Sequential Circuits Studio 440: Samplers". synth.market. Retrieved 2018-08-16.

Further reading[edit]