Sergio (carbonado)

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Sergio (Portuguese: Carbonado do Sérgio) is the largest carbonado and the largest rough diamond ever found.[1] It weighed 3,167 carats (633.4 g; 20.36 ozt) and was found above ground in Lençóis (State of Bahia, Brazil) in 1895 by Sérgio Borges de Carvalho. Like other carbonados it is believed to be of meteoritic origin.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

Sergio was first sold for $16,000 and later for $25,000 to Joalheria Kahn and Co. and shipped to G. Kahn in Paris, who sold it to I. K. Gulland of London in September 1895 for 6,400. There, it was broken up into small 3–6-carat (0.60–1.20 g; 0.021–0.042 oz) pieces as industrial diamond drills.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ William, Stephen E. (Summer 2017). "Carbonado Diamond: A Review of Properties and Origin". Gemological Institute of America. Retrieved 4 April 2018.
  2. ^ "Carbonado - A possible relic from Uranus or Neptune". meteoritestudies.com. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  3. ^ Rudler, Frederick William (1911). "Carbonado" . In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica. 5 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 307.
  4. ^ Broad, William J. (17 September 1996). "Giant Black Diamonds Of Mysterious Origin May Hail From Space". New York Times. Retrieved 4 April 2018.
  5. ^ "Diamonds in the Sky". www.pbs.org.
  6. ^ Ralf Tappert, Michelle C. Tappert "Diamonds in Nature: A Guide to Rough Diamonds", p. 41
  7. ^ Mark A. Prelas, Galina Popovici, Louis K. Bigelow (eds.) "Handbook of Industrial Diamonds and Diamond Films", p. 484
  8. ^ G.J.H. McCall, "The carbonado diamond conundrum" Archived 2014-02-21 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ R.A. Ketcham, "New textural evidence on the origin of carbonado diamond: An example of 3-D petrography using X-ray computed tomography" Geosphere, GES00908.1, first published on August 14, 2013
  10. ^ Herold, Marc W. (April 2013). "The Black Diamonds of Bahia (Carbonados) and the Building of Euro-America: A Half-century Supply Monopoly (1880s-1930s)" (PDF). University of New Hampshire. p. 12. Retrieved 4 April 2018.