Sidney Hertzberg

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Sidney Hertzberg
Sidney Hertzberg.jpeg
Hertzberg circa 1949
Personal information
Born (1922-07-29)July 29, 1922
Brooklyn, New York
Died July 24, 2005(2005-07-24) (aged 82)
Woodmere, New York
Nationality American
Listed height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Listed weight 175 lb (79 kg)
Career information
High school Tilden (Brooklyn, New York)
College CCNY
Playing career 1946–1951
Position Guard
Number 8, 14, 29, 4
Career history
19461947 New York Knicks
1947–1949 Washington Capitols
19491951 Boston Celtics
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Sidney "Sonny" Hertzberg (July 29, 1922 – July 24, 2005) was an American professional basketball player.

Early life[edit]

Hertzberg was born in Brooklyn, New York, grew up in Crown Heights, and was Jewish.[1][2] Hertzberg played at Samuel J. Tilden High School and City College of New York, where he was a teammate of longtime Knicks coach Red Holzman.[2]

Professional career[edit]

Hertzberg began his professional career in 1946, signing with his home team New York Knicks. He played with the team in the inaugural Basketball Association of America season in 1946–47. He played five games with the team in the 1947–48 before being released. Hertzberg signed with the Washington Capitols, and played for two seasons with the team under future Hall of Fame coach Red Auerbach. On September 28, 1949, Hertzberg was traded to the Boston Celtics for Chick Halbert.[3] Hertzberg was reunited with former Washington coach Auerbach in his second season with Boston in 1950–51. Auerbach and rookie point guard Bob Cousy referred to Hertzberg as "the second coach on the floor", and he was respected for his playmaking and court savviness.[4]

After playing five seasons of professional basketball, Hertzberg served as a scout and broadcasting commentator for the Knicks.[4]

He is a member of the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame, the Old-Timers Basketball Hall of Fame, the City College Hall of Fame, and the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.[2]

Later life and death[edit]

Hertzberg went on to become a managing director of Bear Stearns, an investment banking and brokerage firm.[4]

Hertzberg died of heart failure on July 24, 2005 at his home in Woodmere, New York.[4]

BAA/NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played  FG%  Field-goal percentage
 FT%  Free-throw percentage  RPG  Rebounds per game
 APG  Assists per game  PPG  Points per game
 Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP FG% FT% RPG APG PPG
1946–47 New York 59 .289 .758 .6 8.7
1947–48 New York 4 .071 .750 .3 1.3
1947–48 Washington 37 .273 .797 .6 7.4
1948–49 Washington 60 .285 .817 1.9 7.4
1949–50 Boston 68 .318 .749 2.9 10.2
1950–51 Boston 65 .316 .826 4.0 3.8 9.8
Career 293 .299 .792 4.0 2.1 8.7

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP FG% FT% RPG APG PPG
1947 New York 5 .217 .750 1.0 7.2
1949 Washington 11 .348 .851 2.5 10.7
1951 Boston 2 .231 .800 1.0 1.5 5.0
Career 18 .294 .833 1.0 1.9 9.1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]