Silesian Stadium

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Silesian Stadium
Slaski Stadium under construction, Chorzow, Poland (28028862984).jpg
Full name Silesian Stadium
Stadion Śląski
Location ul. Katowicka 10, 41-500 Chorzów, Silesia, Poland
Capacity 55,211
Record attendance 130 000 (1973 Speedway World Championship, 2 September 1973)
Field size 105 x 68 m
Surface Grass
Construction
Built 1951–1956
Opened 22 July 1956
1 October 2017
Expanded 2009–2017
Construction cost c. 650 million PLN
c. 155 million
Architect GMP Architekten
Tenants
Poland national football team (2018 – )
Website
Official Website

Silesian Stadium (Polish: Stadion Śląski) is a sport stadium located on the premises of Silesian Park in Chorzów, Poland. The stadium has a fully covered capacity of 55,211[1], after a recent refurbishment completed in October 2017. The stadium hosted many Polish national football team matches and for many decades was Poland's national stadium, after the National Stadium in Warsaw had been completed, the Silesian Stadium lost that role. The stadium was not in operation between 2009 and 2017 due to its ongoing reconstruction.

Silesian Stadium is a UEFA Category 4 stadium.[2]

History[edit]

Old stadium entrance

In 1950, as a part of an ambitious project to build Silesian Park, plans for Silesian Stadium were drawn up by Julian Brzuchowski.[3]. Construction began in 1951, and the stadium opened in 1956, the stadium was inaugurated on 22 July 1956 with a match against East Germany.

In 1993, the stadium officially was branded as Polish national stadium, due to the state of the venue in Warsaw, the stadium regularly hosted football matches, as well as concerts and other events.

Modernization[edit]

Silesian Stadium was one of the venues shortlisted for UEFA Euro 2012 tournament, but it did not make the final list, the venue was also shortlisted as the Polish candidate for UEFA Euro 2020[4].

From 2009, the stadium underwent modernization which included the construction of a 43,000 square metre roof, new stands, lighting, video screens and an improved sound system, the speedway track has been replaced with a traditional track that will allow Chorzów to host international athletics events. The new roof collapsed in 2011[5] putting project on hold. Though originally planned to be completed by autumn 2011 for 415 million złoty, the finishing touches were only completed in 2017 costing around 650 million złoty.

Events[edit]

Football[edit]

Poland national football team[edit]

[citation needed]

No. Date Match Result Turnout
1 22 July 1956 PolandGDR 0–2 90 000
2 20 October 1957 Poland – USSR 2–1 100 000
3 11 May 1958 Poland – Ireland 2–2 80 000
4 14 September 1958 Poland – Hungary 1–3 90 000
5 28 June 1959 Poland – Spain 2–4 100 000
6 8 November 1959 Poland – Finland 6–2 22 000
7 26 June 1960 Poland – Bulgaria 4–0 25 000
8 25 June 1961 Poland – Yugoslavia 1–1 100 000
9 5 November 1961 Poland – Denmark 5–0 10 000
10 10 October 1962 Poland – Northern Ireland 0–2 50 000
11 2 June 1963 Poland – Romania 1–1 40 000
12 23 May 1965 Poland – Scotland 1–1 80 000
13 3 May 1966 Poland – Hungary 1–1 95 000
14 5 July 1966 Poland – England 0–1 70 000
15 21 May 1967 Poland – Belgium 3–1 65 000
16 24 April 1968 Poland – Turkey 8–0 35 000
17 30 October 1968 Poland – Ireland 1–0 18 000
18 7 September 1969 Poland – Netherlands 2–1 85 000
19 14 October 1970 Poland – Albania 3–0 10 000
20 6 June 1973 Poland – England 2–0 90 000
21 26 September 1973 Poland – Wales 3–0 90 000
22 10 September 1975 Poland – Netherlands 4–1 85 000
23 24 March 1976 Poland – Argentina 1–2 60 000
24 21 September 1977 Poland – Denmark 4–1 80 000
25 29 September 1977 Poland – Portugal 1–1 80 000
26 4 April 1979 Poland – Hungary 1–1 60 000
27 2 May 1979 Poland – Netherlands 2–0 85 000
28 26 September 1979 Poland – GDR 1–1 70 000
29 6 June 1980 Poland – Czechoslovakia 1–1 45 000
30 2 May 1981 Poland – GDR 1–0 80 000
31 2 September 1981 Poland – Germany 0–2 70 000
32 22 May 1983 Poland – USSR 1–1 75 000
33 11 September 1985 Poland – Belgium 0–0 75 000
34 16 November 1985 Poland – Italy 1–0 20 000
35 19 October 1988 Poland – Albania 1–0 35 000
36 11 October 1989 Poland – England 0–0 35 000
37 25 October 1989 Poland – Sweden 0–2 15 000
38 29 May 1993 Poland – England 1–1 65 000
39 2 April 1997 Poland – Italy 0–0 32 000
40 31 May 1997 Poland – England 0–2 30 000
41 27 May 1998 Poland – Russia 3–1 8 000
42 31 March 1999 Poland – Sweden 0–1 28 000
43 1 September 2001 Poland – Norway 3–0 43 000
44 6 October 2001 Poland – Ukraine 1–1 25 000
45 29 March 2003 Poland – Hungary 0–0 47 000
46 10 September 2003 Poland – Sweden 0–2 20 000
47 8 September 2004 Poland – England 1–2 45 000
48 3 September 2005 Poland – Austria 3–2 45 000
49 31 May 2006 Poland – Colombia 1–2 40 000
50 11 October 2006 Poland – Portugal 2–1 45 000
51 17 November 2007 Poland – Belgium 2–0 47 000
52 1 June 2008 Poland – Denmark 1–1 35 000
53 11 October 2008 Poland – Czech Republic 2–1 47 000
54 5 September 2009 Poland – Northern Ireland 1–1 45 000
55 14 October 2009 Poland – Slovakia 0–1 4 000
56 27 March 2018 Poland – South Korea 3–2 53 129

Club football[edit]

Numerous Ekstraklasa matches have been played - mostly by the local team Ruch Chorzów, especially for the Great Silesian Derby matches against neighbours Górnik Zabrze due to extra interest from the fans.[6] As it used to be the only national stadium with such a large capacity in the country for numerous years, Polish Cup matches have been frequently hosted there too,[7] especially the final matches.[8]

Speedway[edit]

The football pitch at the Silesia Stadium used to be surrounded by a 384 metres (420 yards) long Motorcycle speedway track, the first World Final held at the stadium in 1973, was run in front of the largest crowd in world speedway history.[9] English speedway 'golden boy' Peter Collins won the 1976 World Final at Silesian.[10]

Ivan Mauger won the 1979 World Final at the stadium. [11] Silesian also hosted the Final of the 1974 Speedway World Team Cup, won by England, as well as the Final of both the 1978 and 1981 World Pairs Championships.[12]

Other[edit]

In 2009, it was the venue of performances by Monster Jam.[13][14]

Photo gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Stadiums in Poland". World Stadiums. Retrieved 13 December 2017. 
  2. ^ "Stadion Śląski w najwyższej kategorii według UEFA! Co to znaczy?". Dziennik Zachodni. Retrieved 14 March 2018. 
  3. ^ "Silesian Stadium: Back in Business!". InYourPocket. Retrieved 14 March 2018. 
  4. ^ "Silesian Stadium picked as Euro 2020 candidate". Radio Poland. Retrieved 14 March 2018. 
  5. ^ "Poland: Śląski slowly rising to glory (?) again". Stadiumdb.com. Retrieved 14 March 2018. 
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-06-17. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-17. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-17. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-17. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-17. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-17. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-17. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-10-17. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-15. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  • Gazeta Wyborcza
    • "Pół wieku Stadionu Śląskiego" Część 1, 26 czerwca 2006, page: 1, 2, 3, 4
    • "Pół wieku Stadionu Śląskiego" Część 3, 10 lipca 2006, page: 1, 2, 3, 4
    • "Pół wieku Stadionu Śląskiego" Część 4, 17 lipca 2006, page: 1, 2, 3, 4

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 50°17′17.53″N 18°58′22.65″E / 50.2882028°N 18.9729583°E / 50.2882028; 18.9729583