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Skiing in Victoria, Australia

Skiing in Victoria, Australia takes place in the Australian Alps located in the State of Victoria during the southern hemisphere winter. Victoria is the State with the greatest number of ski resorts in Australia; the highest peak in Victoria is Mount Bogong at 1986m. The first ski tow was constructed near Mount Buffalo in 1938. Victoria has a number of well developed ski resorts including Mount Hotham, Falls Creek and Mount Buller. Cross country skiing is popular in such national parks as Mount Buffalo National Park and Alpine National Park. A hospice was built at Mount Saint Bernard around 1863 along a track developed to link the Victorian gold fields. Snowshoes were developed locally to assist winter travellers and a larger hospice built around 1884. Recreational and practical skiing was being practised in the area by the 1880s and 90s with skis made from local timbers, making use of single steering poles; the first winter traverse of the Victorian Alps was made via the Hospice and Mount Hotham.

The Hospice operated as a recreational ski location into the 1930s, but was destroyed by bushfire in 1939. Skiing began at Mount Buffalo in the 1890s and the Mount Buffalo Chalet in Victoria was constructed in 1910. Australia's first ski tow was constructed near Mount Buffalo in 1938. Buffalo's first ski lodge was built at Dingo Dell in 1954. A bushfire in 2006 forced the temporary closure of the resort and negotiations are continuing over a new lease on the property. A stone cottage was built at Mount Hotham in 1925 to cater for a growing interest in sport of skiing and a Club was built in 1944 with the first ski tow installed in 1951. A ski hut was erected at Mount Baw Baw, just 120 km East of Melbourne, in 1945 and a ski rope tow added in 1955; the first ski lift went into service at Mount Buller in 1949, in the same year rope tow was installed at Falls Creek. In 1957, Australia's first chairlift was installed at Falls Creek, the area is today the largest ski resort in Victoria; the Mount Buller Interschools Event claims to be the largest interdisciplinary snow-sports event on earth.

In 2008 it attracted 3500 participants. Snow play is available at Mount Donna Buang. Dedicated Cross Country ski resorts are located at Lake Mountain, Mount Stirling and Mount St Gwinear in Victoria and popular areas for back country skiing and ski touring in the Alpine National Park, Yarra Ranges National Park and the Baw Baw National Park include: Mount Bogong, Mount Feathertop, Bogong High Plains, Mount Howitt, Mount Reynard and Snowy Plains; the Kangaroo Hoppet is a leg of the Worldloppet cross-country race series, conducted on the last Saturday of August each year, hosted by Falls Creek in Victoria. The showpiece 42-kilometre race attracts thousands of competitors; the Australian High Country is populated by unique flora and fauna including wombats, wallabies and the Snow Gum. The Alpine regions are subject to environmental protection, which has limited the scope of commercial development of skiiable terrain, however Australia has extensive cross country skiing terrain. Mount Hotham Dinner Plain Falls Creek Mount Buller Mount Baw Baw Alpine Resort Lake Mountain Mount St Gwinear Mount Stirling Mount Buffalo Mount Donna Buang Mount Torbreck Popular areas for back country skiing and ski touring in the Alpine National Park, Mount Buffalo National Park, Yarra Ranges National Park and the Baw Baw National Park include: Mount Bogong Bogong High Plains Mount Feathertop Mount Buffalo Mount Stirling Mount Howitt Mount Reynard Snowy Plains National Alpine Museum of Australia List of ski areas and resorts in Australia Skiing in Australia Skiing in New South Wales List of ski areas and resorts in Australia Winter sport in Australia Information on all ski lifts to have operated in Victoria in the Australian Ski Lift Directory The Australian Alpine Club

2004 World Darts Trophy

The 2004 Bavaria World Darts Trophy was the third edition of the World Darts Trophy, a professional darts tournament held at the De Vechtsebanen in Utrecht, the Netherlands, run by the British Darts Organisation and the World Darts Federation. The 2003 winner, Raymond van Barneveld retained the trophy beating Martin Adams in the final of the men's event, 6–4 in sets. Andy Fordham; the BDO World Champion, was absent from the field this year in the men's event. In the women's event, the 2003 winner and the BDO World Champion, Trina Gulliver lost at the quarter-final stage to Anastasia Dobromyslova. Dobromyslova was beaten by Francis Hoenselaar, last year's finalist, 3–1 in sets in the final. Men Raymond van Barneveld Mervyn King Tony West Ted Hankey Tony David Gary Anderson Tony O'Shea Darryl Fitton

Talarn

Talarn is a municipality in the comarca of the Pallars Jussà in Catalonia, Spain. It is situated in the centre of the Tremp basin, on the Noguera Pallaresa river below the Sant Antoni reservoir, it is of a training school of the Spanish army. The town is served by the C-147 road between La Pobla de Segur. Talarn was originated on a hill around the former castle, it was an important fortified place and the chief town of the area of Pallars in 1453. The arms show a wall, the enclosure around the town, the royal arms of Catalonia-Aragon, alluding to the royal jurisdiction; these arms were granted on July 25, 1991. Panareda Clopés, Josep Maria. Guia de Catalunya, Barcelona: Caixa de Catalunya. ISBN 84-87135-01-3. ISBN 84-87135-02-1. Official website Government data pages

Northwest Airlines Flight 4422

On March 12, 1948, Northwest Airlines Flight 4422 crashed into Mount Sanford, with a crew of six and 24 passengers. The flight was a C-54 charter flying back to the United States from Shanghai; the aircraft refueled at Anchorage and took off at 8:12 P. M. to continue on to New York City. Instead of following the published airway, which detoured around Mount Sanford, the aircraft flew a direct line, crashing into the mountain. After the initial impact the wreckage slid down for about 3000 feet before coming to rest. There were no survivors; the passengers were American merchant mariners, crew members of the tanker SS Sunset, being ferried back home. Many witnesses in the nearby town of Gulkana saw the crash, the wreckage was located from the air, but it was inaccessible at the time. Snowstorms buried it in a mountain glacier, it was lost for over 50 years. Over the years, various individuals, lured by rumors of a secret gold cargo shipment from China, searched the mountain and came home empty-handed.

Northwest pilot Marc Millican and Delta pilot Kevin McGregor had been searching the mountain together and on their own since 1995. In 1997 Millican and McGregor located a few pieces of wreckage but were unable to confirm it was from Northwest 4422. Only in 1999, after obtaining permission from the National Park Service and victims' relatives, were they able to remove wreckage confirming it was from Flight 4422. No secret treasure was found. At the time of the crash it was determined the pilots were 23 miles off course and may not have seen the mountain at night. An NTSB investigation in 1999 shows the propellers were spinning at high velocity when they struck the mountain, which supports this theory. In addition to wreckage discovered in 1999, a mummified left hand and arm was found in the Alaska glacier. After nearly a decade, identifiable fingerprints were recovered from the remains by Edward Robinson; the remains were positively identified by Michael Grimm on September 6, 2007 using fingerprints, making this the world's oldest known identification of post-mortem remains using fingerprint identification.

The limb was from Francis Joseph Van Zandt, a 36-year-old merchant marine from Roanoke, one of the passengers on Flight 4422. Subsequently, using DNA from a descendant of Van Zandt, Dr. Odile Loreille, an expert in DNA analysis, was able to identify the remains using mitochondrial and Y-DNA identification. Only the remains of Francis Joseph Van Zandt were recovered or identified; the bodies of the remaining 29 individuals still await possible recovery. In 2013, Kevin A. McGregor published Flight Of Gold, a non-fiction account of the events of Flight 4422, the multiple previous efforts to locate and explore the crash site, McGregor and Millican's search for the crash site and its rumored valuable cargo. 1947 BSAA Avro Lancastrian Star Dust accident – Airliner that crashed onto a mountain glacier in 1947 and remained undiscovered until 1998

Lytchett Minster and Upton

Lytchett Minster and Upton is a civil parish in the English county of Dorset. The parish comprises the village of Lytchett Minster and the nearby built up area of Upton, contiguous with the urban area of Poole; the parish has an area of 14.35 square kilometres. At the time of the 2001 census, it had a population of 7,573 living in 3,227 dwellings; the parish forms part of the Purbeck local government district of the county of Dorset. It is within the Mid Dorset and North Poole constituency of the House of Commons and the South West England constituency of the European Parliament. Census data for Lytchett Minster and Upton parish

Amy Woods Brinkley

Amy Woods Brinkley was the Global Risk Executive of Bank of America from 2001 until, at the age of 53 in June 2009, she and CEO Ken Lewis "agreed she would retire," according to a New York Times report, after a surge in credit losses led to a government bailout and orders by regulators to raise $33.9 billion of capital. Brinkley was awarded the top position on US Banker magazine's 2005 list of "Most Powerful Women in Banking," and was number 23 on Fortune's "50 Most Powerful Women in Business" in 2006 and 2007 and 22nd in 2008, when she was reported to be "a possible candidate to succeed... Ken Lewis." In all, Brinkley was named to the Fortune list nine consecutive years. In addition, she was cited by The Wall Street Journal and Forbes as one of the leading women in business; as head of the Bank's risk department, Brinkley was tasked with protecting the Bank from all kinds of risk, ranging from human resources-related factors to interest rate fluctuations and credit risk. According to the Times, "she was at Mr. Lewis’s side as the bank expanded its credit card and home equity lending, businesses that are causing charge-offs for the bank."

Her most recent assignment was as "the point person between the bank and the regulators during the stress tests." As to compensation, "Ms. Brinkley received no bonus last year, but she took home at least $37.2 million during her tenure as Bank of America’s risk chief from 2001 to 2007, according to an analysis by Equilar, a compensation research firm. She is entitled to pension benefits worth more than $12 million, millions more in deferred pay and accumulated stock; the figures are based on the 2008 proxy statement, the last time data was publicly available."Brinkley joined the Bank of America organization in 1978, as a Commercial Credit Department management trainee for NCNB. From 1993-2001, she served first as the company's Marketing executive and as president of its Consumer Products division. Brinkley graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, she serves on the Bank of America Charitable Foundation Board of Directors. She serves as a trustee for both the Princeton Theological Seminary and Carolinas HealthCare System.

She is a member of the governing board of the Carolina Thread Trail. She served on the Institute of International Finance Board of Directors and the President's Commission on White House Fellowships, participated in the annual World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, she lives in Charlotte, North Carolina, where she is an active voice for the community's health and human services needs, in particular those of families and children. She has worked with the Critical Needs Task Force, the Crossroads Charlotte Initiative and the Council for Children's Rights. Brinkley is married with children, in recent years her husband, a lawyer, has stayed at home with the children. Official biography from bankofamerica.com. Page blank a/o 6/5/09. "Greg Curl Named Chief Risk Officer at Bank of America" Company press release on retirement. June 4, 2009. Retrieved 6/5/09. "Confident Humility and the Start of the 21st Century" - Remarks to the Global Association of Risk Professionals, 24 February 2004. Profile from Forbes.com