Slenthem

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Slenthem / Gender panembung
(Collection of Tropenmuseum)

The slenthem (also slentem or gender panembung) is a Javanese metallophone which makes up part of a gamelan orchestra.

The slenthem is part of the gendér family,[1] it consists of a set of bronze keys comprising a single octave: there are six keys when playing the slendro scale and seven when playing the pelog. These keys are suspended by leather cords over individual bamboo tube resonators in a wooden frame, which are cut so that the placement of the bamboo's node causes the functional length of the resonator to be shorter for higher notes; the instrument is played by striking the keys with a mallet, called a tabuh, which has a short handle and a thin wooden disk edged in cloth or rubber. One hand is left free to dampen notes,[2] it is a low-pitched instrument[3] with a softer sound than the saron demung.[4]

Like the saron barung and demung, it generally plays the most basic form of the melody (balungan) in a composition;[5] however it also sometimes uses techniques similar to the saron to elaborate. It is especially favored in quieter gamelan ensembles (such as Gamelan Gadhon); but it is a part of standard Gamelan Gedhé as the only soft-style instrument also played in loud-style pieces.

It is typically placed among the instruments at the front of the performing area.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hood, Mantle; Maceda, José (1972), Music, Brill Archive, ISBN 978-90-04-03402-0
  2. ^ Gaetano Jr., Mario A. (Spring–Summer 1978), "Definite pitched idiophones of the Javanese gamelan" (PDF), Percussionist, 15 (3): 121–143
  3. ^ Benamou, Marc; Supanggah, Rahayu (2006), Indonesia, Central Java: Solonese Gamelan: A Garland of Moods (PDF), Maison des Cultures du Monde
  4. ^ Dean, Deirdre (July 1996), "The classroom gamelan" (PDF), Counterpoint: 31–37, archived from the original (PDF) on June 15, 2005
  5. ^ Kartomi, Margaret J. (1990), On Concepts and Classifications of Musical Instruments, University of Chicago Press, pp. 101, 104, ISBN 978-0-226-42549-8
  6. ^ Kartomi, Margaret J. (1990), On Concepts and Classifications of Musical Instruments, University of Chicago Press, p. 89, ISBN 978-0-226-42549-8

External links[edit]