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Song Zheyuan

Sòng Zhéyuán was a Chinese general during the Chinese Civil War and Second Sino-Japanese War. Born in the village of Zhaohong, northwest of the seat of Laoling County, Shandong, he was educated under his uncle from his mother's side, a teacher of a traditional Confucian private school in Yanshan County. At the age of 20 he began studying in the military institute founded by Lu Jianzhang at Beijing and had since become Lu's favorite. In 1912 the troops of Lu and Feng Yuxiang, now subordinates of Yuan Shikai, were regrouped and Feng had been Song's superior. In 1917, a year after being appointed the head of 1st battalion of Feng's 2nd regiment, his battalion spearheaded the removal of Zhang Xun from his imperial restoration in 1917; as part of the Guominjun he became Governor of Jehol Province in 1926. Following the defeat of the Guominjun in the Anti–Fengtian War Feng Yuxiang participated in the Northern Expedition, Sòng assumed the Chairmanship of Shaanxi province in November 1927 and in April of the same year the head of 4th division under the II Corps of the National Revolutionary Army.

Switching sides to the Kuomintang after the abortive coup d'état in 1930 of Feng against Chiang Kai-shek, his troops were designated as the 29th Army and garrisoned in southern Shanxi province where he was responsible for the frontiers of the Rehe and Chahar provinces against the Japanese in Manchukuo. Song was the chairman of Chahar province when Japan invaded the provinces in the end of year 1932. Though poorly equipped compared to the better armed Japanese, Song led the 29th army to resist the aggression in a war known as the Defense of the Great Wall. Japanese troops entered the suburbs of Beijing and Tianjin after the predictable victory. Song was reinstalled as commander after the Ho-Umezu agreement. In the Battle of Lugou Bridge, his 29th Army bore the brunt of the Japanese Guandong Army, his troops were halved after the defeat and chased by the Japanese along the Jinpu Railway into Shandong Province during the Beiping–Hankou Railway Operation. However Han Fuqu, chairman of the province and suspected for his clandestine Japanese liaison, forbade Song to retreat across the Yellow River, resulting in the 29th Army being shattered at Shijiazhuang in December 1937 and January 1938.

Remaining forces suffered various losses against the Imperial Japanese Army and were delegated to guerrilla combat after retreating into the mountainous regions at the borders of Henan and Shanxi province in February 1938. He soon suffered various illnesses and died at the age of 54 in Mianyang County, Sichuan province after several unsuccessful medical treatments in Guilin and Chengdu. History of the Republic of China 张学良将军赠给宋哲元的抗日指挥刀 宋哲元与抗日雄狮二十九军

Andy Lambert

Andy Lambert is an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Trinity International University in Deerfield, Illinois from 1997 to 2003 and at Sterling College in Sterling, Kansas from 2004 to 2015 and at Southern Nazarene University in Bethany, Oklahoma from 2016 to 2019. Lambert was the head coach at Trinity International University in Deerfield, Illinois from 1997 through 2003, his record at Trinity was 11 losses. In 2003 he was named "Coach of the Year" by the Mideast League in the Mid-States Football Association. Lambert was the head football coach at Sterling College in Sterling, Kansas from 2004 to 2015. Sterling won the program's first Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference championship in 2013. After the 2015 season, Lambert accepted the position as the head coach at Southern Nazarene University starting with the 2016 season. Southern Nazarene profile

Acylphosphatase

In enzymology, an acylphosphatase is an enzyme that catalyzes the following chemical reaction: Thus, the two substrates of this enzyme are acylphosphate and H2O, whereas its two products are carboxylate and phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the family of hydrolases those acting on acid anhydrides in phosphorus-containing anhydrides; the systematic name of this enzyme class is acylphosphate phosphohydrolase. Other names in common use include acetylphosphatase, 1,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase, acetic phosphatase, Ho 1-3, GP 1-3; this enzyme participates in 3 metabolic pathways: glycolysis / gluconeogenesis pyruvate metabolism, benzoate degradation via coa ligation. Structures of this enzyme have been solved by both X-ray crystallography. See the links to PDB structures in the info boxes on the right for a current list of structures available in the PDB; the protein contains a beta sheet stacked on two alpha helices described by CATH as an Alpha-Beta Plait fold. The active site contains an arginine and an asparagine.

Most structures are monomeric Humans express the following two acylphosphatase isozymes

4th California Infantry Regiment

The 4th California Infantry was a volunteer infantry regiment recruited from northern California during the American Civil War. It was organized at Sacramento and Auburn in September and October 1861. Colonel Henry M. Judah, September 1861 - November, 1861. Colonel Ferris Forman, November, 1861 - August 20, 1863. Colonel James F. Curtis, August 20, 1863 - until it was disbanded by consolidation, November 30, 1865Most of the recruits, caught up in war fever, expected to be sent to the eastern battlefields, they were disappointed to be instead ordered to garrison duty and related tasks on the West Coast, where they spent the remainder of their enlistments. The regiment served principally in the District of Oregon, in the District of Southern California. None of these duties required regimental strength, so the companies of the regiment were detached and scattered; the regiment was mustered out on April 18, 1866. Regimental headquarters - First located at Auburn, Placer County. While stationed there five companies were sent to the District of Oregon to relieve the regulars stationed there.

From February to May, 1862, headquarters and five companies were near Sacramento. During the month of May headquarters was moved to Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, where it remained until September, 1862, when it was transferred to Drum Barracks, where it remained during the rest of the time the regiment was in the service. Company "A" - This company was organized at Placerville, September 21, 1861. Moved from San Francisco to Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory, October 29-November 4, 1861. At Fort Walla Walla, Washington Territory, until August, 1862. Ordered to San Francisco August 15 and duty at Benicia Barracks until March, 1863. Ordered to Camp Drum March 1, duty there until January, 1864. At Santa Barbara until to the terms of service of most of the members expired, they were discharged at Drum Barracks, October 13, 1864. New Company "A" - The few whose terms had not expired, with recruits were organized into a new company. At Santa Barbara until to November, 1864. At Cahuenga Pass, November 30, 1864.

Sent during the month of April 1865 to Fort Humboldt. At Camp Iaqua May 1, 1865, until it was ordered to the Presidio of San Francisco, for final muster out on November 30, 1865. Company "B" - Captain Fitch and Lieutenant Copely of the Mountain Volunteers joined this company, organized at Placerville, September 25, 1861. Moved from San Francisco to Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory, October 29-November 4, 1861. At Fort Vancouver until March, 1862. At Fort Dalles to October, 1862. Ordered to San Francisco October 3, duty at Benicia Barracks until March, 1863. Ordered to Camp Drum March 1, 1863, thence to Fort Mojave April 29, duty there until June, 1864. Ordered to Drum Barracks, duty there until mustered out. New Company "B" - Ordered to Fort Humboldt April 5, 1865, thence to Fort Gaston, duty there until muster out. Company "C" - This company was recruited in Shasta County during the month of September, 1861, it was marched to Auburn, Placer County, where it was mustered into the United States service October 5, 1861.

Moved from San Francisco to Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory, October 29-November 4, 1861. At Fort Walla Walla, Washington Territory, until August, 1862. Ordered to San Francisco August 14, duty at Benicia Barracks until March, 1863. At San Francisco until May. Ordered to Camp Drum May 28, 1863, duty there until January, 1864. Occupation of Santa Catalina Island January 2, duty at Camp Santa Catalina Island until December, 1864. At Drum Barracks until March, 1865, at Fort Mojave until muster out. Company "D" - This company was organized at Auburn, Placer County, mustered into the United States service October 15, 1861. Moved from San Francisco to Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory, October 29-November 4, 1861. At Fort Yamhill, until March, 1863. Ordered to Fort Hoskins March 25, duty there until December, 1864. Expedition from Siletz Block House to Coos Bay April 21-May 12, 1864. At Fort Yamhill until muster out. New Company D - The original company D was mustered out at Fort Vancouver, October 15, 1864.

It was reorganized by re-enlistments and recruiting, was stationed at Fort Yamhill during nearly all the balance of its term of service. It was mustered out at the Presidio, S. F. December 19, 1865. Company "E" - This company was organized at Auburn, Placer County, mustered into the United States service October 10, 1861. Moved from San Francisco to Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory, October 29-November 4, 1861. At Fort Steilacoom until October 3, 1862. Ordered to San Francisco, duty at Benicia Barracks until May, 1863. Ordered to Drum Barracks May 28, duty there until January, 1864. At Fort Yuma until June, 1865. At Drum Barracks until muster out. Company "F" - This company was raised in Coloma, El Dorado County, in September, was mustered into the United States service at Auburn, Placer County, October 16, 1861. At Camp Sigel, near Auburn, until January, 1862. Moved to Camp Union, thence to San Francisco April 28, to Camp Latham, Southern California. At Camp Drum until March, 1863. Moved to Fort Yuma March 1, 1863.

New Company "F" - To Fort Humboldt May 1, 1865. Duty in Humboldt Military District until muster out. Company "G" - This company was organized at Camp Sigel, near Auburn, October 26, 1861. At Camp Sigel, until January, 1862. Moved to Camp Union, thence to San Francisco April 28, 1862, to Camp Latham, District of Southern California. Ordered to San Diego and duty there until muste

Ignatius Behnam II Benni

Mar Ignatius Behnam II Benni was Patriarch of the Syriac Catholic Church from 1893 to 1897. Behnam Benni was born on 14 August 1831 near Mosul. In 1847 he was admitted in the College of the Propaganda in Rome where he remained till 1856 when he received the Doctorate in Theology, he was ordained deacon on 8 March 1856 and priest on 16 March 1856. Behnam Benni served as priest for some years until his appointment as bishop of Mosul by Patriarch Ignatius Antony I Samheri who consecrated him bishop on 9 March 1862, his first years at Mosul were saddened by the fight with Syriac Orthodox for the ownership of the churches in the town. In 1870 Benni was in Rome to participate to the First Vatican Council where he, in opposition to the Melkite patriarch Gregory II Youssef, spoke to make uniform the ecclesiastical discipline in the East and in the West and in favor of the papal infallibility, he was one of the main redactors of the text approved by the synod of Charfet in 1888 that made mandatory the clergy's celibacy in the Syriac Catholic Church.

After the death of patriarch Ignatius George V Shelhot on 8 December 1891, Behnam Benni, the older prelate by consecration, was appointed Locum tenens of the Patriarchate. On 12 October 1893 he was unanimously elected Patriarch, confirmed the same day by Pope Leo XIII by means of a telegraph message and enthroned Sunday 15 October 1893, he was formally confirmed by the pope in the consistory of 18 May 1894. In 1894 Behnam Benni and the Mekite Patriarch Gregory Youssef went to Rome on invitation of Pope Leo XIII for a conference on the Eastern Catholic Churches that led to the approbation of the papal encyclical Orientalium dignitas on 30 November 1894, thus confirming the role and autonomy of the Eastern Catholic Churches. Behnam Benni died in Mosul on 13 September 1897. Behnam Benni, with Joseph David, was the author of the book The Tradition of the Syriac Church of Antioch: Concerning the Primacy and the Prerogatives of St. Peter and of His Successors the Roman Pontiffs translated in English by Joseph Gagliardi and published in London in 1871

UCI Track Cycling World Championships – Women's team sprint

Women's team sprint is a track cycling event contested by teams of two women cyclists. It was introduced as an annual world championship event in 2007, it is to be added to the Olympic programme in 2012. The format consists of two rounds: in the first round, teams compete against the clock to set a qualifying time; the top four teams go through to the final round, where the first and second placed teams compete against each other in the gold medal race-off and the third and fourth teams compete against each other in the bronze medal race-off. As of 2020, Germany have been the most successful team, having won the event five times, placed third four times. Kaarle McCulloch, having featured in all the medalling Australian teams from 2009 up to 2020 is the most successful cyclist in the event's history, with four gold medals – along with the German pair of Kristina Vogel and Miriam Welte. McCulloch’s 8 medals make her the most decorated cyclist in the event, an honour shared with German cyclist Miriam Welte Medalists from UCI.ch archives