South Lancashire (UK Parliament constituency)

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South Lancashire
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
CountyLancashire
18321868
Number of membersTwo until 1861, then three
Replaced bySouth East Lancashire
South West Lancashire
Stalybridge
Created fromLancashire

South Lancashire, formally called the Southern Division of Lancashire or Lancashire Southern, is a former county constituency of the South Lancashire area in England. It returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the British House of Commons from 1832 to 1861, and then three until the constituency was divided in 1868.

The constituency was created by the Great Reform Act of 1832 by the splitting of Lancashire constituency into Northern and Southern divisions, it was abolished by the Second Reform Act of 1867.

Boundaries[edit]

This constituency comprised the hundreds of Salford and West Derby in the southern part of Lancashire.

Salford went to form the new South East Lancashire constituency, and West Derby the new South West Lancashire constituency.

Members of Parliament[edit]

MPs 1832–1861[edit]

  • Constituency created (1832)
Election 1st Member 1st Party 2nd Member 2nd Party
1832 George William Wood Whig[1][2] Viscount Molyneux Whig[1][2]
1835 Lord Francis Egerton Conservative[1] Richard Bootle Wilbraham Conservative[1]
1837
1841
1844 by-election William Entwisle Conservative
1846 by-election William Brown Radical[3][4][5]
1847 Hon. Charles Pelham Villiers Radical[6][7][8]
1847 by-election Alexander Henry Radical[9][10]
1852 John Cheetham Radical[11][12]
1859 Hon. Algernon Egerton Conservative William Legh Conservative
1861 by-election representation increased to three members

MPs 1861–1868[edit]

Election 1st Member 1st Party 2nd Member 2nd Party 3rd Member 3rd Party
1861 by-election Hon. Algernon Egerton Conservative William Legh Conservative Charles Turner Conservative
1865 William Ewart Gladstone Liberal
1868 Reform Act 1867: constituency abolished

Elections[edit]

General election 1832: South Lancashire (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal George Wood 5,694
Liberal Charles Molyneux 5,575
Conservative T Hesketh 3,082
Majority 2,493
Majority 1,757
Registered electors 10,039
General election 1835: South Lancashire (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Francis Egerton 5,620
Conservative Richard Bootle-Wilbraham 4,729
Liberal Charles Molyneux 4,629
Liberal George Wood 4,394
Majority 991
Majority 100
Registered electors 11,519
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
General election 1837: South Lancashire (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Francis Egerton 7,822
Conservative Richard Bootle-Wilbraham 7,645
Liberal E Stanley 6,576
Liberal C Towneley 6,047
Majority 1,246
Majority 1,069
Registered electors 17,754
Conservative hold Swing
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1841: South Lancashire (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Francis Egerton Unopposed
Conservative Richard Bootle-Wilbraham Unopposed
Registered electors 18,178
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Wilbraham's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 24 May 1844: South Lancashire[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Entwisle 7,571 52.1 N/A
Radical William Brown 6,973 47.9 N/A
Majority 598 4.1 N/A
Majority 14,544 78.5 N/A
Registered electors 18,521
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Egerton was elevated to the peerage, becoming 1st Earl of Ellesmere and causing a by-election.

By-election, 21 July 1846: South Lancashire[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical William Brown Unopposed
Radical gain from Conservative
General election 1847: South Lancashire (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical William Brown Unopposed
Radical Charles Pelham Villiers Unopposed
Registered electors 23,630
Radical gain from Conservative
Radical gain from Conservative

Pelham-Villiers was also elected MP for Wolverhampton and opted to sit there, causing a by-election.

By-election, 20 December 1847: South Lancashire[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical Alexander Henry Unopposed
Radical hold
General election 1852: South Lancashire (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical William Brown Unopposed
Radical John Cheetham Unopposed
Registered electors 21,196
Radical hold
Radical hold
General election 1857: South Lancashire (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical William Brown Unopposed
Radical John Cheetham Unopposed
Registered electors 20,460
Radical hold
Radical hold
General election 1859: South Lancashire (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Algernon Egerton 7,470 26.6 N/A
Conservative William Legh 6,983 24.9 N/A
Liberal John Cheetham 6,835 24.4 N/A
Liberal John Pemberton Heywood[14] 6,763 24.1 N/A
Majority 148 0.5 N/A
Turnout 14,026 (est) 72.2 (est) N/A
Registered electors 19,433
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing N/A
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing N/A
  • Third seat created.
By-election, 19 August 1861: South Lancashire[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Turner 9,714 52.2 +0.7
Liberal John Cheetham 8,898 47.8 −0.7
Majority 816 4.4 +3.9
Turnout 18,612 95.8 +23.6
Registered electors 19,433
Conservative win (new seat)
General election 1865: South Lancashire (3 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Algernon Egerton 9,171 18.1 −8.5
Conservative Charles Turner 8,806 17.4 N/A
Liberal William Ewart Gladstone 8,786 17.4 −7.0
Conservative William Legh 8,476 16.8 −8.1
Liberal Henry Yates Thompson 7,703 15.2 N/A
Liberal John Pemberton Heywood[15] 7,653 15.1 −9.0
Turnout 16,865 (est) 78.2 (est) +6.0
Registered electors 21,555
Majority 20 0.0 −0.5
Conservative hold Swing −0.3
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Majority 310 0.6 N/A
Liberal win (new seat)
  • Third seat treated as new for 1865 election.

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 175. ISBN 0-900178-13-2.
  2. ^ a b "The Manchester Courier". 29 December 1832. p. 2. Retrieved 12 May 2019 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  3. ^ Killick, J. R. (21 May 2009) [2004]. "Brown, Sir William, first baronet (1784–1864)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/3662. Retrieved 8 August 2018.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  4. ^ Bourne, Kenneth (1967). Britain and the Balance of Power in North America 1815–1909. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 198. ISBN 978-1597404075. LCCN 67-26632. Retrieved 8 August 2018 – via Google Books.
  5. ^ "Dublin Weekly Register". 11 July 1846. p. 5. Retrieved 8 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  6. ^ Howe, A. C. (8 October 2009) [2004]. "Villiers, Charles Pelham (1802–1898)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/28286. Retrieved 22 July 2018.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  7. ^ "District News". Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser. 26 June 1841. p. 3. Retrieved 22 July 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  8. ^ Swift, Roger (2017). Charles Pelham Villiers: Aristocratic Victorian Radical. Abingdon: Routledge. p. 148. ISBN 978-1-315-26797-5. Retrieved 22 July 2018 – via Google Books.
  9. ^ "Dorset County Chronicle". 23 December 1847. p. 4. Retrieved 8 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. ^ "Local Intelligence". Lancaster Gazette. 24 December 1847. p. 3. Retrieved 8 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. ^ Davis, Michael T., ed. (2015). Crowd Actions in Britain and France from the Middle Ages to the Modern World (Illustrated ed.). Springer. p. 198. ISBN 9781137316516. Retrieved 8 August 2018 – via Google Books.
  12. ^ "Bolton Chronicle". 31 July 1852. p. 8. Retrieved 8 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book)|format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  14. ^ "South Lancashire Election". Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser. 3 May 1859. p. 3. Retrieved 8 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  15. ^ "To the Electors of the Southern Division of the County of Lancaster". Leigh Chronicle and Weekly District Advertiser. 15 July 1865. pp. 1–2. Retrieved 8 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.