Summit County, Colorado

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Summit County, Colorado
Summit County court house in Colorado.jpg
Summit County court house in Breckenridge
Seal of Summit County, Colorado
Seal
Map of Colorado highlighting Summit County
Location in the U.S. state of Colorado
Map of the United States highlighting Colorado
Colorado's location in the U.S.
Founded November 1, 1861
Named for Continental Divide
Seat Breckenridge
Largest town Breckenridge
Area
 • Total 619 sq mi (1,603 km2)
 • Land 608 sq mi (1,575 km2)
 • Water 11 sq mi (28 km2), 1.8%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 30,257
 • Density 46/sq mi (18/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Mountain: UTC-7/-6
Website www.co.summit.co.us

Summit County is one of the 64 counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,994,[1] the county seat is Breckenridge.[2]

Summit County comprises the Breckenridge, CO Micropolitan Statistical Area.[3][4]

History[edit]

Summit County was organized as one of the seventeen original Colorado counties by the First Territorial Legislature on November 1, 1861, it was named for the many mountain summits in the county. Until February 2, 1874, its boundaries included the area now comprising Summit County, Grand County, Routt County, Moffat County, Garfield County, Eagle County, and Rio Blanco County.

In 1874, the northern half of the original Summit County was split off to form Grand County; with the creation of Garfield and Eagle counties in 1883, Summit County arrived at its present boundaries. In addition, Summit County has seen two major boom eras.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 619 square miles (1,600 km2), of which 608 square miles (1,570 km2) is land and 11 square miles (28 km2) (1.8%) is water.[5]

The terrain of the county is mountainous with elevations ranging from 7,957 feet (2,425 m) at Green Mountain Reservoir to 14,270 feet (4,350 m) at Grays Peak. The elevation of the county seat of Breckenridge is 9,602 feet (2,927 m), making it one the highest cities in the state of Colorado and the United States.[6] Much of the county has an Alpine (ET in the Koppen Classification) characterized by tundra vegetation. Breckenridge and other similar elevations in the county have a Subarctic climate (Dfc) characterized by cool summers and abundant snowfall in winter.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 258
1880 5,459 2,015.9%
1890 1,906 −65.1%
1900 2,744 44.0%
1910 2,003 −27.0%
1920 1,724 −13.9%
1930 987 −42.7%
1940 1,754 77.7%
1950 1,135 −35.3%
1960 2,073 82.6%
1970 2,665 28.6%
1980 8,848 232.0%
1990 12,281 38.8%
2000 23,548 91.7%
2010 27,994 18.9%
Est. 2016 30,374 [7] 8.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2015[1]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 23,548 people, 9,120 households, and 4,769 families residing in the county, the population density was 39 people per square mile (15/km2). There were 24,201 housing units at an average density of 40 per square mile (15/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.84% White, 0.68% Black or African American, 0.48% Native American, 0.87% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 3.96% from other races, and 2.10% from two or more races. 9.79% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,120 households out of which 24.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.00% were married couples living together, 4.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.70% were non-families. 21.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 1.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.86.

In the county, the population was spread out with 17.40% under the age of 18, 15.70% from 18 to 24, 44.30% from 25 to 44, 19.40% from 45 to 64, and 3.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years, as of 2014, the life expectancy in Summit County was 86.83 years, the longest average life expectancy of any county in the United States.[13] For every 100 females there were 139.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 144.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $56,587, and the median income for a family was $66,914 (these figures had risen to $65,281 and $80,441 respectively as of a 2007 estimate). Males had a median income of $33,741 versus $27,017 for females, the per capita income for the county was $28,676. About 3.10% of families and 9.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.30% of those under age 18 and 3.40% of those age 65 or over.

The 2012 average real estate prices in Summit County were $708,660 for a single family home, $359,536 for a condo, townhome or duplex and $281,388 for a vacant piece of land (YTD through August 2012).[14]

Snowmelt runoff fills Lake Dillon in Summit County

Life expectancy[edit]

According to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association, residents of Summit County had a 2014 life expectancy from birth of 86.83 years in 2014, the longest in the United States.[15] Both men and women live longer in Summit County than in any other county in the United States: 85.5 years for men and 88.0 years for women is the life expectancy at birth.[16] Two contiguous counties, Pitkin and Eagle counties, rank numbers two and three in the nation in life expectancy.

Factors contributing to the high life expectancy in Summit County are "high education, high income, high access to medical care, the people are physically active, obesity is lower than anywhere else — so you’re doing it right.” said Dr. Ali Mokdad, one of the study’s co-authors.[17]

Politics[edit]

Summit County vote
by party in presidential elections
[18]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 31.5% 5,100 59.1% 9,557 9.4% 1,517
2012 36.4% 5,571 61.0% 9,347 2.6% 394
2008 32.8% 4,883 65.8% 9,802 1.4% 214
2004 39.1% 5,370 59.3% 8,144 1.6% 221
2000 40.6% 4,497 47.9% 5,304 11.5% 1,267
1996 38.7% 3,261 47.2% 3,970 14.1% 1,188
1992 40.0% 3,344 27.0% 2,256 33.1% 2,770
1988 51.4% 2,893 46.1% 2,595 2.4% 136
1984 66.1% 3,253 32.3% 1,588 1.6% 77
1980 46.5% 2,027 29.5% 1,285 23.9% 1,043
1976 58.2% 1,826 34.6% 1,087 7.2% 227
1972 59.0% 1,082 38.6% 707 2.4% 44
1968 57.4% 536 32.2% 301 10.4% 97
1964 41.6% 344 58.3% 483 0.1% 1
1960 51.3% 424 48.4% 400 0.4% 3
1956 64.6% 429 35.4% 235 0.0% 0
1952 61.9% 442 38.0% 271 0.1% 1
1948 43.3% 292 56.0% 378 0.7% 5
1944 57.6% 326 41.9% 237 0.5% 3
1940 46.8% 479 52.7% 540 0.5% 5
1936 34.9% 268 64.5% 496 0.7% 5
1932 34.8% 224 61.7% 397 3.6% 23
1928 53.2% 362 44.9% 306 1.9% 13
1924 47.5% 354 32.4% 241 20.1% 150
1920 50.4% 418 46.8% 388 2.9% 24
1916 26.3% 268 70.3% 717 3.4% 35
1912 18.6% 179 62.2% 600 19.3% 186

Communities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Ghost town[edit]

Recreation[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Ski areas[edit]

Trails and byways[edit]

Lakes[edit]

The county has two reservoirs, Lake Dillon and Green Mountain Reservoir, that are also popular recreation sites.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Gold specimen from the Breckenridge Mining District
  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "OMB Bulletin No. 10-02: Update of Statistical Area Definitions and Guidance on Their Uses" (PDF). United States Office of Management and Budget. December 1, 2009. Retrieved April 19, 2012. 
  4. ^ See the Colorado census statistical areas.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Elevation distribution for all U.S. cities," http://www.city-data.com/top13.html, accessed 2 Aug 2017
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 11, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  13. ^ University of Washington. "US Health Map". Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Retrieved 2017-05-08. 
  14. ^ Brewer, Brewer; Ben Brewer; Kate Brewer (2012-09-27). "Summit County Real Estate". Team-Brewer Market Trends. Ben Brewer. Retrieved 2012-09-27. 
  15. ^ Dwyer-Lindgren, Laura (8 May 2017). "Inequalities in Life Expectancy Among US Counties, 1980 to 2014". Journal of the American Medical Association: Internal Medicine. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.0918. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 
  16. ^ "County Profile: Summit County Colorado," http://www.healthdata.org/sites/default/files/files/county_profiles/US/2015/County_Report_Summit_County_Colorado.pdf, accessed 2 Aug 2017
  17. ^ Achenbach, Joel, "U.S. life expectancy varies more than 20 years from county to county," Washington Post, May 8, 2017
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°30′N 106°03′W / 39.50°N 106.05°W / 39.50; -106.05