Sun Metro Brio

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Sun Metro Brio logo.svg
Overview
OperatorSun Metro
StatusOperational
Began serviceOctober 27, 2014 (2014-10-27)
Route
Route typeBus rapid transit
LocaleEl Paso
Length8.6 miles
Stations22
Service
Frequency10–15 minutes
Weekend frequency20 minutes on Saturdays
No service on Sundays
Route map

Diagram 4.png

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Brio is a bus rapid transit system in El Paso, Texas, United States. It is operated by Sun Metro.

The first line, the Mesa Corridor, began operating in the fall of 2014, though opening was originally scheduled for July;[1] this line is 8.6 miles (13.8 km) long and uses 22 purpose-built curbside stations with shelters, ticket vending machines for pre-boarding payment, and real-time arrival information. Three additional lines are currently under construction; when these lines are completed the entire system will be 50.1 miles (80.6 km) in length with 98 stations.[2]

Description[edit]

Each Brio corridor contains at least two transfer centers, where passengers can transfer between Brio and local buses. Outside of transfer centers, stops consist of curbside shelters with the following amenities:[2]

  • Free WiFi
  • Translucent panels for better lighting
  • Bike racks
  • Shade screens
  • Electronic real-time displays
  • Ticket vending machine (TVM)
  • Solar-powered compacting trash can
  • Displays of unique public artwork

The Brio fleet consists of 60-foot-long (18 m) branded New Flyer Xcelsior articulated buses powered by compressed natural gas, able to carry 72 total passengers and feature on-board WiFi, interior bike racks, and passenger information monitors;[3] each bus also contains three doors to facilitate a quicker boarding process.[4]

The vehicles operate in mixed traffic. Signal prioritization is used to lengthen green traffic signals and reduce delays; the frequency of Brio buses range from 10 minutes during weekday rush hours to 15 minutes mid-day from Monday to Friday, and 20 minutes on Saturdays; buses do not run on Sundays or holidays. Stations are located about a mile apart. Passengers can buy a one-way trip, a day pass, a weekly pass or a monthly pass from the ticket vending machine located at all permanent Brio stations. To prevent fare evasion, Brio Ambassadors will be monitoring and requesting proof of payment during trips on Brio.[2]

Over 50,000 people use Brio every month, which has meant that approximately 20 tonnes of carbon dioxide was not emitted in the first year of its operation. Brio has also inspired new businesses; around 20 have been launched since Brio was launched as of 2016.[4]

Naming the system[edit]

Sun Metro hired PAVLOV, a marketing communications company, to develop the system name and logo; the word Brio is Spanish for excitement, verve and energy.[2]

The logo was designed to complement the circular nature of Sun Metro's current logo; the ‘b’ and ‘o’ in Brio are a graphic element that can be used to extend the identity of the RTS system. The movement within the logotype references the wheels on the vehicles. In addition to the name and logo, Sun Metro selected a color palette and graphic standards to make Brio stations and buses distinctive and easily recognizable.

Fares[edit]

Fares for Brio are the same as standard fare on other Sun Metro lines.[2] Currently, the fare is $1.50; $0.30 for seniors 65+. disabled and Medicare.[5]

Lines[edit]

Mesa Corridor[edit]

  • Length: about 8.6 miles (13.8 km)
  • Beginning of route: Downtown Transfer Center
  • End of route: Westside Transfer Center
  • Total number of buses: 10
  • Number of stations: 22
  • Total project cost: $27.1 million
  • FTA funding: $15.6 million
  • TXDOT funding: $5.5 million
  • Operational: currently operational[2]

Alameda Corridor[edit]

  • Length: 14.5 miles (23.3 km)
  • Beginning of route: Downtown Transfer Center
  • End of route: Mission Valley Transfer Center
  • Total number of buses: 14
  • Number of stations: 29
  • Total construction project cost: $38.3 million
  • Funding: 100 percent City of El Paso
  • Operational: Mid-2018[2]

Dyer Corridor[edit]

  • Length: 10.2 miles (16.4 km)
  • Beginning of route: Downtown Transfer Center
  • End of route: Future Northeast Transfer Center
  • Total number of buses: 10
  • Number of stations: 22
  • Total project cost: $35.9 million
  • FTA funding (anticipated): $21.7 million
  • TXDOT funding: $6.6 million
  • Operational: Late 2018[2]

Montana Corridor[edit]

  • Length: 16.8 miles (27.0 km)
  • Beginning of route: Five Points Terminal
  • End of route: Future Far East Side Transfer Center
  • Total no. of buses: 14
  • Number of stations: 25
  • Total project cost: $47 million
  • FTA funding (anticipated): $29.5 million
  • TXDOT funding: $8 million
  • Operational: Late 2019[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Crowder, David (19 January 2014). "Sun Metro Brio buses roll out in July". El Paso Inc. Retrieved 12 December 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Brio". Sun Metro.
  3. ^ "Texas agency showcases new station, buses". Metro Magazine. May 27, 2014. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  4. ^ a b Schroeder, Margaret; Asce, M.; Roberts, Chris (16 August 2016). "BRT Benefits in El Paso". Mass Transit. Retrieved 12 December 2017.
  5. ^ "Fare Information". Brio. Sun Metro.