SusQ Cyber Charter School

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SusQ-Cyber Charter School
Address
240 Market Street, Suite 15,
Bloomsburg, Columbia County, Pennsylvania 17815
United States
Information
Type Public cyber charter school
Motto Pennsylvania's First Cyber Charter School
Founded initially approved August 1998, charter renewed January 2015 through the end of the 2019-2020 school year[1]
Opened 1998
Founder Berwick Area School District, Bloomsburg Area School District and Milton Area School District in conjunction with the Board of Trustees
School board locally selected Board of Trustees
Oversight Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit 16, Pennsylvania Department of Education
Principal

Patricia Leighow, Chief Executive Officer (2014)

former principal/CEO Karin Lynn Shipman salary $89,266 (2013)
Staff 11 non teaching staff members[2]
Faculty 15 teachers (2014),[3] 15 teachers (2011)[4]
Grades 9th though 12th
Age 14 years old to 19 years old
Pupils

103 pupils (2016)[5]
119 pupils (2015)[6]
153 pupils (2014)[7]
178 pupils (2013-14)[8]
155 pupils (2012-13)[9]
178 pupils (2011-12)[10]
72 pupils (2009-10)[11]

194 Pupil (2006-07)
 • Grade 9 16 (2015),[12] 26 (2012), 17 (2010)
 • Grade 10 20 (2015), 31 (2012), 21 (2010)
 • Grade 11 27 (2015), 41 (2012), 13 (2010)
 • Grade 12 40 (2015), 57 (2013), 21 (2010)[13]
Language English
Accreditation Pennsylvania Department of Education
Tuition None billed to student. All tuition is state/district funded through school tax dollars.
Website

Susq-Cyber Charter School is a small, public, cyber charter school whose headquarters are located in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. The school offers grades 9th through 12th. Students residing in any region of Pennsylvania may enroll in the school. The curriculum and instruction is internet based. Teachers are available to pupils, during traditional school day hours via phone and internet. There is no charge to the students or parents. The pupil's public school of residency pays tuition to the charter school each year, on a per pupil attending basis. The amount paid is set each year by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. It is based on the home school district's own per-pupil spending.[14] Susq-Cyber Charter School is one of 14 public, cyber charter schools operating in Pennsylvania in 2014.

SusQ-Cyber School follows many of the same mandates as traditional school districts, with the additional requirements of providing an Annual Report to the Pennsylvania Department of Education and reports mandated by Pennsylvania Act 88 of 2002 Cyber Charter School Law. Pennsylvania's public, cyber charter schools are subject to annual office site visits by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.[15] Like several very small Pennsylvania public school district, Susq-Cyber Charter School's CEO serves as a combined principal and superintendent.

In January 2015, the Pennsylvania Department of Education approved the renewal of the charter of the school despite its poor academic record. The PDE reserved the right to revoke the charter if the school does not show progress in improving the pupils' academic achievement, closing the achievement gap by stipulated amounts each school year. The Charter has been renewed through June 30, 2020.[16] The request by the school to expand to offer 7th and 8th grade was denied. The school's administration was required to develop a plan to raise student achievement and submit it to the PDE.

In 2016, enrollment was reported as 103 pupils in 9th through 12th grades, with 64% of pupils eligible for a free lunch due to the family meeting the federal federal poverty level. Additionally, 17% of pupils received special education services, while none of the pupils were identified as gifted.[17] The school employed 11 teachers.[18] Per the PA Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[19]

In 2014, 153 pupils were enrolled in grades 9th through 12th, with 63% from low income homes. Additionally, 22% received special education services, while none were identified as gifted. All of the teachers were described as Highly Qualified as defined by No Child Left Behind.[20]

In 2013, Susq-Cyber Charter School reported 155 pupils in grades 9th through 12th, with 62% from low income homes.[21] Additionally, 19% of pupils received special education services, while none or the pupils were identified as gifted. The student population was Females - 65%, Males 34%. Per the PA Department of Education 100% of the teachers were rated Highly Qualified under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

During the 2007-08 school year, the SusQ-Cyber Charter School provided educational services to 306 pupils from 70 sending school districts. The school employed 10 teachers, 6 full-time and part-time support personnel, and 2 administrators. The SusQ-Cyber Charter School received $43,373 in state funding in school year 2007-08. For the school year which ended June 30, 2006, the SusQ-Cyber Charter School provided educational services to 194 students from 34 sending school districts. The school employed: 1 administrator, 8 teachers, and 3 full-time and part-time support personnel.[22]

All students are assigned a Distance Learning Monitor who checks their progress and remains in contact with them through emails, on-line chats through the programs or by phone. Teachers are available to tutor students, to review what their problem areas are, and to set up plans for achievement that the student can follow between tutoring sessions. Tutoring sessions may be held on line using Elluminate or teachers may meet with students either at the testing centers or at various locations throughout the state which include libraries in the students home area, at university library facilities or at community centers.

History[edit]

In 1997, five local school districts met with members of the Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit (CSIU16) to discuss establishing a cyber entity. Three of the original five school districts approved the charter that created the SusQ-Cyber Charter School in 1998 (Berwick Area School District, Bloomsburg Area School District and Milton Area School District). In 2002, Pennsylvania Act 88 required all charter schools to be chartered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.[23] The overriding focus was for the school to deliver an educational program to primarily at-risk high school students who are trying to obtain their high school diploma. In 2003, the SusQ-Cyber Charter School was re-chartered as a public school district for grades 9-12 for an additional 5 years. For its first five years, the school was open exclusively to students in the CSIU16 region. In 2005, enrollment opened to all Pennsylvania students who meets the residence and age requirements of Pennsylvania law.

Initially, the school provided courses that were not available in their traditional district's high school. Over time the program has evolved to serve students who are underserved by the traditional local public schools. This includes students who are pregnant and students who need to work to support themselves, for example. Other students have medical problems such as auto-immune deficiency, cancer, or asthma that lead to them missing a significant number of schools days, due to illness or therapy appointments. Another group of students are gifted. They seek cyber school after leaving their traditional school to accelerate their studies. They may have entered college with advanced standing, but have a course requirement outstanding to earn their high school diploma. Some public school principals have reported referring potential drop out to the school to finish their public education and earn a high school diploma.[24]

Graduation rate[edit]

In 2017, Susq-Cyber Charter School ’s graduation rate increased to 29.82%.[25]

In 2008, Susq-Cyber Charter School reported graduating 47 students. The school has had a total of 180 graduates in the past 10 years.[33]

Graduation requirements

In 2007-08, the school's board of trustees established higher graduation requirements, including: Science 4 credits, Social Studies 4 credits, Mathematics 4 credits and English 4 credits. The total number of required credits to graduate was set at 22.5 credits. Electives required include 2 credits in the arts and the humanities plus 2.5 additional credits. health and Physical Education remained at 1.5 credits and .5 credit for the graduation project course.

By law, all Pennsylvania secondary school students were required to complete a project as a part of their eligibility to graduate from high school. The type of project, its rigor and its expectations are set by the individual school district.[34] Effective with the graduating class of 2017, the Pennsylvania State Board of Education eliminated the state mandate that students complete a culminating project in order to graduate.[35]

By Pennsylvania State School Board regulations, beginning with the class of 2020,[36][37] public school students must demonstrate successful completion of secondary level course work in Algebra I, Biology, and English Literature by passing the respective Keystone Exams for each course.[38][39] The exam is given at the end of the course. Keystone Exams have replaced the PSSAs for 11th grade.[40]

Students have several opportunities to pass the Keystone Exams. Schools are mandated to provide targeted assistance to help the student be successful. Those who do not pass after several attempts can perform a project in order to graduate.[41][42] The original intent was to gradually add seven more exams including civics and geometry. In 2017, the Pennsylvania General Assembly passed legislation that eliminated developing any more Keystone Exams in other subjects.[43] In 2011, Pennsylvania high school students field tested the Algebra 1, Biology and English Lit exams. The statewide results were: Algebra 1 38% on grade level, Biology 35% on grade level and English Lit - 49% on grade level.[44] Individual student, school or district reports were not made public, although they were reported to district officials by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students identified as having special needs and qualifying for an Individual Educational Program (IEP) may graduate by meeting the requirements of their IEP. School district superintendents have the discretion to graduate up to 10% of pupils who do not pass the exams or project.

AYP history[edit]

The Susq-Cyber Charter School remained in Warning Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) status for the 2011-12 school year.[45]

  • 2012 - declined to Corrective Action II status level 4th year due to low graduation rate and chronic, low student academic achievement[46]
  • 2011 - declined to Corrective Action II status level 3rd year[47]
  • 2010 - declined to Corrective Action II status level 2nd year[48]
  • 2009 - Making Progress Corrective Action II status level
  • 2008 - declined to Corrective Action II status level[49]
  • 2007 - declined to Corrective Action I status level[50]
  • 2006 - declined to School Improvement II level
  • 2005 - declined to School Improvement I level
  • 2004 - Warning AYP level due to low graduation rate and lagging student achievement.

Academic Achievement[edit]

2017 School Performance Profile[edit]

The School's SPP was reported by the PDE at 46 out of 100 points.[51] SusQ Cyber Charter School Keystone Exams mandated testing results were: 50% of the 14 students tested were on grade level in reading/literature and only 29% of students demonstrated on grade level in Algebra I. In Biology I, 36% of pupils demonstrated on grade level science understanding at the end of the Biology course.[52][53] Statewide 72.7% of students who took the Keystone Reading/Literature exam were on grade level or advanced. In Algebra 1, 65.6% demonstarted on grade level skills. In Biology I,63.4% of students who took a biology course showed on grade level understanding of concepts.[54][55]

2016 School Performance Profile[edit]

SPP 49.5 out of 100 points. SusQ Cyber Charter School Keystone Exams mandated testing results were: 63% of students were on grade level in reading/literature and just 40% of students demonstrated on grade level in Algebra I. In Biology I, only 26% of pupils demonstrated on grade level science understanding at the end of the Biology course.[56] The requirement that pupils pass the Keystone Exams in reading, algebra I and bIology I in order to graduate was postponed until 2019 by the Pennsylvania General Assembly because less than 60% of 12 grade pupils statewide would have been eligible for graduation from high school due to failing one or more Keystone Exams.[57] Fifty-four percent of the 2,676 public schools in Pennsylvania achieved a passing score of 70 or better.[58]

2015 School Performance Profile[edit]

SusQ-Cyber Charter School achieved 45.5 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement. In reading/literature - 55% were on grade level. In Algebra 1, 33.33% showed on grade level skills at the end of the course. In Biology, 19.05% showed on grade level science understanding at the end of the course.[59] Statewide, 53 percent of schools with an eleventh grade achieved an academic score of 70 or better. Five percent of the 2,033 schools with 11th grade were scored at 90 and above; 20 percent were scored between 80 and 89; 28 percent between 70 and 79; 25 percent between 60 and 69 and 22 percent below 60. The Keystone Exam results showed: 73 percent of students statewide scored at grade-level in English, 64 percent in Algebra I and 59 percent in biology.[60][61]

2014 School Performance Profile[edit]

SusQ-Cyber Charter School achieved 42.4 out of 100. In reading/literature - 35% were on grade level. In Algebra 1, 29% showed on grade level skills at the end of the course. In Biology, 23.8% showed on grade level science understanding at the end of the course.[62][63] According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2,134 of 2,947 Pennsylvania public schools (72 percent of Pennsylvania public schools), achieved an academic score of 70 or higher.[64] Fifty-three percent of schools statewide received lower SPP scores compared with last year's, while 46 percent improved. A handful were unchanged.[65][66] Compared with last year, the percentage of schools that earned below 60 declined by nearly 1 percent per Secretay of Education Carolyn Dumaresq. She reported that this is an indication that student achievement is improving as school resources are being used better.[67]

2013 School Performance Profile[edit]

Susq-Cyber Charter School achieved 46.4 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement on the state PSSAs and Keystone Exams. In reading/literature - 66% were on grade level. In Algebra 1, just 33% showed on grade level algebra skills. In Biology, just 26% showed on grade level science understanding.[68] According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2,181 public schools (less than 73 percent of Pennsylvania public schools), achieved an academic score of 70 or higher. In 2013, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania changed its high school assessments to the Keystone Exams in Algebra 1, Reading/literature and Biology1. The exams are given at the end of the course, rather than all in the spring of the student's 11th grade year. Charter school students and cyber charter school students are required to take the Keystone Exams and PSSAs just like their traditional school peers.[69]

In 2011, Susq-Cyber Charter School was noted as having the lowest achievement of cyber charter schools in Pennsylvania in a New York Times article.[70]

PSSA results[edit]

Like all other public schools, Charter and Cyber Charter Schools are responsible for their students taking the PSSA’s and are held accountable under the federal No Child Left Behind law. Eleventh grade Pennsylvania System of School Assessments are No Child Left Behind Act related examinations which were administered from 2003 through 2012.

11th Grade Reading:

  • 2012 - 38% on grade level, (36% below basic). State - 67% of 11th graders are on grade level.[71]
  • 2012 - 43% on grade level, (33% below basic). State - 69%[72]
  • 2010 - 25% on grade level, (38% below basic). State - 66%[73]
  • 2009 - 47% on grade level, (26% below basic). State - 65% [74]
  • 2008 - 60% on grade level (16% below basic). State - 65% [75]

11th Grade Math:

  • 2012 - 29% on grade level, (51% below basic). In Pennsylvania, 59% of 11th graders are on grade level.[76]
  • 2011 - 21% on grade level, (54% below basic). State - 60%[77]
  • 2010 - 12% on grade level, (67% below basic). State - 59%[78]
  • 2009 - 36% on grade level, (47% below basic). State - 56%[79]
  • 2008 - 8% on grade level (58% below basic). State - 56% [80]

11th Grade Science:

  • 2012 - 25% on grade level (25% below basic). State - 42% of 11th graders were on grade level.[81]
  • 2011 - 11% on grade level (35% below basic). State - 40%
  • 2010 - 7% on grade level, (45% below basic). State - 40%
  • 2009 - 36.8% (21% below basic). State - 40% [82]
  • 2008 - 35% (7% below basic). State - 39% [83]

ACE[edit]

SusQ Cyber Charter School students have access to Bloomsburg University's Summer College and Advanced College Experience (ACE) during the summer of their sophomore, junior and senior years (after high school graduation). Tuition is deeply discounted to 75% of the regular student rate.[84] Successful students earn college credits that can be readily transferred to other Pennsylvania public colleges and universities through the Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Center (PA TRAC) system.[85]

Penn College NOW[edit]

SusQ Cyber Charter School does not participate in the Penn College NOW dual enrollment program in conjunction with Pennsylvania College of Technology. Penn College NOW classes are taught by approved high school teachers at the high school.[86] Penn College NOW is partially funded by the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-270) through the Pennsylvania Department of Education, by the support of Pennsylvania companies through the Educational Improvement Tax Credit program managed by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development and by Pennsylvania College of Technology.

SAT scores[edit]

In 2016, one pupil attending SusQ Cyber Charter School took the SATs. The results were not published in order to protect the student's privacy.[87]

In 2015, one pupil attending SusQ Cyber Charter School took the SATs. The results were not published in order to protect the student's privacy.[88]

In 2014, less than 10 pupils at SusQ Cyber Charter School students took the SAT exams. Results were withheld to protect student privacy. Statewide in Pennsylvania, Verbal Average Score was 497. The Math average score was 504. The Writing average score was 480. The College Board also reported that nationwide scores were: 497 in reading, 513 in math and 487 in writing.[89]

In 2013, 5 pupils at SusQ Cyber Charter School students took the SAT exams. Results were withheld from publication to protect student privacy. In 2012, 4 pupils attending SusQ Cyber Charter School students took the SAT exams. Their results were withheld from public publication to protect each student's privacy. In 2011, six SusQ Cyber Charter School students took the SAT exams.

The Center for Rural Pennsylvania, a research arm of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, compared the SAT data of students in rural areas of Pennsylvania to students in urban areas. From 2003 to 2005, the average total SAT score for students in rural Pennsylvania was 992, while urban students averaged 1,006. During the same period, 28 percent of 11th and 12th graders in rural school districts took the exam, compared to 32 percent of urban students in the same grades. The average math and verbal scores were 495 and 497, respectively, for rural students, while urban test-takers averaged 499 and 507, respectively. Pennsylvania’s SAT composite score ranked low on the national scale in 2004. The composite SAT score of 1,003 left Pennsylvania ranking 44 out of the 50 states and Washington, DC.[90]

AP Courses[edit]

SusQ Cyber Charter School does not offer AP courses to its pupils.

Tuition rate[edit]

Charter and Cyber Charter Schools are funded with state and local education funds through a tuition rate at 70-80% of a traditional public school funding.

In 2011, Berwick Area School District paid $9,792.91 per pupil in tuition for pupils attending Pennsylvania public charter schools and, including Susq-Cyber Charter School. The district's per-pupil spending was reported as $11,209.[91]

Bloomsburg Area School District paid $8,924.30 per pupil in tuition for pupils attending charter schools. The district's internal per-pupil spending was $11,647.20.[92]

Milton Area School District paid $9,058.70 per pupil in tuition for pupils attending charter schools. The district's internal per-pupil spending was $12,204.50 (2010).

For special education students, the charter school receives for each student enrolled the same funding as for each non-special education student, plus an additional amount determined by dividing the district of residence's total special education expenditure by the product of multiplying the combined percentage of the special education payment times the district of residence's total average daily membership for the prior school year.[93]

The By-laws of SusQ-Cyber Charter School contained a provision that excess funds from tuition may be returned to the school districts based on their contributions. In 2002, the Charter School returned $225,025.74 to the sending districts.[94]

Health[edit]

The school employs a part-time school nurse who maintains student health records including mandated immunization and screenings and makes mandated reports to the Pennsylvania Department of Education and Pennsylvania Department of Health. The nurse coordinates the required 11th grade physical examinations. Since the students do not physically attend school at the offices of the Cyber School the nurse must coordinate and schedule physical examinations and the yearly height, weight, vision, and hearing screenings for students and arrange for the school doctor to conduct physicals.[95] Parents utilize the family physician to meet the 11th grade physical examination requirement. Alternatively, the SusQ-Cyber Charter School has contracted with Geisinger Health Systems for school physician services to conduct 11th grade physicals.[96]

Beginning with the 2017-18 school year, high school students are mandated to receive a dose of MCV meningococcal conjugate vaccine for 12th grade entry.[97]

Extracurriculars[edit]

By Pennsylvania law, Kindergarten -12th grade students residing in a public school district, including those who attend a private nonpublic school, public cyber charter school, a bricks and mortar public charter school and those who are homeschooled, are all eligible to participate in the extracurricular programs of their resident district, including all athletics. They must meet the same eligibility rules as the students enrolled in the public district's schools.[98]

See also[edit]

Charter schools in the United States

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Ed Names and Addresses, 2014
  2. ^ National Center for Education Statistics (2014). "District Details 2011-2012 school year". 
  3. ^ US News & World Report (2014). "SusQ-Cyber Charter School Overview". 
  4. ^ National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data - SUSQ Cyber Charter School, 2012
  5. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 14, 2016). "Susq Cyber Charter School Performance report Fast Facts 2016". 
  6. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 4, 2015). "Susq Cyber Charter School Performance report Fast Facts 2015". 
  7. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 6, 2014). "Susq Cyber Charter School Performance report Fast Facts 2014". 
  8. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Susq Cyber Charter School Performance report Fast Facts 2013, October 2013
  9. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Susq Cyber Charter School Performance report fast facts 2013, December 5, 2013
  10. ^ National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data SusQ Cyber Charter School, 2013
  11. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Enrollment and Projections by LEA, July 2010
  12. ^ PDE, Enrollment by LEA, 2016
  13. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2014). "Charter School Annual Reports and Enrollment Data". Archived from the original on 2015-01-11. 
  14. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2015). "Tuition Rate Calculation". 
  15. ^ Charter Schools Office (2014). "Cyber Charter Schools". Archived from the original on 2014-07-20. 
  16. ^ Carolyn C. Dumaresq, Ed.D Sec of Education, SusQ 2012 Renewal Decision, January 2015
  17. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 4, 2015). "SusQ Cyber Charter School Fast Facts 2015". 
  18. ^ US News and World Report, Best High Schools, 2016
  19. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2015). "Highly Qualified Teacher Guidelines". Archived from the original on 2016-06-24. 
  20. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 6, 2014). "School Performance Fast Facts - Susq-Cyber Charter School". 
  21. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, School Performance Fast Facts - Susq-Cyber Charter School, October 4, 2013
  22. ^ Pennsylvania Auditor General, Performance Audit Susq Cyber Charter School, August 14, 2008
  23. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2014). "Cyber Charter Regulation". Archived from the original on 2014-03-25. 
  24. ^ Susq-Cyber Charter School, Susq-Cyber Charter School Annual report, November 2008
  25. ^ PDE, Graduation rate by LEA, 2017
  26. ^ PDE, Graduation rate by LEA, 2016
  27. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 4, 2015). "Susq-Cyber Charter School Academic Performance Profile 2015". 
  28. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 6, 2014). "Susq-Cyber Charter School Academic Performance Profile 2014". 
  29. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Susq-Cyber Charter School Academic Performance Profile 2013, October 4, 2013
  30. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Susq-Cyber Charter School AYP Data table 2012, September 21, 2012
  31. ^ MARY BETH SCHWEIGERT & CHIP SMEDLEY (November 11, 2012). "CYBER-CHARTERS: Cyber-charter pupils not connecting well on Pa. tests". Lancaster Online. 
  32. ^ Local School Directory, Susq-Cyber Charter School, 2014
  33. ^ Susq-Cyber Charter School administration, Susq-Cyber Charter School annual report, November 10, 2008
  34. ^ Pennsylvania State Board of Education. "Pennsylvania Code §4.24 (a) High school graduation requirements". 
  35. ^ Pennsylvania State Board of Education, Proposed changes to Chapter 4, May 10, 2012
  36. ^ Jan Murphy (February 3, 2016). "Wolf signs bill to suspend use of Keystone Exams as a graduation requirement". Pennlive.com. 
  37. ^ Pennlive.com (July 12, 2017). "School code bill awaiting action". 
  38. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2010). "Keystone Exam Overview" (PDF). 
  39. ^ Associated Press (January 20, 2016). "State moves ahead with plan to delay Keystone Exams as graduation requirement". 
  40. ^ Megan Harris (September 12, 2013). "Pennsylvania changing high school graduation requirements". Tribune Live. 
  41. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 2011). "Pennsylvania Keystone Exams Overview". 
  42. ^ Pennsylvania State Board of Education (2010). "Rules and Regulation Title 22 PA School Code CH. 4". 
  43. ^ PA General Assembly, Act 6 of 2017, June 21, 2017
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  46. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, AYP History by LEA and School, 2013
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  49. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Susq-Cyber Charter School AYP Overview 2008, August 15, 2008
  50. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Susq-Cyber Charter School AYP Overview 2007, 2007
  51. ^ PDE, (October 31, 2017). "SusQ Cyber School - School Performance Profile 2017". 
  52. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 27, 2017). "2017 KEYSTONE Exam Results". 
  53. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 27, 2017). "2017 KEYSTONE Exam Results". 
  54. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 27, 2017). "2017 Keystone Exam State Level Data". 
  55. ^ Jan Murphy (September 27, 2017). "State exam scores show math continues to be a struggle for many students". Pennlive.com. 
  56. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 29, 2016). "2016 PSSA AND KEYSTONE Results". 
  57. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (August 2016). "Findings and Recommendations Pursuant to Act 1 of 2016" (PDF). 
  58. ^ Jan Murphy (October 16, 2016). "How District schools fared overall". 
  59. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 6, 2014). "SusQ-Cyber Charter School Academic Performance Data 2014". 
  60. ^ Jan Murphy (November 4, 2015). "Report card for state's high schools show overall decline". Pennlive.com. 
  61. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 4, 2015). "2015 Keystone Exam School Level Data". 
  62. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 6, 2014). "SusQ-Cyber Charter School Academic Performance Data 2014". 
  63. ^ Evamarie Socha (November 6, 2014). "Half of Valley districts see state test scores decline". The Daily Item. 
  64. ^ Acting Secretary of Education Carolyn Dumaresq, Acting Secretary of Education Announces Results of 2013-14 School Performance Profile; Strong Performance in 72 Percent of Schools, November 6, 2014
  65. ^ Kathy Boccella; Dylan Purcell & Kristen A. Graham (November 6, 2014). "Pa. school rankings: Downingtown STEM No. 1; Phila. falters". The Philadelphia Inquirer. 
  66. ^ Jan Murphy (November 6, 2014). "More Pa. school scores decline than improve, state report card shows". Pennlive.com. 
  67. ^ Evamarie Socha (November 6, 2014). "Half of Valley districts see state test scores decline". 
  68. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (October 4, 2013). "SusQ-Cyber Charter School Academic Performance Data 2013". 
  69. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2014). "PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL PERFORMANCE PROFILE Frequently Asked Questions". 
  70. ^ New York Times (December 12, 2011). "Lagging in Performance: Pennsylvania Online Schools". 
  71. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 29, 2012). "2011-2012 PSSA and AYP Results". 
  72. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 21, 2012). "SusQ-Cyber Charter School Academic Achievement Report Card 2012" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on April 13, 2014. 
  73. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2010). "2009-2010 PSSA and AYP Results". 
  74. ^ The Times-Tribune (September 14, 2009). "Grading Our Schools database, 2009 PSSA results". 
  75. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (August 15, 2008). "2007-2008 PSSA and AYP Results". 
  76. ^ "How is your school doing?". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. October 15, 2012. 
  77. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, SusQ-Cyber Charter School Academic Achievement Report Card 2011, September 29, 2011
  78. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, SusQ-Cyber Charter School Academic Achievement Report Card 2010, October 20, 2010
  79. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, SusQ-Cyber Charter School Academic Achievement Report Card 2009, September 14, 2009
  80. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, SusQ-Cyber Charter School Academic Achievement Report Card 2008, August 15, 2008
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  82. ^ The Times-Tribune (2009). "Grading Our Schools database, 2009 Science PSSA results". 
  83. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2008). "Report on PSSA Science results by school and grade 2008". 
  84. ^ Bloomsburg University Administration (2013). "High School Students (ACE)". 
  85. ^ Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (March 2010). "Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Agreement". 
  86. ^ Pennsylvania College of Technology administration (2014). "Penn College NOW Dual Enrollment". 
  87. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2016). "SAT and AP Scores 2016". 
  88. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2015). "SAT and AP Scores 2015". 
  89. ^ College Board (2014). "2014 College-Bound Seniors State Profile Report" (PDF). 
  90. ^ The Center for Rural Pennsylvania (August 2006). "SAT Scores and Other School Data". 
  91. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Tuition rate by LEA 2011, 2011
  92. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (May 2012). "Pennsylvania Public School District Tuition Rates". 
  93. ^ Democratic House Education Committee (March 2013). "Charter and Cyber Charter School Reform Update and Comprehensive Reform Legislation" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-12-29. 
  94. ^ James Street SusQ-Cyber Charter School Administration, SusQ-Cyber Charter School Charter Renewal Application, June 16, 2003
  95. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Health (2014). "Mandated School Health Screenings". Archived from the original on 2015-06-07. 
  96. ^ SusQ-Cyber Charter School administration, Student Handbook Health Policy, 2003
  97. ^ PA Department of Health (2017). "Procedure Manual School Immunization Regulations" (PDF). 
  98. ^ Pennsylvania Office of the Governor Press Release (November 10, 2005). "Home-Schooled, Charter School Children Can Participate in School District Extracurricular Activities". 

Coordinates: 41°00′05″N 76°27′28″W / 41.00139°N 76.45771°W / 41.00139; -76.45771