Talk:Zoroastrianism

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Former good articleZoroastrianism was one of the Philosophy and religion good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
May 7, 2006Peer reviewReviewed
June 16, 2006Good article nomineeListed
May 6, 2009Good article reassessmentDelisted
August 11, 2009Peer reviewReviewed
Current status: Delisted good article
Wikipedia Version 1.0 Editorial Team / v0.5 / Vital (Rated C-class)
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Semi-protected edit request on 26 September 2017[edit]

Change "there number is declining" to "their number is declining". 2601:645:C100:5EA8:28BB:6623:A72C:992C (talk) 06:17, 26 September 2017 (UTC)

Done DRAGON BOOSTER 06:39, 26 September 2017 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 27 September 2017[edit]

Due to duplication, change:

In 2011 the Tehran Mobeds Anjuman announced that for the first time in the history of Iran and of the Zoroastrian communities worldwide, women had been ordained in Iran and North America as mobedyars, meaning women mobeds (Zoroastrian priests).[57][58][59] In 2011, the Tehran Mobeds Anjuman (Anjoman-e-Mobedan) announced that for the first time in the history of Iran and of the Zoroastrian communities worldwide, women had joined the group of mobeds (priests) in Iran as mobedyars (women priests); the women hold official certificates and can perform the lower-rung religious functions and can initiate people into the religion.

to:

In 2011 the Tehran Mobeds Anjuman announced that for the first time in the history of Iran and of the Zoroastrian communities worldwide, women had been ordained in Iran and North America as mobedyars, meaning women mobeds (Zoroastrian priests).[57][58][59] The women hold official certificates and can perform the lower-rung religious functions and can initiate people into the religion. PhilippJFR (talk) 01:53, 27 September 2017 (UTC)

Done Gulumeemee (talk) 05:32, 27 September 2017 (UTC)

"Iranian" prophet? or "Persian" prophet[edit]

Shouldn't it really be ascribed to the teachings of the Persian prophet Zoroaster and pre-Islamic Persian empires not Iranian Empires

He was not born in or during Persian Empire.--Miki Filigranski (talk) 18:41, 15 December 2017 (UTC)

Zoroastrianism's influence on other religions is not determinable; add historical context.[edit]

In the first paragraph of this article, it is indicated that Zoroastrianism influenced other religions but does not provide context. The article presents itself as disingenuous regarding the Zoroastrianism's influence on other religions without providing full historical context.

Suggest appending the following information to the first paragraph:

"It is hard to prove either that Zoroastrianism influenced Christianity or that Judaism influenced Zoroastrianism. It is even harder to prove that these religions did NOT influence each other. What can be stated is that the patriarchs of Judaism, Abraham and Moses, lived long before the prophets Zoroaster, Muhammad, and Jesus Christ. The Mosaic Law, the Psalms of David and many of Judaism's prophets wrote before Zoroaster was born. Therefore it is common sense to conclude it is more likely that Judaism influenced Zoroastrianism, Islam, and Christianity than vice versa." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.52.84.153 (talk) 16:18, 31 December 2017 (UTC)

The article is not written as well as for example Zoroaster. It includes many references which are not cited, and which, who actually read them, prove or consider that Zoroastrianism did influence Judaism, and through it Christianity and Islam. The considerations about the influence of Judaism on Zoroastrianism is Abrahamic religions bias and historical revisionism (and geographically does not make sense). The Judaic prophets did not "write", in the mainstream is considered they were written by multiple authors and many centuries later, hence cannot be said to be "common sense".--Miki Filigranski (talk) 01:16, 1 January 2018 (UTC)

The strong assertion of influence by Zoroastrianism on other religions, mentioned in the first paragraph of this article, is not backed up in the body of the article, nor in the references. The influence of Zoroastrianism on Judaism, in particular, seems to be a subject of wide debate. See, for instance, Barr, James. “The Question of Religious Influence: The Case of Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and Christianity.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion, vol. 53, no. 2, 1985, pp. 201–235. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/1464919. I suggest tempering the statement in this article to something along the lines of "Major features... have been conjectured to have influenced other religious systems...." --68.65.174.192 (talk) 06:22, 27 June 2018 (UTC)

Zoroastrianism did NOT influence Christianity[edit]

This idea has been disproven. The more I read Wikipedia, the more I see its atheistic, liberal bias. So much for objectivity. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Jikipoiopo (talkcontribs) 15:04, 14 August 2018 (UTC)

Wikipedia sticks to professionally-published mainstream academic or journalistic sources. It does not adjust in the face of hissy-fit allegations and bias-motivated tantrums. Ian.thomson (talk) 15:12, 14 August 2018 (UTC)
"The more I read Wikipedia, the more I see its atheistic, liberal bias" : Then just stop reading it and go write a blog where you could expose your POV, this is an encyclopedia, seems that this is not a place for editors like you. Regards.---Wikaviani(talk) (contribs) 23:00, 14 August 2018 (UTC)