Template talk:Rutgers Scarlet Knights football navbox

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Well I am not going to edit war? But you have your source. I have my sources[edit]

This from the Rutgers football page On November 6, 1869, Rutgers and nearby neighbor Princeton competed in the first ever intercollegiate football game. The site for the contest was a small plot of land where the College Avenue Gymnasium currently stands on Rutgers' campus in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The structure of the game resembled more of a rugby-style contest instead of modern day football, with players allowed to kick and bat the ball with their fists and hands. At the time, Rutgers was referred to as the Queensmen, a homage to the school's chartered name of Queen's College. The Rutgers squad was captained by William J. Leggett and donned scarlet kerchiefs atop their heads in an effort to distinguish between the two teams. Rutgers would go on to win the contest by a score of 6 goals to 4.[1]

A week after the first game was held in New Brunswick, Rutgers would visit Princeton for a second matchup. This time, Princeton prevailed by a score of 8 goals to 0. Rutgers and Princeton had planned for a third game in the 1869 season, but the contest never took place due to fears that the games were interfering with the students' studies. Thus, both schools would end the season with a record of 1-1, theoretically tying for the first ever national championship in college football history.[1]UCO2009bluejay (talk) 04:20, 10 January 2015 (UTC)

NCAA Record Book CLEARLY claims Rutgers 1869 national champions[edit]

Page 76, http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/football_records/2014/FBS.pdf

This should settle it for good.UCO2009bluejay (talk) 04:31, 10 January 2015 (UTC)

  1. ^ a b Pellowski, Michael (2008). Rutgers Football: A Gridiron Tradition in Scarlet.