Thai Australians

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Thai Australians
ไทยออสเตรเลีย
Total population
45,635
Languages
Australian English, Thai
Religion
Theravada Buddhism
Related ethnic groups
Thai people, Siamese, Isan people, Thai Chinese, Thai Diaspora, Thai ethnic groups, Tai peoples, Lao people, Asian Australians,

Thai Australians refers to Australians of Thai ancestry. The Australian census recorded 45,635 Australians with Thai ancestry in the 2011 census.[1]

Notable Thai Australians[edit]

History of Immigration from Thailand[3][edit]

In 1911, the master of the Thai royal stables visited Australia and bought 126 horses. This started a trend of royal envoys from Thailand visiting Australia on horse-buying and other economic missions.[4]

Melbourne's Museum Victoria (2013) reveals that the first notable Thai to arrive in Australia was Butra Mahintra, sent by King Rama VI during the early 1920s to purchase racehorses. Connections with Thai royalty developed further with the arrival of Prince Purachatra in 1927, leading a group to observe Australian agriculture and infrastructure [5]

The number of Thais officially counted in New South Wales stayed under 50 until the 1950s. In January 1950, the Australian government launched the Colombo Plan, an aid program for sponsoring Asian students to study or train in Australian tertiary institutions. The main objectives of the plan were to dispel the negative impression of Asian countries toward the White Australia Policy[4] and to counter communism in Asia. Students from developing countries were brought to Australia to study. The idea was that when they had finished their studies students would return to use the skills and knowledge they had acquired to help their own people. Approximately 450 Thai students travelled to Australia on the Colombo Plan between 1954 and 1989.[6] Most did not settle in Australia permanently, but they increased awareness of Australia when they returned to Thailand. Between the 1950s and 1970s the majority of new arrivals from Thailand in Australia continued to be students, as well as spouses of Australians and those sponsored under military traineeships.

The number of migrants in Australia grew significantly when the Immigration Restriction Act was repealed in 1973. In 1975, Australia accepted many Vietnamese, Lao and Cambodian refugees for settlement. Included in this group of Indochinese refugees were non-Thais born inside Thailand. By 1986, the Thailand-born population in Australia had risen to 6,998 people, but only half of these were of Thai ancestry.[7] This means that the Thai-born population of Thai ancestry in Australia at that time was less than one-twelfth of today’s figure.

The latest Census in 2011 recorded 45,465 Thailand-born people in Australia, an increase of 48.8 per cent from the 2006 Census. The 2011 distribution by state and territory showed New South Wales had the largest number with 17,541, followed by Victoria (10,766), Queensland (7,022) and Western Australia (5,662). Among the total Thailand-born in Australia at the 2011 Census, 23.1 per cent arrived between 2001 and 2006 and 32.8 per cent arrived between 2006 and 2011.

Thailand-Born Resident Population in Australia[edit]

People born in Thailand as a percentage of the population in Sydney divided geographically by postal area, as of the 2011 census

Estimated Thailand-Born Resident Population, by State, 1996-2011 [8][edit]

Region 1996 % 2001 % 2006 % 2011 %
Australia 19,890 100% 24,430 100% 34,060 100% 52,990 100%
New South Wales 7,890 40% 10,170 42% 13,710 40% 20,530 39%
Victoria 4,600 23% 5,580 23% 7,810 23% 12,450 23%
Queensland 2,360 12% 3,080 13% 4,980 15% 8,140 15%
South Australia 1,150 6% 1,350 6% 1,880 6% 2,510 5%
Western Australia 2,540 13% 2,710 11% 3,850 11% 6,710 13%
Tasmania 290 1% 280 1% 350 1% 560 1%
Northern Territory 410 2% 520 2% 600 2% 900 2%
ACT 650 3% 750 3% 890 3% 1,190 2%

Estimated Thailand-Born Resident Population, 1992 to 2014[9][edit]

Year Population Change % Change
1992 15,240 -
1993 15,800 560 4%
1994 16,850 1,050 7%
1995 18,340 1,490 9%
1996 19,890 1,550 8%
1997 20,550 660 3%
1998 21,250 700 3%
1999 22,120 870 4%
2000 23,040 920 4%
2001 24,440 1,400 6%
2002 26,390 1,950 8%
2003 28,250 1,860 7%
2004 29,700 1,450 5%
2005 31,540 1,840 6%
2006 34,060 2,520 8%
2007 38,310 4,250 12%
2008 43,200 4,890 13%
2009 48,480 5,280 12%
2010 51,570 3,090 6%
2011 52,990 1,420 3%
2012 55,200 2,210 4%
2013 58,330 3,130 6%
2014 61,910 3,580 6%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statistics from the 2011 Census" (PDF). The People of NSW. Department of Immigration and Citizenship, Commonwealth of Australia. 2014. Table 13, Ancestry. Retrieved 23 July 2016. 
  2. ^ Lewis, Dave. "Meet the midfielder aiming to be a Socceroos World Cup bolter". The World Game. Special Broadcasting Service. Retrieved 17 February 2018. 
  3. ^ Beasley, Tamerlaine; Hirsch, Philip; Rungmanee, Soimart. "Thailand in Australia" (PDF). sydney.edu.au. University of Sydney. Retrieved 9 February 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Pollock, Z. (2007). Pai Nai Ma (Where Have You been?) Retrieved 6 January 2014, from New South Wales Migration Heritage Centre
  5. ^ Museum Victoria (2013). History of immigration from Thailand. Retrieved 6 January 2014
  6. ^ Australian Embassy in Thailand, Kobua. "Impressions of Australia Reflected by Colombo scholars from Thailand on the Occasion of the 60th Anniversary of Colombo Plan (Kwam Pra Tub Jai Tee Nuk Rian Tun Colombo Chao Thai Mee Thor Pratej Australia Nueng Nai Okat Krob Rob 60 Pee Paen Colombo)" (PDF). thailand.embassy.gov.au. Australian Embassy Bangkok. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  7. ^ Department of Immigration and Citizenship. "Community Information Summary: Thailand-born Retrieved" (PDF). immi.gov.au. Department of Immigration and Citizenship. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 
  8. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics. "Estimated Resident Population, by Country of Birth by State, 1996-2011" (ABS.stat). abs.gov.au/. Retrieved 9 February 2015. 
  9. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics. "Estimated Resident Population by Country of Birth - 1992 to 2014" (ABS.stat). abs.gov.au/. Retrieved 9 February 2015. 

External links[edit]