Tony Jackson (basketball, born 1942)

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Tony Jackson
Personal information
Born(1942-11-07)November 7, 1942
Brooklyn, New York
DiedOctober 28, 2005(2005-10-28) (aged 62)
Brooklyn, New York
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Listed weight185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High schoolThomas Jefferson
(Brooklyn, New York)
CollegeSt. John's (1958–1961)
NBA draft1961 / Round: 3 / Pick: 24th overall
Selected by the New York Knicks
Playing career1961–1969
PositionSmall forward / Shooting guard
Number24, 25
Career history
1961–1963Chicago Majors
1967–1968New Jersey Americans / New York Nets
1968Minnesota Pipers
1968–1969Houston Mavericks
Career highlights and awards

Tony B. Jackson (November 7, 1942 – October 28, 2005) was an American professional basketball player.

Jackson was born in the borough of Brooklyn in New York City.[1] A standout player under coach Joe Lapchick at St. John's University from 1958 to 1961, Jackson was six feet, four inches tall and played two seasons in the American Basketball League and two seasons in the American Basketball Association.[1][2] Jackson scored 53 points (including 12 three-point baskets) while playing for the Chicago Majors of the ABL on March 14, 1962, he died of cancer in 2005 in Brooklyn.[2]

Tony Jackson's retired number

Jackson, Connie Hawkins, Doug Moe, and Roger Brown were indicted in the 1962 NCAA basketball point shaving scandals involving Jack Molinas and banned from the NBA for life by then-NBA commissioner Walter Kennedy.[3][4] Jackson participated in the 1968 ABA All-Star Game and holds the ABA record for free throws in a single game with 24.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b https://www.basketball-reference.com/players/j/jacksto01.html
  2. ^ a b Goldstein, Richard (November 2, 2005). "Tony Jackson, 65, Who Led St. John's Basketball, Dies". The New York Times. Retrieved May 25, 2010.
  3. ^ Callahan, Tom (June 26, 1989). "Essay: Did Pete Rose Do It? What Are the Odds?". Time. Retrieved May 25, 2010.
  4. ^ http://espn.go.com/classic/s/basketball_scandals_molinas.html
  5. ^ The Official NBA Basketball Encyclopedia. Villard Books. 1994. p. 208. ISBN 0-679-43293-0.