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Transport in Angola

Transport in Angola comprises: There are three separate railway lines in Angola: Luanda Railway Benguela Railway Moçâmedes Railway Reconstruction of these three lines began in 2005 and is expected to be completed by the end of the year 2012. The Benguela Railway connects to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 1,300 km navigable country comparison to the world: 36 gas, 2 km. Angola plans to build an oil refinery in Lobito in the coming years; the government plans to build a deep-water port at Barra do Dande, north of Luanda, in Bengo province near Caxito. Total: 6country comparison to the world: 128by type: cargo 1, passenger/cargo 2, petroleum tanker 2, roll on/roll off 1 foreign owned: 1 registered in other countries: 6 211 total: 30 over 3,047 m: 5 2,438 to 3,047 m: 8 1,524 to 2,437 m: 12 914 to 1,523 m: 4 under 914 m: 1 total: 181 over 3,047 m: 2 2,438 to 3,047 m: 5 1,524 to 2,437 m: 32 914 to 1,523 m: 100 under 914 m: 42 TAAG Angola Airlines Sonair Angola had an estimated total of 43 airports as of 2004, of which 31 had paved runways as of 2005.

There is an international airport at Luanda. International and domestic services are maintained by TAAG Angola Airlines, British Airways, Brussels Airlines, Air France, Air Namibia, Ethiopian Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Royal Air Maroc, Hainan Airlines, Kenya Airways, South African Airways, TAP Air Portugal and several regional carriers. In 2003, domestic and international carriers carried 198,000 passengers. There are airstrips for domestic transport at Benguela, Huambo, Moçâmedes, Catumbela; this article comes from the CIA World Factbook 2003. This article incorporates public domain material from the CIA World Factbook website https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html

John Paul Jones Memorial Park

John Paul Jones Memorial Park is a municipal park in the town of Kittery, Maine. The trapezoidal park, flanked by the lanes of United States Route 1 approaching the Memorial Bridge across the Piscataqua River, was established in 1926 and named for American Revolutionary War naval hero John Paul Jones, its centerpiece is a memorial commemorating the soldiers and sailors of the state of Maine, designed by Bashka Paeff. The park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998. John Paul Jones Memorial Park is located between Hunter and Newmarch Streets in southern Kittery, just north of the Piscataqua River; the two roadways carry one-way traffic in opposite directions, to and from the Memorial Bridge to Badger's Island and Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The park is 2 acres, in size, trapezoidal in shape, it is a flat grassy area, with trees fringing the border and a few specimen trees dotting the park. The southern end of the park is dominated by the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial sculpture of Bashka Paeff, a gold bronze relief sculpture set in a granite frame mounted on a stone plaza.

The park is home to three other memorial, all placed in the park after its establishment. The Sloop Ranger monument placed on Badger's Island in 1905, was moved to the park in 1963; the Province of Maine Monument is a bronze tablet mounted in a circular granite pedestal, placed in 1931. The third memorial is to the United States Marine Corps, was placed in 1984; the park's construction is intimately bound to the construction of the original Memorial Bridge, a war memorial to the military of both Maine and New Hampshire who served in World War I. The bridge was completed in 1923, Governor Percival Baxter held a design competition for a suitable memorial. Paeff's initial design was acceptable to Baxter, but not his successor, Ralph Owen Brewster, the memorial was not placed until 1926, after Paeff made alterations to its design; the park was named for John Paul Jones by an act of the state legislature in 1927, somewhat obscuring the intent that it be a memorial to World War I soldiers. National Register of Historic Places in York County, Maine

Ó hÁdhmaill

Ó hÁdhmaill is a Gaelic Irish clan from Ulster. The name is now rendered in many forms, most Hamill; the clan are a branch of Cenél nEógain, belonging to the Uí Néill. Their descendants in Ireland are found predominantly across Ulster, County Louth, Leinster. In Irish if the second part of the surname begins with a vowel'Á', the form Ó attaches a h to it, this is the h-prothesis mutation. In this case Ádhmaill becomes Ó hÁdhmaill; the other forms effect no change: Ní Adhmaill, Uí Adhmaill. Capitalized as: Ó hÁDHMAILL or Ó ʜÁDHMAILL, the first'h' should always be either lowercase, or a smaller'H' font size; the Motto is Esse Quam Videri, translated. The Slogan is "Vestigia nulla retrorsum", translated as No backward steps; the Coat of Arms is described as being. On top of the shield is a ducal coronet. Atop the coronet is the figure of a leopard in profile, sitting with its face to the viewer's left; the Azure/Blue represents Strength and Truth The Ermine is associated with the robes and crowns of Royal and Noble Personages Ducal Coronet is a crown of a duke Leopard in profile is traditionally depicted the same as a lion One of the leading clans of the Cenél mBinnigh, Cenél nEógain a branch of the Northern Uí Néill.

They are descendants of Eochach Binnich mac Eógain, son of Eógan mac Néill, son of the fifth-century Néill Noígiallaig, founder of the Uí Néill dynasty. Cenél mBinnigh; the O'Hamills continued to move from North Ulster with the Northern Ui Neill's, ruled territory in County Tyrone and County Armagh, South Ulster. Hereditary Chief or Clan chief. Cinéal. Finte. Branches; the dot above the lenited letter was replaced by the letters dh from the standard Roman alphabet changing it to Ó hÁdhmaıll. The Irish language makes no graphemic distinction between dotted i and dotless ı so at the same time it changed to Ó hÁdhmaill; as the dh is silent, the pronunciation is similar to spelling it as O'Hamill, how it came to be spelt when it was phonetically anglicised, over time the spelling lost the O' and changed to Hamill, giving us the modern Irish-English spelling of Hamill. Tara Uí Adhmaill, specialising in the teaching of Irish to adults with expertise in raising children with Irish and Co-Founder of Glór Mológa, an Irish language community group based in Dublin South Central.

Giolla Criost Ó hAdhmaill, taoiseach of Clann Adhmaill who fought with the last King of Ulaid, Ruaidhrí Mac Duinnshléibhe against John de Courcy in 1177. Ruarcan O'Hamill, chief Poet to O'Hanlon Judge William G. J. Hamill, Judge of the District Court Seán Ó hAdhmaill, Conradh na Glór na nGael. Dr. Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Programme Director & Lecturer at University College Cork, in Applied Social Studies. Cormac Ó hÁdhmaill, BBC TV Presenter Éamonn Ó hAdhmaill, TV Presenter and editor Tomás O’hAmaill, Tomás Hamill, Tipperary senior inter-county hurling team Peadar Ó hÁḋmaıll, Peter Hamill, Na Fianna Éireann 1st Brigade, 4th Northern Division, No. 5. Sec. Dún Dealgan Thomas Hamill, Irish Volunteers, 4 Battalion, Cycling Corps and Irish Republican Army, 1 Brigade, 4 Northern Division, Dundalk Thomas Hamill, Dunleer Thomas Hamill, Irish Volunteers and Irish Republican Army, Dublin. Served in 1 Battalion, G Company, Dublin Brigade. Thomas Hamill, Na Fianna Éireann, 1st Battalion Belfast Brigade William Hamill, Na Fianna Éireann, 3rd Brigade, 4th Northern Division, Armagh City Sluagh attached to Armagh City Batt.

Barney Hamill, Na Fianna Éireann, 3rd Brigade, 4th Northern Division, Derrytrasna Sluagh attached to Lurgan Batt. George Hamill, Irish Republican Army, Lurgan Battalion, B Company Lurgan James Hamill, Irish Republican Army, Lurgan Battalion, C Company Derrymacash Thomas Hamill, Irish Republican Army, A Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division James Hamill, Irish Republican Army, A Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division John Hamill, Irish Republican Army, B Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division James Hamill, Irish Republican Army, C Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division John Hamill, Irish Republican Army, C Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division Patrick Hamill, Irish Republican Army, D Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division Arthur & Patrick Hamill, Irish Republican Army, D Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division Michael Hamill, Irish Republican Army, F Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division Francis Hamill, Irish Republican Army, G Company, Dungannon Battalion, No. 1 Brigade, 2nd Northern Division Sáir Seán Ó hÁmaill, Sgt.

John Hamill, Memorial: Irish Army United Nations Service, located Section 40, South Section of Glasnevin Cemetery. Hamill Surname List

2013 CAF Confederation Cup qualifying rounds

The qualifying rounds of the 2013 CAF Confederation Cup were played from 16 February to 2 June 2013, to decide the eight teams which advanced to the group stage. The draw for the preliminary and second qualifying rounds was held on 9 December 2012, at the CAF Headquarters in Cairo and the fixtures were announced by the CAF on 10 December 2012; the following 51 teams were entered into the draw: Qualification ties were played on a home-and-away two-legged basis. If the sides were level on aggregate after the second leg, the away goals rule was applied, if still level, the tie proceeded directly to a penalty shoot-out; the schedule of each round was. The preliminary round included the 38 teams. Gor Mahia advanced to the first round. SuperSport United advanced to the first round. Liga Muçulmana advanced to the first round. AS Douanes Lomé advanced to the first round. Rail Club du Kadiogo advanced to the first round. LLB Académic advanced to the first round. Panthère du Ndé advanced to the first round.

US Bitam advanced to the first round. Dedebit advanced to the first round. 3–3 on aggregate. TCO Boeny advanced to the first round. Gamtel advanced to the first round. 1–1 on aggregate. Diables Noirs advanced to the first round; the Panthers advanced to the first round. Recreativo da Caála advanced to the first round. US Bougouni advanced to the first round. Onze Créateurs advanced to the first round. Barrack Young Controllers II advanced to the first round. Azam advanced to the first round. Note: Al-Nasr played their home match in Tunisia due to security concerns in Libya. Al-Nasr advanced to the first round; the first round included 32 teams: the 19 winners of the preliminary round, the 13 teams that received byes to this round. ENPPI advanced to the second round. SuperSport United advanced to the second round. Liga Muçulmana advanced to the second round. Wydad Casablanca advanced to the second round. Note: Order of legs reversed after original draw, since two other teams from Côte d'Ivoire were playing CAF Champions League first legs at home on the same weekend.

ASEC Mimosas advanced to the second round. Note: Second leg postponed after three players of DC Motema Pembe were killed in a car accident. LLB Académic advanced to the second round. USM Alger advanced to the second round. US Bitam advanced to the second round after Heartland arrived late for the second leg, as per ruling made by the CAF. Al-Ahly Shendi advanced to the second round. Ismaily advanced to the second round. CS Sfaxien advanced to the second round. Diables Noirs won 6–1 on aggregate and advances to the second round. Recreativo da Caála advanced to the second round. Étoile du Sahel advanced to the second round. Azam advanced to the second round. FAR Rabat advanced to the second round; the second round included the 16 winners of the first round. ENPPI advanced to the play-off round. 3–3 on aggregate. Liga Muçulmana advanced to the play-off round. 1–1 on aggregate. LLB Académic advanced to the play-off round. US Bitam advanced to the play-off round. 0–0 on aggregate. Ismaily advanced to the play-off round.

CS Sfaxien advanced to the play-off round. Étoile du Sahel advanced to the play-off round. FAR Rabat advanced to the play-off round; the play-off round included 16 teams: the eight winners of the Confederation Cup second round and the eight losers of the Champions League second round. The winners of each tie advanced to the group stage; the draw for the play-off round was held on 7 May 2013, 12:00 UTC+2, at the CAF Headquarters in Cairo, Egypt. The winners of the Confederation Cup second round were drawn against the losers of the Champions League second round, with the former hosting the second leg. Four ties contained a seeded loser of the Champions League second round and an unseeded winner of the Confederation Cup second round, the other four ties contained a seeded winner of the Confederation Cup second round and an unseeded loser of the Champions League second round; the following 16 teams were entered into the draw: Stade Malien won 6–0 on aggregate and advanced to the group stage. CS Sfaxien advanced to the group stage after Enugu Rangers, which had won 1–0 on aggregate, was ruled by the CAF to have fielded an ineligible player in the second leg and thus disqualified.

FUS Rabat advanced to the group stage. CA Bizertin advanced to the group stage. 2–2 on aggregate. ES Sétif advanced to the group stage. Étoile du Sahel advanced to the group stage. TP Mazembe advanced to the group stage. 3–3 on aggregate. Saint George advanced to the group stage. Orange CAF Confederation Cup

Theodosius of Manyava

Saint Theodosius of Manyava is a Ukrainian Orthodox saint, venerable and one of the founders and the second hegumen of Manyava Skete, men's cell solitary monastery in the Carpathian Mountains of western Ukraine. Since his younger years, he was drawn to the spirituality, he served as a hierodeacon when, in 1608, he and a few others joined Saint Job of Manyava to follow him in strict ascetic practices, to become monks in seclusion and wilderness of the Carpathian mountains. He was chosen, by Saint Job for his zeal and humility. With God's blessing and help of the Christian community, the monks built a mountain monastery and, on the Feast of Exaltation of the Holy Cross, the monastery church was consecrated in 1612. In all the works, Theodosius served as assistant to St. Job and when the latter was leaving for a pilgrimage to the Kyiv Caves Monastery, he entrusted the former to be the head of the community by saying, "Be our shepherd and spiritual father, you ought to be hegumen, I will be assisting you as long as I live".

In the end of 1621, 70 year old Job fell sick and died on 29 December 1621. Theodosius headed the monastery for 8 years after Job's death. In 1628, he took part in the First Synod of Kyivan metropoly after the Brest Union; the synod was summoned by the Orthodox metropolitan of Kyiv and Halych Job Boretsky in the Golden Domed Saint Michael's monastery in Kyiv. Venerable Theodosius lived giving a great example of virtue. Rumours about his strict and virtuous living spread through the Carpathians, Galicia and Bukovyna, Romania. Theodosius' spiritual authority and the strict monastic rules of his community brought about much respect on the part of other Orthodox monasteries in the entire region. At the church synod of 1628, hegumen Thodosius and his Manayva monastic community were chosen to be the heading monastery in charge over 556 other monasteries in western Ukraine and Moldova. Theodosius' contemporary saint, Peter Mohyla, the metropolitan of Kyiv, wrote: "If you wish to see God´s servants in human likeness, go to the Carpathians, where 200 angels in human flesh dedicated their lives to God by their service".

Having contributed much to the welfare of Manyava Skete and many other monasteries, venerable Theodosius died in 1629 and was buried next to his teacher, Job. The large stone tombstone with an Orthodox cross engraved upon it, that had covered their graves, is kept and venerated in Manyava Skete. Theodosius was canonized both by Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Moscow Patriarchate and by the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Kyiv Patriarchate, his memory is celebrated on 24 September. Common memory, together with St. Job, is celebrated on 24 June. Venerable Job and Theodosius of Manyava / "Nasha parafiya" History of Manyava Skete Official site of Manyava Skete

Saagar (album)

Saagar is the debut album released by Pakistani pop band, Fuzön. The album includes twelve tracks. All music written and composed by Fuzön, those which are not are mentioned below. All information is taken from the CD. FuzönShafqat Amanat Ali - vocals, backing vocals Imran Momina - keyboards, backing vocals Shallum Asher Xavier - lead guitar, backing vocalsAdditional musiciansBacking vocals on "Tere Bina" by Waseem Niaz Violin on "Kahaniyan" by Saeed and MansoorProductionProduced by Imran Momina and Shallum Asher Xavier Recorded & mixed at Planet Audio in Karachi, Pakistan Photography and design by Amaan Ahmed Visual effects by Shahzad Riaz Text by Ali Tim Official Website