click links in text for more info
SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Transuranium element

The transuranium elements are the chemical elements with atomic numbers greater than 92, the atomic number of uranium. All of these elements decay radioactively into other elements. Of the elements with atomic numbers 1 to 92, most can be found in nature, having stable, or long half-life isotopes, or are created as common products of the decay of uranium and thorium; the exceptions are elements 43, 61, 85, 87. All of the elements with higher atomic numbers have been first discovered in the laboratory, with neptunium and plutonium also discovered in nature, they are all radioactive, with a half-life much shorter than the age of the Earth, so any primordial atoms of these elements, if they were present at the Earth's formation, have long since decayed. Trace amounts of neptunium and plutonium form in some uranium-rich rock, small amounts are produced during atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons; these two elements are generated from neutron capture in uranium ore with subsequent beta decays. Transuranic elements can be artificially generated synthetic elements, via nuclear reactors or particle accelerators.

The half lives of these elements show a general trend of decreasing as atomic numbers increase. There are exceptions, including several isotopes of curium and dubnium. Further anomalous elements in this series have been predicted by Glenn T. Seaborg, are categorised as the "island of stability". Heavy transuranic elements are difficult and expensive to produce, their prices increase with atomic number; as of 2008, the cost of weapons-grade plutonium was around $4,000/gram, californium exceeded $60,000,000/gram. Einsteinium is the heaviest transuranic element, produced in macroscopic quantities. Transuranic elements that have not been discovered, or have been discovered but are not yet named, use IUPAC's systematic element names; the naming of transuranic elements may be a source of controversy. So far all the transuranium elements have been discovered at four laboratories: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the United States, the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Russia, the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Germany, RIKEN in Japan.

The Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, led principally by Edwin McMillan, Glenn Seaborg, Albert Ghiorso, during 1945-1974: 93. Neptunium, Np, named after the planet Neptune, as it follows uranium and Neptune follows Uranus in the planetary sequence. 94. Plutonium, Pu, named after the dwarf planet Pluto, following the same naming rule as it follows neptunium and Pluto follows Neptune in the pre-2006 planetary sequence. 95. Americium, Am, named because it is an analog to europium, so was named after the continent where it was first produced. 96. Curium, Cm, named after Pierre and Marie Curie, famous scientists who separated out the first radioactive elements, as its lighter analog gadolinium was named after Johan Gadolin. 97. Berkelium, Bk, named after the city of Berkeley, where the University of California, Berkeley is located. 98. Californium, Cf, named after the state of California. 99. Einsteinium, Es, named after the theoretical physicist Albert Einstein. 100. Fermium, Fm, named after Enrico Fermi, the physicist who produced the first controlled chain reaction.

101. Mendelevium, Md, named after the Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev, credited for being the primary creator of the periodic table of the chemical elements. 102. Nobelium, No, named after Alfred Nobel; this discovery was claimed by the JINR, which named it joliotium after Frédéric Joliot-Curie. IUPAC concluded that the JINR had been the first to convincingly synthesise the element, but retained the name nobelium as entrenched in the literature. 103. Lawrencium, Lr, named after Ernest O. Lawrence, a physicist best known for development of the cyclotron, the person for whom the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are named; this discovery was claimed by the JINR, which proposed the name rutherfordium after Ernest Rutherford. IUPAC concluded that credit should be shared, retaining the name lawrencium as entrenched in the literature. 104. Rutherfordium, Rf, named after Ernest Rutherford, responsible for the concept of the atomic nucleus; this discovery was claimed by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, led principally by Georgy Flyorov: they named the element kurchatovium, after Igor Kurchatov.

IUPAC concluded. 105. Dubnium, Db, an element, named after the city of Dubna, where the JINR is located. Named "hahnium" in honor of Otto Hahn by the Berkeley group but renamed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry; this discovery was claimed by the JINR, which named it nielsbohrium after Niels Bohr. IUPAC concluded. 106. Seaborgium, Sg, named after Glenn T. Seaborg; this name c

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1906

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1906, adopted unanimously on December 23, 2009, after reaffirming previous resolutions on the topic and noting the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Council decided to extend the mandate of the United Nations Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo until 31 May 2010. The resolution therefore allowed 21,000 police and domestic and international troops to remain the country; the resolution assigned the mission with three main tasks, to: ensure the effective protection of civilians, humanitarian and UN personnel and facilities. The Council reiterated its concern about continued violations of human rights in the conflict zones, urging the Congolese government "to protect the civilian population, to develop sustainable security sector institutions which respect the rule of law and to ensure respect for human rights and the fight against impunity." It called upon the Lord's Resistance Army and Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda in particular to cease all forms of violence.

The Council requested the Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to conduct a strategic review of the situation in the DR Congo and MONUC's progress towards achieving its mandate, taking into account the Integrated Strategic Framework for the United Nations presence in the country by 1 April 2010. With this in mind, the Council proposed to extend MONUC in the future, once it had found ways for it to better protect civilians. Dongo conflict Ituri conflict Kivu conflict List of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1901 to 2000 Text of the Resolution at undocs.org

Collegiate Marching Band Festival

The Collegiate Marching Band Festival called the CMBF, is an annual event held in Allentown, United States, which showcases college and university marching bands of all sizes and styles from across the Northeastern United States. First held in 1996, the event takes places in early October at J. Birney Crum Stadium, a renowned venue for marching band and drum corps performances; the festival is not a competition, but rather an opportunity for fans and band members alike to view bands that perform a variety of shows and exhibit different performance styles. The festival is managed by Vivace Productions, Inc. out of West Chester, PA While many of the participating bands perform contemporary “corps style” shows using roll-step marching, other performance varieties abound. Morgan State University, from Baltimore, performs a high-energy show typical of southern HBCU bands. Lehigh University and Penn State University, both of which have participated in the past, perform traditional "Big Ten" style shows with a high-step marching technique.

Other bands, including Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Kutztown University, West Chester University, The University of Delaware, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, have developed unique styles all their own. Celebrating its 21st occurrence in 2016, the festival has a number of traditions, which spectators and performers have come to anticipate on an annual basis. Order of performance The order of performance is rotated on an annual basis although it still follows a pattern where smaller-sized bands perform early in the day and larger bands perform later; as a custom, the first band to perform plays the National Anthem to signify the start of the festival. Vendors The festival features an area for vendors to set up information booths. Vendors have included companies involved in the marching arts and bugle corps from both Drum Corps International and Drum Corps Associates, recruiting tables for participating schools. Concessions J. Birney Crum Stadium boasts some eccentric food choices.

Among them can be found fried pierogies and giant Hawaiian Shave Ices that resemble softball-sized snow cones. Many festival-goers make. Musical Organizations The Collegiate Marching Band Festival is traditionally staffed by the Eta Rho chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi and the Zeta Upsilon chapter of Tau Beta Sigma. Members of these organizations from several chapters use the festival as a time to gather together and socialize while engaging in their own particular traditions. Additional musical fraternities such as Phi Mu Alpha congregate at this time. Alumni and members of area socialize at the event. Students and alumni from the participating bands take this opportunity to commingle with other members and before all the schools depart. Many of the organizations sing their respective hymn/song before departing the festival. Tubas/Sousaphones After the last band performs, the tuba and sousaphone players from several of the larger bands congregate at the center of the field to play traditional tunes, socialize with each other, put on a humorous display for the exiting crowds.

This congregation is called "The Clusterfun". Sunday, September 21, 2003 - Order of Appearance Kutztown University Marching Unit Lehigh University – Marching 97 Lebanon Valley College – The Pride of the Valley Gettysburg College – Bullet Marching Band Boston University – Terrier Marching Band California University of Pennsylvania Marching Band Millersville University – Marauder Marching Band Shippensburg University – Red Raider Marching Band Shepherd University – Ram Band Morgan State University – The Magnificent Marching Machine Indiana University of Pennsylvania – The Legend Liberty University – The Spirit of the Mountain University of Massachusetts Amherst – Minuteman Marching Band The Power and Class of New England Mansfield University – The Pride of Pennsylvania University of Delaware – Fightin’ Blue Hen Marching Band West Chester University – Incomparable Golden Rams Marching Band Sunday, October 10, 2004 - Order of Appearance Clarion University – Golden Eagle Marching Band Lebanon Valley College – The Pride of the Valley Kutztown University Marching Unit Boston University – Terrier Marching Band Gettysburg College – Bullet Marching Band California University of Pennsylvania Marching Band Millersville University – Marauder Marching Band Towson University – Tiger Marching Band Temple University – Diamond Marching Band Shepherd University – Ram Band Mansfield University – The Pride of Pennsylvania Slippery Rock University – The Marching Pride Morgan State University – The Magnificent Marching Machine Shippensburg University – Red Raider Marching Band West Chester University – Incomparable Golden Rams Marching Band University of Delaware – Fightin’ Blue Hen Marching Band Indiana University of Pennsylvania – The Legend University of Massachusetts Amherst – Minuteman Marching Band The Power and Class of New England Sunday, October 2, 2005 - Order of Appearance East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania – Warrior Marching Band Clarion University – Golden Eagle Marching Band Kutztown University Marching Unit Lebanon Valley College – The Pride of the Valley Shepherd University – Ram Band Slippery Rock University – The Marching Pride Liberty University – The Spirit of the Mountain Boston University – Terrier Marching Band California University of Pennsylvania Marching Band Towson University – Tiger Marching Band Morgan State University – The Magnificent Marching Machine Millersville University – Marauder Marching Band Shippensburg University – Red Raider Marching Band Mansfield University – The Pride of Pennsylvania University of Massachusetts Amh

Roy Lee (baseball)

Roy Edwin Lee was an American baseball player and collegiate coach. He was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the New York Giants in 1945. Roy Lee was named the head coach of the Saint Louis University baseball program in 1960. In seven years, his Billikens built a record of 125–84–5, his teams won the Missouri Valley Conference regular season title in 1966 and the MVC Tournament championship in 1964–66, earning a place in the National Collegiate Athletic Association playoffs. Lee's Billikens placed third in the 1965 College World Series. In 1967, Lee departed the successful Division I program at St. Louis to start the new Division II program at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. With no scholarships and no budget, he built a successful program. In his eleven years as the Cougars' head coach, his teams had a record of 237–144–3 and made eight successive appearances in the NCAA playoffs. Lee's Cougars advanced to the Division II College World Series three times and finished as the 1976 runners-up.

On April 26, 1986, between the games of a double-header, the SIUE baseball field was rededicated and named Roy E. Lee Field. Career statistics and player information from MLB, or Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference, or Retrosheet

Newland, East Riding of Yorkshire

Newland is a hamlet in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated 3 miles east of Howden and lies north of the B1230 road and it straddles the M62 motorway, it is served by Eastrington railway station on the Hull to York Line. It forms part of the civil parish of Eastrington. Newland lies within the Parliamentary constituency of Haltemprice and Howden an area that consists of middle class suburbs and villages; the area has one of the highest proportions of owner-occupiers in the country. In 1823 Newland, was in the parishes of Eastrington and Howden, the Wapentake and Liberty of Howdenshire

Dietrich

Dietrich is an ancient German name meaning "Ruler of the People". "keeper of the keys" or a "lockpick" either the tool or the profession. Dietrich of Ringelheim, Saxon count and father of St. Mathilda Dietrich Bonhoeffer, German Lutheran pastor and theologian Wilhelm Dietrich von Buddenbrock, Prussian field marshal and cavalry leader Dieterich Buxtehude, Danish-German composer and organist Dietrich Eckart, German politician Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, German baritone singer Dietrich von Hildebrand, German Catholic philosopher and theologian Dietrich Hollinderbäumer, German-Swedish actor Dietrich of Alsace, Count of Flanders Dietrich Stobbe, German politician Dietrich Thurau, German cyclist Albert Dietrich, German composer and conductor Albert Gottfried Dietrich, German botanist Amalie Dietrich, German naturalist and museum collector August Dietrich, American politician Brandon Dietrich, Canadian professional ice hockey player Craig Dietrich, creator of culturally-sensitive software Derek Dietrich, American baseball player Fritz Dietrich, German musicologist and composer Fritz Dietrich, German Nazi SS officer executed for war crimes Guillermo Dietrich, Argentine politician Jacob Dietrich, American politician John H. Dietrich, Unitarian humanist minister Klaus Dietrich, Austrian footballer Marlene Dietrich and American actress and entertainer Philippe Friedrich Dietrich, French scientist and politician.

Derek Derrick Detrick Diderik Diederich Diedrich Dietrich v The Queen, case in the High Court of Australia Dieter Dieterich Dietrick Lorraine-Dietrich, French automobile and aircraft engine manufacturer Theodoric Thierry