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UEFA Euro 2004 Final

The UEFA Euro 2004 Final was a football match played on 4 July 2004 at the Estádio da Luz in Lisbon, Portugal to determine the winner of UEFA Euro 2004. The match featured tournament hosts Portugal, who went into the match as favourites, Greece, playing in only their second European Championship, it was the first time in a major international tournament where both finalists had played in the opening game of the tournament. Both teams had qualified for the knockout stage from Group A of the tournament's group stage, with Greece winning 2–1 in the teams' earlier meeting. Greece won the final 1–0, defying odds of 80–1 from the beginning of the tournament, with Angelos Charisteas scoring the winning goal in the 57th minute. Estádio da Luz in Lisbon, the biggest stadium by capacity in Portugal hosted UEFA Euro 2004 final match on 4 July 2004. Opened in 2003, it was built for hosting the home games of Portuguese club S. L. Benfica. Used for association football matches, Estádio da Luz hosted numerous notable matches, including UEFA Euro - Quarter-final between Portugal and England in 2004, UEFA Euro Final between Portugal and Greece in 2004, Champions League final between Real Madrid and Atlético Madrid in 2014.

3 group matches of Group A and B took place in the stadium during the UEFA Euro 2004. Estádio da Luz has a capacity of 65,000 seats. UEFA Euro 2004 official website

Marianne Schech

Marianne Schech was a German operatic soprano and academic who appeared internationally. She was a member of the Bavarian State Opera from 1946 to 1970, she is known for leading roles in works by Richard Wagner and Richard Strauss, for example, the Dyer's Wife in the U. S. premiere of Die Frau ohne Schatten by Richard Strauss at the San Francisco Opera in 1959. She made several recordings, including in 1951 the role of Elisabeth in Wagner's Tannhäuser, conducted by Robert Heger, in 1960 the role of Chrysothemis in Elektra by Richard Strauss, conducted by Karl Böhm, Senta in Wagner's Der fliegende Holländer, conducted by Franz Konwitschny. Born in Geltau near Bayrischzell, Schech studied at the Trapp'sches Konservatorium and at the Akademie der Tonkunst in Munich, she made her operatic debut at the Stadttheater Koblenz in 1937 in the role of Martha in d'Albert's Tiefland. In 1939, she moved to the Theater Münster, in 1941 to the Düsseldorf Opera. After World War II, Schech was a member of the Bavarian State Opera from 1946 to 1970.

In 1952, she appeared in Rio de Janeiro as Senta in Wagner's Der fliegende Holländer and as Isolde in his Tristan and Isolde. In 1957, she was the Dyer's Wife in Die Frau ohne Schatten by Richard Strauss at the Paris Opera, she appeared at the Vienna State Opera, in 1958 as Venus in Wagner's Tannhäuser and as Brünnhilde in his Siegfried, in 1962 as Brünnhilde in his Die Walküre and as the Marschallin in Der Rosenkavalier by Strauss. In 1959, she appeared as the Dyer's Wife in the U. S. premiere of the opera at the San Francisco Opera in 1959. Schech made several recordings, including in 1951 the role of Elisabeth in Wagner's Tannhäuser, conducted by Robert Heger, she recorded the role of Sieglinde in Die Walküre, Martha in Tiefland, the Marschallin and the Dyer's Wife, among others. In 1960, she recorded the role of Chrysothemis in Elektra by Richard Strauss, conducted by Karl Böhm with the Staatskapelle Dresden, alongside Inge Borkh in the title role and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau as Orest; the same year, she recorded Senta in Der fliegende Holländer, conducted by Franz Konwitschny with the Staatskapelle Berlin, alongside Fischer-Dieskau in the title role, Gottlob Frick as Daland and Fritz Wunderlich as the Steuermann.

Schech lectured at the Musikhochschule München from 1970, where Claudia Eder and Felicity Palmer were among her students. She died in Munich in 1999. Literature by and about Marianne Schech in the German National Library catalogue Discography on Discogs Marianne Schech on MusicMe Marianne Schech & Staatskapelle Dresden & Karl Böhm Amazon Marianne Schech.

Mayda Insula

Mayda Insula is an island in the Kraken Mare, a body of liquid composed of methane, on Saturn's largest moon Titan. Mayda Insula is the first island to be named on a moon other than Earth. Mayda Insula was discovered by the Cassini–Huygens mission to Saturn, its name was approved by the International Astronomical Union Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature on April 11, 2008, becoming the first named island on a planetary body other than earth, the largest. NASA notes, that the possibility Mayda Insula is peninsular cannot be conclusively ruled out. All of the insulae on Titan have been named for legendary islands and "Mayda Insula" was derived from the legendary island Mayda, thought to exist in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean, its name was approved the same day as the names of Ligeia Mare. Mayda Insula lies in the northern end of the Kraken Mare near Titan's north pole; the island has a northernmost latitude of 80.3 degrees north and a southernmost latitude of 77.4 degrees north. The island is 168 kilometres wide at its widest point.

Its dimensions are 90 by 150 kilometres, about the same size as the Big Island of Hawaii. The highest point of the interior of Mayda Insula is 1,200 metres above its shoreline. Slopes are mild at 1.5 degrees on average, though they can approach 5 degrees in some locations. Radar images of Titan's surface show that Mayda Insula's coasts display evidence of being changed by fluvial and lacustrine processes. Analyses of these fluvial features suggested that 2 km3 of material has been eroded from Mayda Insula and deposited elsewhere in the Kraken Mare basin. Mayda Insula features in Michael Carroll's novel On the Shores of Titan's Farthest Sea: A Scientific Novel; the 39th chapter of the book is titled "The Hunchback of Mayda Insula". Lakes of Titan List of geological features on Titan