United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2018

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United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2018

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

Alabama's seven seats in the United States House of Representatives

  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 6 1

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama will be held on November 6, 2018, to elect the seven U.S. Representatives from the state of Alabama, one from each of the state's seven congressional districts. The elections coincided with other elections to the House of Representatives, as well as elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on June 5, with all choosing a nominee except the Republican primary in the 2nd district, which will go to a July 17 runoff.[1]

District 1[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Bradley Byrne, who has represented the district since 2013. Byrne was re-elected with 96% of the vote in 2016, against nominal write-in opposition.

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Robert Kennedy Jr[2]
  • Lizzetta Hill McConnell, former president of NAACP Mobile County[3]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert Kennedy Jr. 27,562 80.8
Democratic Lizzetta Hill McConnell 6,562 19.2
Total votes 34,124 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Alabama's 1st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert Kennedy Jr.
Republican Bradley Byrne (incumbent)
Total votes

District 2[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Martha Roby, who has represented the district since 2011. Roby was re-elected with 49% of the vote in 2016.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee included Alabama's 2nd congressional district on its initial list of Republican-held seats considered targets in 2018.[5][6]

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Tabitha Isner, business analyst[7]
  • Audri Scott Williams[8]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tabitha Isner 20,244 60.4
Democratic Audri Scott Williams 13,249 39.6
Total votes 33,493 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Martha Roby (incumbent) 36,509 39.0
Republican Bobby Bright 26,297 28.1
Republican Barry Moore 18,105 19.3
Republican Rich Hobson 7,028 7.5
Republican Tommy Amason 5,693 6.1
Total votes 93,632 100.0

Runoff results[edit]

Republican primary runoff results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Martha Roby (incumbent) 48,277 68.0
Republican Bobby Bright 22,767 32.0
Total votes 71,044 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Alabama's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tabitha Isner
Republican Martha Roby (incumbent)
Total votes

District 3[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Mike Rogers, who has represented the district since 2003. Rogers was re-elected with 67% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mallory Hagan 21,382 65.8
Democratic Adia McClellan Winfrey 11,134 34.2
Total votes 32,516 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Alabama's 3rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mallory Hagan
Republican Mike Rogers (incumbent)
Independent Thomas "Sick of DC" Casson
Total votes

District 4[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Robert Aderholt, who has represented the district since 1997. Aderholt was re-elected with 99% of the vote in 2016 against nominal write-in opposition.

Democratic primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lee Auman 8,598 54.1
Democratic Rick Neighbors 7,286 45.9
Total votes 15,884 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 93,840 81.5
Republican Anthony Blackmon 21,331 18.5
Total votes 115,171 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Alabama's 4th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lee Auman
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent)
Total votes

District 5[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Mo Brooks, who has represented the district since 2011. Brooks was re-elected with 67% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Peter Joffrion, Former Huntsville City Attorney[18]

Republican primary[edit]

  • Mo Brooks, incumbent
  • Clayton Hinchman, businessman and former U.S. Army Captain[19]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mo Brooks (incumbent) 54,848 61.3
Republican Clayton Hinchman 34,686 38.7
Total votes 89,534 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Alabama's 5th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter Joffrion
Republican Mo Brooks (incumbent)
Total votes

District 6[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Gary Palmer, who has represented the district since 2015. Palmer was re-elected with 74% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

  • Danner Kline, businessman[20]

Republican primary[edit]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Alabama's 6th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Danner Kline
Republican Gary Palmer (incumbent)
Total votes

District 7[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Terri Sewell, who has represented the district since 2011. Sewell was re-elected with 98% of the vote in 2016 against nominal write-in opposition.

Democratic primary[edit]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Alabama's 7th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Terri Sewell (incumbent)
Total votes
Democratic hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ Legislatures, National Conference of State. "2018 State Primary Election Dates". www.ncsl.org. 
  2. ^ "Robert Kennedy Jr. is leading in polls. No, not that one". NBC News. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  3. ^ "Lizzetta McConnell launches Congressional campaign". www.alreporter.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  4. ^ a b c "2018 Alabama Election Results". Politico. June 8, 2018. Retrieved June 8, 2018. 
  5. ^ Cheney, Kyle (January 30, 2017). "Amid Democratic doldrums, DCCC identifies 2018 targets". Politico. Retrieved February 11, 2017. 
  6. ^ Sena, Dan (January 30, 2017). "House Democrats Playing Offense" (PDF). Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Retrieved February 11, 2017. 
  7. ^ "Isner seeking Democratic nomination for Second Congressional District | The Wetumpka Herald". www.thewetumpkaherald.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  8. ^ "Record number of black women are candidates in Alabama". NBC News. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  9. ^ "Tommy Amason announces run for Congress". www.alreporter.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  10. ^ "Former US Rep, Montgomery mayor Bright seeks return to Congress". Dothan Eagle. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  11. ^ "Longtime Roy Moore ally Rich Hobson seeks Alabama congressional seat". AL.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  12. ^ "Breaking: State Rep. Barry Moore Announces Run for U.S. Congress - Yellowhammer News". yellowhammernews.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  13. ^ "Alabama Rep. Martha Roby's reelection campaign endorsed by National Right to Life Committee - Yellowhammer News". yellowhammernews.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  14. ^ "Former Miss America Mallory Hagan announces run for Alabama congressional seat as Democrat". AL.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  15. ^ tlockette@annistonstar.com, Tim Lockette, Star Staff Writer,. "U.S. House to see rare Democratic primary". The Anniston Star. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  16. ^ Tribune, CHARLES WHISENANT The Arab. "AHS grad seeks Democratic nod for Congress". The Arab Tribune. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  17. ^ "Neighbors making second run at Congressional seat | Franklin Free Press". Franklin Free Press. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  18. ^ "Former Huntsville city attorney Peter Joffrion launches bid for Congress". AL.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  19. ^ "Clayton Hinchman is challenging Mo Brooks". www.alreporter.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  20. ^ "Free the Hops Founder to Run for Congress". www.bizjournals.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 

External links[edit]