United States presidential election in Colorado, 2016

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United States presidential election in Colorado, 2016

← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →
Turnout 72.9%
 
Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg
Gary Johnson June 2016.jpg
Nominee Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Gary Johnson
Party Democratic Republican Libertarian
Home state New York New York New Mexico
Running mate Tim Kaine Mike Pence William Weld
Electoral vote 9 0 0
Popular vote 1,338,870 1,202,484 144,121
Percentage 48.2% 43.3% 5.2%

Colorado Presidential Election Results 2016.svg
County Results

Colorado 2016 presidential results by county.png
Results by county showing number of votes by size and candidates by color

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Donald Trump
Republican

Treemap of the popular vote by county.

The 2016 United States presidential election in Colorado was held on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 General Election in which all 50 states plus The District of Columbia participated. Colorado voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting the Republican Party's nominee, businessman Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her running mate, Virginia Senator Tim Kaine.

On March 1, 2016, in the presidential primaries, Colorado voters expressed their preferences for the Democratic, Libertarian, Green Constitution, Nutrition, and Prohibition parties' respective nominees for president. The Republican Party did not hold a preference poll because the party decided to cancel it in August 2015.[1] Registered members of each party only voted in their party's primary, while unaffiliated voters were unable to participate.

Hillary Clinton won the election in Colorado with a plurality of 48.2% of the vote. Donald Trump received 43.3% of the vote, a Democratic margin of victory of 4.9%. This was the third time since achieving statehood that the Republican candidate won the election without carrying Colorado, and the second time since statehood that Colorado has voted Democratic in three consecutive presidential elections. No Republican had won the White House without carrying the state since 1908. Trump won five counties that had voted for President Obama in 2012; Conejos County, Chaffee County, Huerfano County, Las Animas County, and Pueblo County. The latter two counties had not supported a Republican for president since Richard Nixon's 49-state landslide in 1972.

Primary elections[edit]

Democratic caucuses[edit]

Colorado Democratic caucuses, 2016

← 2008 March 1, 2016 (2016-03-01) 2016 →
  Bernie Sanders September 2015 cropped.jpg Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Candidate Bernie Sanders Hillary Clinton
Home state Vermont New York
Delegate count 41 25
Popular vote 72,846 49,789
Percentage 58.98% 40.31%

Colorado Democratic presidential caucuses, 2016.svg
Colorado results by county
  Bernie Sanders
  Hillary Clinton
  Uncommitted

Opinion polling[edit]

Results[edit]

Caucus date
March 1, 2016


e • d Democratic Party's presidential nominating process in Colorado, 2016
– Summary of results –
Candidate Popular vote Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Bernie Sanders 72,846 58.98% 41 0 41
Hillary Clinton 49,789 40.31% 25 9 34
Uncommitted 822 0.67% 0 3 3
Others 51 0.04%
Total 123,508 100% 66 12 78
Sources: The Green Papers and Colorado Democrats 2016 Caucus results
Detailed estimates per congressional district
Detailed results for the Colorado Democratic caucuses, March 1, 2016[2]
District Total estimate Bernie Sanders Hillary Clinton
Votes Estimated
delegates
Votes Estimated
delegates
Votes Estimated
delegates
1st district 29,474 8 16,232 4 13,242 4
2nd district 30,624 7 19,376 4 11,248 3
3rd district 14,671 6 8,956 4 5,715 2
4th district 10,060 5 6,115 3 3,945 2
5th district 10,315 5 6,338 3 3,977 2
6th district 12,836 6 6,675 3 6,161 3
7th district 14,655 6 9,154 4 5,501 4
At-large delegates 122,635 14 72,846 8 49,789 6
Pledged PLEOs 9 5 4
Total 66 38 28

Results of the county assemblies Timeframe for the county assemblies: March 2–26, 2016

Colorado Democratic county assemblies, March 2–26, 2016
Candidate State + District delegates[3] Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Bernie Sanders 372 61.39%
Hillary Clinton 234 38.61%
Uncommitted
Total 606 100%
Results of the congressional district conventions
Detailed results for the congressional district conventions, April 1–15, 2016[2]
District Delegates
available
Delegates won
Sanders Clinton
1st district 8 5 3
2nd district 7 4 3
3rd district 6 4 2
4th district 5 3 2
5th district 5 3 2
6th district 6 3 3
7th district 6 4 2
Total 43 26 17
Results of the state convention

State convention date: April 16, 2016

Colorado Democratic State Convention, April 16, 2016[2]
Candidate State convention delegates National delegates won
Count Percentage At-large PLEO Total
Bernie Sanders 1,900 62.3% 9 6 15
Hillary Clinton 1,150 37.7% 5 3 8
Total 3,050 100.0% 14 9 23

Republican conventions[edit]

From April 2–8, 2016, conventions were held in each of Colorado's seven congressional districts. Cruz swept all seven, winning 21 delegates total.[4][5][6][7] On April 9, 2016, the state convention was held to elect the 13 statewide delegates and the 3 RNC delegates.[8] Again, Cruz won all 13 statewide at-large delegates.[9] Cruz was also the only candidate to address the state convention.

A proposal to forbid Colorado Republican delegates from voting for Donald Trump was written in March 2016 by Robert Zubrin,[10] the group "Colorado Republicans for Liberty" handed out fliers of Zubrin's resolution at the state's convention. Irregularities on the ballot were discovered at the state's convention. Delegate #379 (Jerome Parks, a Trump delegate) was replaced on the ballot with a duplicate of delegate #378 (a Ted Cruz delegate),[11] the Colorado Republican Party's Twitter account posted the message "We did it #NeverTrump" after Cruz received all the bound delegates at the April convention. The party claims somebody hacked its Twitter account, and the party claims to be investigating how the message was posted;[12][13] in May 2015, the Colorado Senate defeated a bill to hold a 2016 presidential primary. State senators Kevin Grantham, Kent Lambert, Laura J. Woods, and Jerry Sonnenberg voted to stop the bill.[14] Sonnenberg, Woods, Grantham, and Lambert are members of the Ted Cruz "Colorado Leadership Team" for Ted Cruz.[15] Congressman Ken Buck and Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams are also members of the Ted Cruz "Colorado Leadership Team".[15]

The conventions were selected through statewide caucuses, which were conducted at the precinct level on March 1.[8] No voter preference poll was held due to a decision in August by the state party to cancel it.[1]

Three candidates contested the Republican presidential conventions:

Marco Rubio and Ben Carson had dropped out of the race by the time the conventions were held, though they were still running during the March 1 caucuses.

Colorado Republican district conventions, April 2, 2016, April 7-8, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
Bound Unbound Total
America Symbol.svg Ted Cruz 0 0.0% 17 4 21
Donald Trump 0 0.0% 0 0 0
John Kasich 0 0.0% 0 0 0
Marco Rubio (withdrawn) 0 0.0% 0 0 0
Ben Carson (withdrawn) 0 0.0% 0 0 0
Uncommitted 0 0.0% 0 0 0
Unprojected delegates: 0 0 0
Total: 0 100.00% 17 4 21
Source: The Green Papers
Colorado Republican state convention, April 9, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
Bound Unbound Total
America Symbol.svg Ted Cruz 0 0.0% 13 0 13
Donald Trump 0 0.0% 0 1 1
John Kasich 0 0.0% 0 0 0
Marco Rubio (withdrawn) 0 0.0% 0 0 0
Ben Carson (withdrawn) 0 0.0% 0 0 0
Uncommitted 0 0.0% 0 0 0
Unprojected delegates: 0 2 2
Total: 0 100.00% 13 3 16
Source: The Green Papers

Green Party convention[edit]

On April 3, the Green Party of Colorado held a presidential nominating convention in Centennial, Colorado for registered Green voters.[16]

On April 4, the Green Party of Colorado announced that Jill Stein had won the convention and received all 5 delegates.[17]

Colorado Green Party Convention, April 3, 2016.
Candidate Votes Percentage National delegates
America Symbol.svg Jill Stein - - 5
William Kreml - - -
Kent Mesplay - - -
Sedinam Moyowasifza-Curry - - -
Darryl Cherney - - -
Uncommitted - - -
Total - - 5

Polling[edit]

Analysis[edit]

Historically, Colorado has been one of the most Republican states in the nation, having been one of the few states to vote against Franklin D. Roosevelt during the New Deal during the 1940 and the 1944 presidential elections. No Republican had won a presidential election without winning Colorado from 1908 through 2012: before 2008, Colorado had not voted Democrat in any presidential election with the exception of 1992 (where Bill Clinton won by a plurality) and 1964 (When Lyndon B. Johnson won in a landslide). However, increasing urbanization in the Front Range Urban Corridor, along with the growth of minority populations (especially Hispanics) have chipped away from Republican dominance in the state: while President George W. Bush won the state in the 2004 election, it was one of the few states where Republican performance fell (this time by half), leading to Barack Obama to carry the state twice in 2008 and 2012.

Trump improved upon previous Republican candidates in Southern Colorado, once the state's Democratic stronghold: however, the Democratic dominance of this blue collar, working class industrial area is starting to fade. Trump carried three of the area's counties (Conejos County, Las Animas County and Huerfano County), a feat not accomplished by any Republican since George H. W. Bush in his 1988 landslide: he also carried Pueblo County by a 0.49% margin, making it the closest county in the state.[18] Trump also did well in the Western Slope, where counties like Mesa County (home to Grand Junction) went for Trump on a 2-1 margin.

However, as is with the case with Nevada and other states in the American Southwest that have been experiencing increasing urbanization and a rapidly growing Hispanic population, Clinton won by running up the margins in the rapidly growing metro areas of the state - in this case, Denver and Colorado Springs. While Trump did win El Paso County (home of Colorado Springs), he won with only 56% of the vote, performing worse than McCain did in the 2008 election; Clinton made up for lost votes in rest of the state through larger margins in Boulder and the nearby Denver Metropolitan Area, where power is usually split between Democrats and moderate Republicans downballot: very rarely has any race statewide been won without carrying the area. Trump only won one county in the metro area (Douglas County - home to suburbs such as Parker, Highlands Ranch and Castle Rock), but with only 54% of the vote - one of the poorest performances in the area's most Republican county in decades. Clinton exceeded Obama's performance in the City and County of Denver and Boulder County, the Democrats' main base in Colorado; while she was not able to exceed Obama's performance in the suburban counties surrounding Denver, Trump posted some of the worst results Republicans have in decades in this region. Trump only won 39% of the vote in Arapahoe County, which includes some of the largest Denver suburbs such as Aurora and Centennial; before Obama won this county in 2008, this county had not gone Democratic since 1964 (not even Bill Clinton could win here even while he carried the state in 1992). Trump barely got over 40 percent in surrounding Jefferson and Adams counties (partially due to a surge in third party voters for Gary Johnson). The Republican losses in this vital area ultimately handed the state to Clinton.

In downballot races, Mike Coffman was ultimately able to hold on to his seat in a Clinton-carried district around Arapahoe County. Democrats made big gains in this area in the State House and Senate. However, Republicans were able to gain a seat in Adams County, ultimately holding on to the State Senate.

General election[edit]

Statewide results[edit]

U.S. presidential election in Colorado, 2016[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hillary Clinton 1,338,870 48.12%
Republican Donald Trump 1,202,484 43.31%
Libertarian Gary Johnson 144,121 5.17%
Green Jill Stein 38,437 1.37%
Independent Evan McMullin 28,917 1.04%
Constitution Darrell Castle 11,699 0.42%
Veterans Chris Keniston 5,028 0.18%
Independent Mike Smith 1,819 0.07%
American Delta Rocky De La Fuente 1,255 0.04%
Independent American Kyle Kopitke 1,096 0.04%
Independent Joseph Maldonado 872 0.03%
American Solidarity Michael A. Maturen 862 0.03%
Independent Rod Silva 751 0.03%
Independent Ryan Scott 749 0.03%
Independent Tom Hoefling 710 0.03%
Socialism and Liberation Gloria La Riva 531 0.02%
Socialist Workers Alyson Kennedy 452 0.02%
Independent Laurence Kotlikoff 392 0.01%
Independent Bradford Lyttle 382 0.01%
Independent Frank Atwood 337 0.01%
Socialist Mimi Soltysik 271 0.01%
Prohibition James Hedges 185 0.01%
[[|N/A]] Write-In 27 0.00%
Total votes 2,780,247 100.00%

By county[edit]

County Clinton% Clinton# Trump% Trump# Johnson% Johnson# Others% Others# Total[18]
Adams 49.86% 96,558 41.35% 80,082 5.11% 9,893 3.70% 7,144 193,677
Alamosa 45.96% 3,189 43.90% 3,046 5.84% 405 4.31% 299 6,939
Arapahoe 52.76% 159,885 38.63% 117,053 5.28% 16,002 3.33% 10,108 303,048
Archuleta 34.06% 2,500 58.10% 4,264 4.51% 331 3.32% 244 7,339
Baca 13.14% 283 81.42% 1,753 2.37% 51 3.07% 66 2,153
Bent 30.62% 590 61.65% 1,188 4.31% 83 3.42% 66 1,927
Boulder 70.34% 132,334 22.00% 41,396 4.27% 8,034 3.39% 6,381 188,145
Broomfield 52.35% 19,731 38.12% 14,367 5.77% 2,174 3.76% 1,418 37,690
Chaffee 43.45% 4,888 47.92% 5,391 4.77% 537 3.86% 434 11,250
Cheyenne 11.98% 132 83.94% 925 2.81% 31 1.26% 14 1,102
Clear Creek 46.52% 2,729 43.90% 2,575 6.22% 365 3.36% 197 5,866
Conejos 44.03% 1,771 47.59% 1,914 4.13% 166 4.25% 171 4,022
Costilla 60.88% 1,125 31.82% 588 4.49% 83 2.81% 52 1,848
Crowley 22.20% 339 70.66% 1,079 4.13% 63 3.02% 46 1,527
Custer 25.99% 797 67.22% 2,061 4.60% 141 2.18% 67 3,066
Delta 24.34% 4,087 69.42% 11,655 2.83% 475 3.41% 573 16,790
Denver 73.69% 244,551 18.89% 62,690 4.48% 14,861 2.94% 9,750 331,852
Dolores 19.28% 242 75.22% 944 2.47% 31 3.04% 38 1,255
Douglas 36.62% 68,657 54.71% 102,573 5.45% 10,212 3.23% 6,058 187,500
Eagle 55.90% 14,099 35.64% 8,990 5.42% 1,368 3.04% 766 25,223
El Paso 33.86% 108,010 56.19% 179,228 6.23% 19,877 3.71% 11,853 318,968
Elbert 19.61% 3,134 73.26% 11,705 4.17% 666 2.97% 475 15,980
Fremont 24.11% 5,297 68.82% 15,122 4.05% 890 3.03% 664 21,973
Garfield 42.58% 11,271 49.61% 13,132 4.29% 1,135 3.53% 932 26,470
Gilpin 45.69% 1,634 43.79% 1,566 5.40% 193 5.12% 183 3,576
Grand 39.10% 3,358 52.33% 4,494 5.67% 487 2.90% 249 8,588
Gunnison 54.48% 5,128 34.94% 3,289 6.32% 595 4.25% 400 9,412
Hinsdale 33.45% 197 57.56% 339 4.58% 27 4.42% 26 589
Huerfano 43.17% 1,633 49.78% 1,883 3.99% 151 3.06% 116 3,783
Jackson 19.86% 171 73.05% 629 4.76% 41 2.32% 20 861
Jefferson 48.89% 160,776 42.01% 138,177 5.64% 18,537 3.47% 11,393 328,883
Kiowa 10.64% 91 85.15% 728 2.81% 24 1.40% 12 855
Kit Carson 14.48% 536 80.15% 2,967 2.57% 95 2.81% 104 3,702
La Plata 49.84% 15,525 40.41% 12,587 6.03% 1,878 3.72% 1,160 31,150
Lake 50.52% 1,616 39.70% 1,270 5.41% 173 4.39% 140 3,199
Larimer 47.51% 93,113 42.57% 83,430 5.87% 11,510 4.04% 7,928 195,981
Las Animas 39.01% 2,650 54.62% 3,710 3.69% 251 2.68% 182 6,793
Lincoln 16.79% 409 77.67% 1,892 3.16% 77 2.38% 58 2,436
Logan 19.04% 1,851 74.90% 7,282 3.28% 319 2.78% 270 9,722
Mesa 27.98% 21,729 64.10% 49,779 4.73% 3,675 3.18% 2,471 77,654
Mineral 36.35% 237 52.76% 344 6.44% 42 4.45% 29 652
Moffat 13.39% 874 81.30% 5,305 2.74% 179 2.57% 167 6,525
Montezuma 30.90% 3,973 61.07% 7,853 4.23% 544 3.79% 488 12,858
Montrose 25.80% 5,466 67.88% 14,382 3.47% 735 2.85% 603 21,186
Morgan 26.35% 3,151 68.10% 8,145 2.93% 350 2.63% 314 11,960
Otero 34.82% 2,943 58.31% 4,928 3.79% 320 3.08% 261 8,452
Ouray 51.27% 1,697 40.82% 1,351 4.53% 150 3.38% 112 3,310
Park 32.84% 3,421 58.89% 6,135 4.89% 509 3.38% 352 10,417
Phillips 18.70% 436 76.80% 1,791 2.57% 60 1.93% 45 2,332
Pitkin 69.69% 7,333 24.23% 2,550 3.55% 374 2.53% 266 10,523
Prowers 23.64% 1,186 70.39% 3,531 3.09% 155 2.88% 144 5,016
Pueblo 45.62% 35,875 46.11% 36,265 5.18% 4,072 3.09% 2,434 78,646
Rio Blanco 12.64% 436 80.90% 2,791 3.42% 118 3.04% 105 3,450
Rio Grande 36.16% 2,001 55.75% 3,085 4.19% 232 3.90% 216 5,534
Routt 54.34% 7,600 37.39% 5,230 5.16% 722 3.10% 434 13,986
Saguache 49.98% 1,417 40.46% 1,147 3.25% 92 6.31% 179 2,835
San Juan 52.37% 265 42.49% 215 3.36% 17 1.79% 9 506
San Miguel 68.72% 2,975 23.86% 1,033 3.56% 154 3.87% 167 4,329
Sedgwick 19.57% 267 74.41% 1,015 2.05% 28 3.96% 54 1,364
Summit 59.09% 9,557 31.53% 5,100 6.18% 1,000 3.20% 517 16,174
Teller 24.94% 3,603 67.47% 9,745 4.67% 674 2.92% 422 14,444
Washington 10.83% 296 84.12% 2,299 3.00% 82 2.05% 56 2,733
Weld 34.45% 46,519 56.60% 76,651 5.53% 7,487 3.52% 4,773 135,430
Yuma 15.15% 726 80.36% 3,850 2.46% 118 2.02% 97 4,791
Colorado Total 48.16% 1,338,870 43.25% 1,202,484 5.18% 144,121 3.41% 94,772 2,780,247

By congressional district[edit]

Clinton won 4 of 7 congressional districts including one held by a Republican representative.[20]

District Trump Clinton Representative
1st 23% 69% Diana DeGette
2nd 35% 56% Jared Polis
3rd 52% 40% Scott Tipton
4th 57% 34% Ken Buck
5th 57% 33% Doug Lamborn
6th 41% 50% Mike Coffman
7th 40% 52% Ed Perlmutter

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b John Frank (25 August 2015). "Colorado Republicans cancel presidential vote at 2016 caucus". The Denver Post. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c "Colorado Democratic Delegation 2016". Thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  3. ^ "CDP National Delegate Candidates.xlsx" (PDF). Coloradodems.org. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  4. ^ "Ted Cruz wins first 6 Colorado delegates, Donald Trump shut out". The Spot. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  5. ^ Benjy Sarlin. "Colorado Loss Reveals Chaotic, Overwhelmed Trump Campaign". NBC News. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  6. ^ "2016 Presidential Caucuses & Conventions". thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  7. ^ "Ted Cruz Wins Majority of Delegates in Colorado". The New York Times. 9 April 2016. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  8. ^ a b "Colorado Republican Delegation 2016". thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  9. ^ John Frank & Joey Bunch (9 April 2016). "Ted Cruz dominates Colorado GOP convention winning all 34 delegates". The Denver Post. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  10. ^ "Blog: Colorado GOP resolution: No voting for Trump". americanthinker.com. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  11. ^ Benjy Sarlin. "Cruz Sweeps Colorado as Trump Campaign Issues Error-Filled Ballots". NBC News. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  12. ^ Oscar Contreras (2016-04-10). "Colorado GOP hastily deletes 'Never Trump' tweet following sweeping Ted Cruz delegate victory - 7NEWS Denver". Thedenverchannel.com. Retrieved 2016-11-13. 
  13. ^ "Colorado GOP deletes #nevertrump tweet, pledges investigation". POLITICO. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  14. ^ "Senate GOP kills party's own push for 2016 presidential primary". The Spot. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  15. ^ a b "Cruz for President Announces Colorado Leadership Team". Cruz for President. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  16. ^ "PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATION CONVENTION". Colorado Green Party. 2015-12-14. Retrieved 2016-02-20. 
  17. ^ "Green Party of Colorado". Retrieved 4 April 2016. 
  18. ^ a b http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/
  19. ^ Williams, Wayne W. (November 16, 2016). "Colorado Election Results". Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved November 16, 2016. 
  20. ^ http://www.swingstateproject.com/diary/4161/

External links[edit]