Victory Gardens, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Victory Gardens, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Victory Gardens
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Victory Gardens, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Victory Gardens, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°52′34″N 74°32′37″W / 40.876145°N 74.543502°W / 40.876145; -74.543502Coordinates: 40°52′34″N 74°32′37″W / 40.876145°N 74.543502°W / 40.876145; -74.543502[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated September 18, 1951
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
 • Mayor David Holeman Jr. (D, term ends December 31, 2017)[3][4]
 • Administrator / Municipal clerk Deborah Evans[5][6]
Area[1]
 • Total 0.146 sq mi (0.378 km2)
 • Land 0.146 sq mi (0.378 km2)
 • Water 0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank 563rd of 566 in state
39th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 646 ft (197 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 1,520
 • Estimate (2016)[12] 1,519
 • Rank 513th of 566 in state
39th of 39 in county[13]
 • Density 10,419.2/sq mi (4,022.9/km2)
 • Density rank 35th of 566 in state
1st of 39 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07801 - Dover[14]
Area code(s) 862/973 and 908[15]
FIPS code 3402775890[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885427[1][18]
Website www.victorygardensnj.gov

Victory Gardens is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,520,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 26 (-1.7%) from the 1,546 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 232 (+17.7%) from the 1,314 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Victory Gardens is Morris County's smallest municipality, measured both by size and population, and its most densely populated.[20]

History[edit]

The origins of the borough began in 1941, when the federal government acquired 91 acres (370,000 m2) in Randolph Township as the site of a 300-unit housing project for war industry employees. The borough's name is derived from the victory gardens planted at homes and parks during World War II to provide additional supplies of fruits and vegetables,[21][22] the federal government paid for all infrastructure. Streets are named for U.S. Presidents.[23]

Randolph Township residents approved a referendum as part of a September 1951 special election in which voters were asked if the township's Victory Gardens neighborhood should be removed from the township and created as an independent municipality for its 1,300 residents covering 92 acres (37 ha).[24] Residents of other areas of Randolph Township argued that the compensation paid by the federal government for the more than 250 students attending the Randolph Township Schools did not adequately cover the cost of their public education, that the housing and other structures in Victory Gardens was out of compliance with the Township's building and zoning ordinances and that the overwhelming Democratic Party political leanings of residents of Victory Gardens were out of sync with the largely Republican Party township.[25]

Victory Gardens was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on June 20, 1951, from portions of Randolph Township, based on the results of the referendum passed on September 18, 1951.[26][27]

A project approved in 1973 brought the construction of 184 units of garden apartments on a site covering 12.4 acres (5.0 ha), providing additional rateables and offering permanent housing for an estimated 400 people, that would contrast with the temporary original structures built in the 1940s that had long passed their expected lifespan.[28]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.146 square miles (0.378 km2), all of which is land.[1][2]

The borough borders the Morris County municipalities of Dover and Randolph.[29]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 1,085
1970 1,027 −5.3%
1980 1,043 1.6%
1990 1,314 26.0%
2000 1,546 17.7%
2010 1,649 6.7%
Est. 2016 1,519 [12][30] −7.9%
Population sources:1960-1990[31]
2000[32][33] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,520 people, 533 households, and 398.2 families residing in the borough. The population density was 10,419.2 per square mile (4,022.9/km2). There were 566 housing units at an average density of 3,879.8 per square mile (1,498.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 58.49% (889) White, 16.25% (247) Black or African American, 0.66% (10) Native American, 2.43% (37) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 17.43% (265) from other races, and 4.74% (72) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 62.96% (957) of the population.[9]

There were 533 households out of which 41.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.0% were married couples living together, 21.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 3.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.16.[9]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 34.2% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 6.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.3 years. For every 100 females there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.8 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $53,269 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,599) and the median family income was $52,500 (+/- $6,885). Males had a median income of $34,063 (+/- $5,135) versus $33,750 (+/- $9,755) for females, the per capita income for the borough was $18,340 (+/- $1,640). About 11.9% of families and 16.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.6% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 1,546 people, 564 households, and 381 families residing in the borough, the population density was 10,582.6 people per square mile (3,979.4/km2). There were 588 housing units at an average density of 4,025.0 per square mile (1,513.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 51.36% White, 21.41% African American, 0.06% Native American, 5.43% Asian, 15.27% from other races, and 6.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 50.65% of the population.[32][33]

15.27% of Victory Gardens residents identified themselves as being of Colombian ancestry in the 2000 Census, the highest percentage of the population of any municipality in the United States.[35]

There were 564 households out of which 39.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.3% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.3% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.21.[32][33]

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 39.3% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 5.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years, for every 100 females there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.3 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,375, and the median income for a family was $43,594. Males had a median income of $32,841 versus $24,875 for females, the per capita income for the borough was $20,616. About 8.9% of families and 8.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.4% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Victory Gardens is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, the governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office, the Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Victory Gardens, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie, the mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[36][37]

As of 2016, the Mayor of Victory Gardens is Democrat David L. Holeman Jr., whose term of office ends December 31, 2016. Members of the Borough Council are Vera Cheatham (D, 2016), Ondria Garcia-Montes (D, 2018), James R. Glass (D, 2016; elected to serve an unexpired term), Veronica Hedgepath (D, 2018), Wayne Jacobus (D, 2017) and Ismael Lorenzo Sr. (D, 2017).[3][38][39][40][41][42][43][44]

Joan Cegelka won election in November 2013 to serve the balance of the term expiring in 2014 that had been held by David Holeman before he took office as mayor, with Vera Cheatham winning re-election to a full three-year term and Independent Hector Lorenzo Jr. knocking off incumbent Sonia Hall for terms starting January 1, 2014.[45]

In December 2010, Councilmember Ondria Garcia-Montes was placed on probation for 12 months after an incident in which she falsely told police that a criminal suspect who was the subject of a search warrant was not in her apartment.[46]

Dover serves as the lead agency operating a joint municipal court that include Victory Gardens and the neighboring municipalities of Mine Hill Township, Mount Arlington and Wharton.[47] Established in 2009, the joint municipal court was forecast to offer annual savings in excess of $250,000 over the 10-year life of the agreement.[48]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Victory Gardens is located in the 11th Congressional District[49] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[10][50][51]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[52] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[53] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, 2019).[54][55]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[56] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[57] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[58]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election, the Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[59] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni,[60] as of 2016, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, term ends December 31, 2016),[61] Deputy Freeholder William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2017),[62] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[63] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[64] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (Montville, 2016)[65] Christine Myers (Mendham Township, 2018),[66] and Deborah Smith (Denville, 2018).[67][60][68] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[69] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[70] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2019).[60][71]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 523 registered voters in Victory Gardens, of which 234 (44.7%) were registered as Democrats, 58 (11.1%) were registered as Republicans and 231 (44.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[72]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 81.8% of the vote (301 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 17.7% (65 votes), and other candidates with 0.5% (2 votes), among the 372 ballots cast by the borough's 565 registered voters (4 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 65.8%.[73][74] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 77.4% of the vote (302 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 21.0% (82 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (2 votes), among the 390 ballots cast by the borough's 575 registered voters, for a turnout of 67.8%.[75] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 63.7% of the vote (209 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 32.9% (108 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (2 votes), among the 328 ballots cast by the borough's 515 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 63.7.[76]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie and Democrat Barbara Buono each received 48.4% of the vote (90 cast), ahead of other candidates with 3.2% (6 votes), among the 224 ballots cast by the borough's 556 registered voters (38 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 40.3%.[77][78] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 58.4% of the vote (118 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 27.2% (55 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.4% (17 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (1 votes), among the 202 ballots cast by the borough's 544 registered voters, yielding a 37.1% turnout.[79]

Education[edit]

Victory Gardens is a non-operating school district, with all public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade in Victory Gardens attending the schools of the Dover School District in Dover, which has been consolidated between the two municipalities since 2010.[80][81] Schools in the Dover district (with 2011-12 enrollment from the National Center for Education Statistics[82]) are Academy Street Elementary School[83] (grades K-6, 511 students), East Dover Elementary School[84] (K-6, 439), North Dover Elementary School[85] (PreK-6, 675), Dover Middle School[86] (7-8, 475) and Dover High School[87] (9-12, 868).[88][89] Public school students in grades 7-12 from Mine Hill Township attend Dover Middle School and Dover High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Mine Hill School District,[90] the high school was recognized with the National Blue Ribbon School Award in 2013.[91]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 2.89 miles (4.65 km) of roadways, of which 2.78 miles (4.47 km) were maintained by the municipality and 0.11 miles (0.18 km) by Morris County.[92]

County Route 665 (South Salem Street) runs through the northwest corner of the borough, connecting Randolph on both sides.[93]

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit offers local bus service on the 875 route.[94][95] NJ Transit had previously offered service in the borough on the MCM2 and MCM7 routes.[96][97]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Borough Government, Borough of Victory Gardens. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  4. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017, as of date accessed, Holeman is listed as mayor with an incorrect term-end year of 2018.
  5. ^ Office of the Clerk, Borough of Victory Gardens. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  6. ^ Telephone Directory, Borough of Victory Gardens. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 116.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Victory Gardens, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Victory Gardens borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Victory Gardens borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 23, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Victory Gardens, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Victory Gardens, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  20. ^ GCT-PH1: Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  21. ^ History, Borough of Victory Gardens. Accessed October 18, 2015. "The borough was named for the victory gardens planted at private residences during World War II."
  22. ^ "Victory Gardens: a tiny town with an interesting past", Hidden New Jersey, March 28, 2013. Accessed October 18, 2015. "As you might have guessed from the name, Victory Gardens was born during World War II as housing for workers who were employed at nearby Picatinny Arsenal and other private defense contractors manufacturing war goods."
  23. ^ Victory Gardens profile, Morris County, New Jersey, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 28, 2007. Accessed August 29, 2011.
  24. ^ Staff. "COMMUNITY SEPARATES; Federal Housing Project Is Split From Jersey Township", The New York Times, September 19, 1951. Accessed November 10, 2013. "Randolph Township voters decided tonight by a margin of twenty-four ballots to discontinue a Federal housing development as part of the township."
  25. ^ "TOWNSHIP TO VOTE ON EXCLUDING AREA; Randolph, N.J., to Decide by Ballot Tomorrow Fate of Victory Gardens Section", The New York Times, September 17, 1951. Accessed November 10, 2013. "Citizens in near-by Randolph Township will ballot Tuesday to decide whether the Victory Gardens section should be excluded from the township and ordered to form a municipality of its own."
  26. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 197. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  27. ^ Historical Timeline of Morris County Boundaries, Morris County Library. Accessed December 24, 2016. "1951, September. Victory Gardens is established from Randolph. Victory Gardens had been a temporary community of defense industry workers during World War II whose municipal services were provided by Randolph Township, from PL 1951, c. 259."
  28. ^ Staff. "Victory Gardens Expanding", The New York Times, March 11, 1973. Accessed November 10, 2013. "VICTORY GARDENS-This tiny community, which faces an uncertain future, is engaged in its biggest expansion ever, the development of Carmel Gardens, a 184-unit garden-apartment complex on 12.4 acres of land."
  29. ^ Areas touching Victory Gardens, MapIt. Accessed October 17, 2015.
  30. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  31. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Victory Gardens borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Victory Gardens borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 19, 2012.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Victory Gardens borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  35. ^ Colombian Communities, EPodunk. Accessed August 23, 2006.
  36. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  37. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  38. ^ 2016 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Victory Gardens. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  39. ^ Morris County Manual 2016, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  40. ^ Morris County Municipal Elected Officials For The Year 2016, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk, updated June 3, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  41. ^ November 3, 2015 Official General Election Winners, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  42. ^ November 4, 2014 General Election Winners, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  43. ^ November 5, 2013 General Election Winners, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  44. ^ General Election 2012 November 6, 2012 Subdivision Report Morris County UNOFFICIAL RESULTS for Victory Gardens Borough, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 6, 2012, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 25, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  45. ^ Staff. "Morris County election results 2013: Local, county, school races", The Star-Ledger, November 5, 2013. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  46. ^ Horowitz, Ben. "N.J. councilwoman is placed on probation, pre-trial program for allegedly hiding suspect", The Star-Ledger, December 15, 2010. Accessed August 29, 2011.
  47. ^ Mayor and Board of Aldermen, Town of Dover Minutes of the Reorganization Meeting for January 1, 2015, Town of Dover. Accessed July 29, 2015.
  48. ^ Forrest, Cindy. "Victory Gardens Council judges proposal for joint municipal court", The Record (Bergen County), May 18, 2012. Accessed July 29, 2015. "With Dover as the lead agency, four other area towns - Rockaway Borough, Wharton, Mine Hill, and Mt. Arlington - entered into a landmark municipal court shared-services agreement in 2009 anticipating an estimated $2.65 million savings over the 10-year life of the contract."
  49. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  50. ^ 2017 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  51. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  52. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  53. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  54. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  55. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  56. ^ Legislative Roster 2016-2017 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 17, 2016.
  57. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  58. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  59. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  60. ^ a b c Morris County Manual 2016, Morris County Clerk. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  61. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  62. ^ William “Hank” Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  63. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  64. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  65. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  66. ^ Christine Myers, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  67. ^ Deborah Smith, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  68. ^ Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  69. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  70. ^ About Us: Sheriff Edward V. Rochford, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  71. ^ Morris County Surrogate Court, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  72. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 23, 2012.
  73. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  74. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  75. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 23, 2012.
  76. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 23, 2012.
  77. ^ "Governor - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  78. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  79. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 23, 2012.
  80. ^ Martin, Liz. "Voters have their say on the budgets", Neighbor News, April 28, 2010. Accessed July 11, 2016. "The school board goes from 11 members to 10 after this election as the temporary Board seat assigned to the Victory Gardens representative Danielle Press expired permanently on April 20. Now that Victory Gardens has merged with the Dover school district, there will no longer be a dedicated Victory Gardens seat on the Board. Any resident from either Dover or Victory Gardens will be eligible to run for any available Board seat."
  81. ^ 13 Non-Operating School Districts Eliminated, New Jersey Department of Education press release dated July 1, 2009. Accessed July 11, 2016.
  82. ^ School Data for the Dover School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 23, 2012.
  83. ^ Academy Street Elementary School, Dover School District. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  84. ^ East Dover Elementary School, Dover School District. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  85. ^ North Dover Elementary School, Dover School District. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  86. ^ Dover Middle School, Dover School District. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  87. ^ Dover High School, Dover School District. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  88. ^ Schools Listing, Dover School District. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  89. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Dover School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  90. ^ Dover High School 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 11, 2016. "Dover High School, located 40 miles from New York City, services approximately 900 high school students from the Town of Dover, the Borough of Victory Gardens, and the Township of Mine Hill."
  91. ^ 2013 National Blue Ribbon Schools; All Public and Private, United States Department of Education. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  92. ^ Morris County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  93. ^ Morris County Route 665 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, October 2000. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  94. ^ Riding the Bus, Morris County Department of Transportation. Accessed October 29, 2014.
  95. ^ Morris County System Map, NJ Transit. Accessed August 5, 2015.
  96. ^ Morris County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed December 23, 2012.
  97. ^ Private Carrier Bus Service reductions, NJ Transit. Accessed August 3, 2015.

External links[edit]