Wah Ching

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Wah Ching (華青),
Wah Ching Bloods
Founded1960s
Founding locationSan Francisco, California, United States
Years active1960s – present[citation needed]
Territory(Head Quarters) San Francisco, California, San Francisco Bay Area, Reno, Nevada, Los Angeles, California, Santa Ana, California, United States, China
EthnicityChinese Americans, Japanese Americans, Filipinos, Cambodian Americans, Vietnamese Americans, Korean Americans
Membership35,000-50,000
Criminal activitiesmurder, arms trafficking, Drug trafficking, extortion, money laundering, prostitution, illegal gambling, loan sharking, fraud, counterfeit, software piracy
Allies14K Triad, Tiny Rascal Gang, Oriental Lazy Boyz, Asian Society, Hop Sing Boys, Hop Sing Tong, Bloods, D.C. Blacks, Tokyo Boyz (Sub-Set), Beijing Boyz (Sub-Set), Gulf Cartel, Sinaloa Cartel, Latin Kings, Hidden Valley Kings, Apache Kings, Bamboo Union, Flying Dragons, Golden Raskal Dragons, Silver Raskal Dragons, Menace of Destruction, Juche gang, Wo Hop To and other Wo family Triads
RivalsAryan Brotherhood, Asian Boyz, Crips (some sets), Vietnamese Boyz, Jackson Street Boys, Black Dragons (gang), Joe Boys, MS-13, La Raza, Sun Yee On, 5T

Wah Ching (traditional Chinese: 華青; simplified Chinese: 华青; pinyin: Huá Qīng) is a Chinese American/Japanese American Triad secret society, and blood affiliated hybrid street gang also known as "Dub C" or "Insane Dragons" originating in San Francisco, California during the early 1960s. The Wah Ching is organized into one large gang; the Wah Ching controls a large portion of the criminal vices throughout the San Francisco and Los Angeles Asian American communities. Wah Ching often uses the number 23 to represent themselves and is also believed to have members in the United States military, government positions, and law enforcement;[1] the Wah Ching is involved in crimes ranging from street level narcotic sales, to plots to assassinate the president of Taiwan.[2]

History[edit]

Wah Ching is composed mainly of young men. Triad member clothing ranges from casual to business attire making it hard for officials to distinguish them from other citizens. Wah Ching first received widespread media attention because of the 1977 Golden Dragon Massacre (GDM) involving another Chinese gang, the Chung Ching Yee Joe Boys (JBS); the event took place at the Golden Dragon Restaurant in San Francisco's Chinatown. Five people were killed, and eleven others were injured. None of the victims were gang members. Five Joe Boys members were convicted of the shooting; the cause of the attack was vandalism by Wah Ching to the graves of several Joe Boy members and a shootout that took place a few months earlier that left one Joe Boy dead and two others wounded.[3][4] After the shootout occurred, the Wah Ching, though none were killed or even injured in the attack, still killed at least 7 Joe Boys in retaliation.

In 1991, Danny "Ah Pai" Wong, the leader of Wah Ching, was shot and killed by Wo Hop To (WHT) hitmen. After the murder, most of the Wah Ching began working with the Wo Hop To, it is believed that the remaining Wah Ching who refused to work with the Wo Hop To defected and created the Jackson Street Boys [5]

The Wah Ching Gang has an ongoing conflict with another rival Asian gang in Los Angeles, the Asian Boyz (ABZ) who also aligned themselves with the Vietnamese Boyz (VBZ) in opposition to Wah Ching. Wah Ching's move from its original home in the Bay Area to the southern California region is probably one of the sources of the disputes over gang turf. Over the decades, the Wah Ching has evolved from a street gang to an organized crime group, though still having an extremely active and rapidly growing street presence in Asian communities. There is law enforcement anecdotal evidence that suggests as a group the gang has developed strong associations with other Asian organized crime groups, such as the Wo Hop To and 14K Triads in Hong Kong.

Currently, the gang have shown signs of mixed ideology. Despite the fact that Wah Ching in Chinese literally means "Chinese Youth", there are still some individuals of non-Chinese descent who claim Wah Ching; the gang now consists of a large number of Vietnamese, Japanese, and Hmong members. The same applies with their rivals, the Vietnamese Boyz, who have a great number of Chinese members, it is rumored that their reasoning for this is that it is the "Chinese Youth" gang, and that the members working or fighting for the gang do not have to be of Chinese ethnicity.

The Wah Ching Gang may also be seen in black, red, and grey.

Rivalries/Notable crimes[edit]

The Wah Ching has been in a long conflict with the Asian Boyz.[6] One of the first shootouts between the two the gangs occurred in the 1990s; the shooting occurred in El Monte at a pool hall. An Asian Boyz gang member, Lea Mek, was killed by Wah Ching gang member Chieu Luong Yang. Another shootout between the two gangs occurred in San Marino that led to the deaths of two youths at a San Marino High School graduation party in June. After an investigation by the authorities, police claimed that when the Asian Boyz gang members arrived to the party, they saw that Wah Ching gang members were there, so they left and came back later with weapons to open fire on the latter. Over nine gang members were arrested. Police searched the homes of the gang members and seized five weapons; the shootouts between the two gangs were called "Summer Madness" by the Asian Boyz gang and resulted in at least 42 deaths on both sides.).[7][6]

in 2001, a 17–year–old Wah Ching member, who was an advanced placement student at Diamond Bar High School, shot and killed two members of the rival San Gabriel Killas (SGK) while attending a football game.

On December 2005, a 20 year old Wah Ching member murdered a Chicano man with unknown gang affiliation by running over him with a car in front of his house, he repeatedly backed over the man with the car while holding down the car's horn to ensure that neighbors in the area saw the act.

On June 2, 2007, Anh Duoc Nguyen, a member of Monterey Park-Side Wah Ching shot at five people in Westminster's Bowling Green Park, severely injuring one; the shootout was believed to be motivated by the fact that one of the victims changed his Myspace page bio to read "garden gang".

Sometime in 2009, a 14 year old member of Ocean-Side Wah Ching got into an argument with members of a rival Hispanic gang. During the argument, police report that one of the Hispanic gang members called the Asian teen a "Chink", and told him to "Go back to China"; the Wah Ching gangster responded to the racial slur by pulling out a .45 caliber pistol and shooting the rival gang member 7 times.

In 2011, A police raid in San Gabriel Valley dubbed "Operation Paint it Black" led to the arrests of 18 Wah Ching gang members, the seizure of 12,500 ecstasy pills, over 2,000 marijuana plants, and 70 firearms, 27 of which were fully automatic.[8]

Organization/Sides[edit]

The Wah Ching is extremely organized, its main structure consists of one main boss under the union and various factions called "sides" who have leaders or "Lung Tao" (Dragon Heads) who work together to organize their syndicates with the sole purpose of making money; the number of members in each side can vary anywhere from a few dozen to a couple thousand, and the total number of sides is believed to be around 10. [9]

L.A./Southern California sides of the Wah Ching:

Sonny-Side (SS-23) - One of the four original sides, estimated membership of ~4,000.

Ken-Side (KS-23) - One of the four original sides, estimated membership of ~5,000.

Paul A.-Side (PS-23) - One of the four original sides, estimated membership of ~2,000 in the Greater Los Angeles area. Notable for generating the most income out of the entire organization through legal means. Paul A. is the youngest member of Wah Ching to hold the position of Triad Boss also known as Dragon Head in the history of the Wah Ching Gang.In recent years it is rumored he has appointed a new Head to take his position.

Taiwanese-Side (TS-23/Taiwanese Sunny Side-23/) - One of the four original sides, estimated membership of ~20

Monterey Park-Side (MP-Side/ MP-23) - Located in Monterey Park, MP-Side is infamous for its narcotics sales and involvement in mass shootings, and along with Alhambra side was founded by members of Ken-Side and Sonny-Side.

Alhambra-Side (A-Side/ AS-23) - Located in Alhambra, A-Side was founded by members of Ken-Side and Sonny-Side.

Ocean-Side (OS-23) - Although a relatively new side, Ocean-Side has gained a reputation for being extremely violent and committing an abundant number of crimes.

Flip-Side (FS-23) - A side of the Wah Ching composed mainly of Filipinos, Flip-Side was believed to be the side that affiliated the Wah Ching with Bloods.

Dark-Side (DS-23) - One member from Ken-Side formed this side by clusters of combined gangs from McFadden Block, Viet Riders(located San Jose, California), and Asian Family, which most of the members located in small area of Santa Ana in Orange County. The extensive crimes that this syndicate performed are Identity Theft, Drug Trafficking, Credit Card Fraud aka Carding(ram), Hacking, Home Invasion, Murder, Robbery, Grand Theft Auto, and Extortion; the members of this side are mainly native Vietnamese or Vietnamese Americans.

The four original sides, Ken-Side, Paul-Side, T-Side, and Sonny-Side have a close relationship with one another and high-ranking members from those sides are believed to be unified under the highly sophisticated "Black Lotus Syndicate"

The known East-Bay/Northern California Sides:

510-side (EO-23) - Located in East Oakland, this side was founded by OG members of Wah Ching, and some Hop Sing Boys. The gang became infamous for its ruthlessness after requiring newly initiated members to "23-mark" a rival gang member; this initiation required one to beat a rival gang member either to death or to the point of unconsciousness, then to take a knife and carve a phrase such as "Wah Ching" or "Property of EO-23" onto the victims chest or forehead.

Jackson-Side (Insane-Side Dragon Tribe/Tokyo Boyz/Beijing Boyz/JS-23) - Jackson-Side was founded by members of Alhambra-Side and Monterey Park-Side who went back to San Francisco to reestablish the gang's presence. When it was founded, Jackson-Side had no more than 100 members. However, shortly after it was founded, Jackson-Side merged with a local Japanese-American street gang known as Tokyo Boyz and local Chinese-American street gang Beijing Boyz, soon after a few years, Jackson-Side grew to over 1,000 members. Recently, Jackson-Side Wah Ching has been more commonly known as Insane-Side Wah Ching, due to the Wah Ching's rivalry with the similarly named Jackson Street Boys as well as the gang's habit for gruesome crimes such as 23-marking. Jackson-Side Wah Ching gang members are also recognized Chinese Playground Boys.

70-Side (X7-23) 70-Side is a defunct side of the Wah Ching that was located on Alameda Island.

The main organization of The Wah Ching remains a mystery as they keep their syndicate extremely secretive. Only three official members may know the identity of their Lung Tao.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2011 National gang threat assessment". FBI. November 8, 2011. Retrieved February 19, 2019.
  2. ^ "Life and Violent Death of Tony Young". SCMP. November 17, 2017. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  3. ^ Make First Arrest in Golden Dragon Massacre of 1977, UPI, March 24, 1978.
  4. ^ "People v. Yu (1983) 143 Cal.App.3d 358 , 191 Cal.Rptr. 859". Court of Appeals of California. Retrieved February 10, 2014.
  5. ^ "Asian gang Chief takes fifth". LA times. November 6, 1991. Retrieved February 19, 2015.
  6. ^ a b "Multi Agency Effort to Bring Two Violent Gang members to Justice". lapdonline.org. Retrieved February 14, 2015.
  7. ^ Viki Torres (August 19, 1994). "Officials Link Gang Rivalry to Party Slayings". LA Times. Retrieved February 14, 2015.
  8. ^ "18 arrested in operation targeting San Gabriel Valley Asian gangs". WDN. May 21, 2011. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  9. ^ "Asian Boyz Gang vs Wah Ching Gang in Los Angeles - Asian Boyz Gang Documentary". gangland. May 21, 2010. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
  10. ^ . April 3, 2003 http://www.streetgangs.com/billboard/viewtopic.php?t=2585. Retrieved January 11, 2019. Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links[edit]