William Cautley

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William Oldfield Cautley
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Waimea
In office
24 May 1854 – 26 May 1854
Succeeded by William Travers
Personal details
Born 1822
Buckinghamshire, England
Died (1864-02-17)17 February 1864
London, England
Residence Richmond, New Zealand

William Oldfield Cautley JP (1822 – 17 February 1864) was a New Zealand settler and politician.

Early life and family[edit]

Cautley was born in the English county of Buckinghamshire in 1822, the son of the Reverend Richard Cautley.[1] He was educated at Uppingham School from 1837 to 1840, where he was an exhibitioner on leaving,[2] and then matriculated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge in the Michaelmas term, 1840.[1]

However, in September 1841 he sailed from West India Docks on the Mary Ann, bound for the New Zealand Company's new settlement of Nelson, landing there on 8 February 1842.[3] He began farming a property known as "Wensley Hill" at Waimea East (now called Richmond).[4][5]

In September 1842 Cautley was appointed as the Nelson postmaster and clerk to magistrates,[6] and in 1848 he was appointed a Justice of the Peace for the province of New Munster.[7]

Political career[edit]

New Zealand Parliament
Years Term Electorate Party
1853–1854 1st Waimea Independent

In 1850, Cautley was appointed as a member of the short-lived Legislative Council of the province of New Munster.[8]

In the 1853 general election, Cautley was elected as representative for the Waimea electorate alongside David Monro. The first session of the 1st New Zealand Parliament started on 24 May 1854, and Cautley resigned his seat on 26 May 1854. He did not serve in any further Parliaments.[9]

In November 1854, Cautley was elected as a member for Waimea East on the Nelson Provincial Council following the death of sitting member Francis Otterson. Cautley defeated Stephen Lunn Müller by 54 votes to 40.[10][11]

Later life[edit]

Cautley died in London on 17 February 1864, after a long illness.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Venn, J.A. (1940). Alumni Cantabrigienses, Part II, Volume I. Cambridge University Press. p. 542. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  2. ^ Uppingham School Roll, 1824 to 1905. London: Edward Stanford. 1906. p. 13. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  3. ^ "Early settlers database – passenger details". Nelson Provincial Museum. 2013. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  4. ^ The Cyclopedia of New Zealand: Nelson, Marlborough & Westland provincial districts. Christchurch: Cyclopedia Company. 1906. p. 33. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  5. ^ "Advertisements". Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle. 7 February 1846. p. 193. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  6. ^ "Blue Books 1840–1855" (PDF). Archives New Zealand. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  7. ^ "Magistrates". Rootsweb. Retrieved 4 July 2010. 
  8. ^ "Colonial Secretary's Office". Wellington Independent. 10 August 1850. p. 3. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  9. ^ Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand parliamentary record, 1840-1984 (4 ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103. 
  10. ^ "Waimea East election". Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle. 11 November 1854. p. 2. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  11. ^ "Waimea East election". Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle. 15 November 1854. p. 2. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  12. ^ "Died". Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle. XXIII (54). 5 May 1864. p. 2. Retrieved 4 July 2010. 
New Zealand Parliament
New constituency Member of Parliament for Waimea
1853–1854
Served alongside: David Monro
Succeeded by
William Travers