Williamson College

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Williamson College
Williamson College Logo.png
Former names
Williamson Christian College (1997-2013).[1]
Motto "Equipping Minds, Engaging Hearts, and Following Christ"
Type Private
Established 1997[2]
Affiliation Christian Nondenominational
President Dr. Ed Smith[3]
Vice-president Dr. Todd Bradley[4]
Academic staff
54
Administrative staff
12
Students <1000
Postgraduates <100
Location Franklin, TN, USA
35°57′22″N 86°49′42″W / 35.9562°N 86.8282°W / 35.9562; -86.8282Coordinates: 35°57′22″N 86°49′42″W / 35.9562°N 86.8282°W / 35.9562; -86.8282
Colors maroon and gold          
Affiliations Association for Biblical Higher Education, Evangelical Council For Financial Accountability
Website www.williamsoncc.edu

Williamson College is a private, non-profit[5] Christian college in Franklin, Tennessee, United States.[6] It was founded in 1997 as Williamson Christian College.[7]

History[edit]

Williamson Christian College was founded in 1997 by Dr. Kenneth Oosting.[8] Oosting was the former dean of Milligan College and an educational business consultant.[9] The college was named after Williamson County, where it is located. It has a focus on business, leadership, and ministry academics.[10]

The college was initially incorporated with the Tennessee Secretary of State in December 1996, officially receiving approval from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission in April 1997, and classes starting in 1998. It first received accreditation in 2002. Oosting retired from his position as president in 2008.[11] Stephen Higgins succeeded Oosting as President[12] and retired in 2012. The current president of the college, Dr. Ed Smith, was sworn in on November 11, 2012.[13]

For the college's 10th anniversary[14] it hosted former Arkansas Governor and 2008 and 2016 Presidential candidate Mike Huckabee to speak about the upcoming primaries and the importance of higher education.[15]

In 2012, the college moved from its initial location to its current campus at 274 Mallory Station Road in the Cool Springs area of Franklin.[16] The following year, the name of the school was changed to Williamson College.

In 2014, Williamson College began a program in partnership with the Williamson County Sheriffs Office[17] to educate inmates in Williamson County jails.[18]

Accreditation and affiliation[edit]

Williamson College is accredited by the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE).[19] The college received national accreditation by the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools from 2002 to 2007,[20] until it received accreditation from ABHE. The college is authorized to grant degrees by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission.[21][22] The College maintains its financial standards in accordance with being accredited by and being a member of the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability.[23]

Williamson College 2016 Commencement Ceremony

Williamson College is a non-denominational Christian college[24] and as such, holds no affiliation to any specific Christian denomination, but is guided by a 12-member board of trustees.[25]

Academics[edit]

Williamson College offers studies in business, leadership, and ministry, and has undergraduate programs for both associate's and bachelor's degrees.[26] The college also has a graduate program for a master's degree[27] in Organizational Leadership.[28] Degrees are offered on campus and online.

Williamson College provides a class model in which each class meets one time per week for five weeks. This model was based on the Adult Learning MBA program at Trevecca Nazarene University, which Dr. Oosting developed[29] before founding Williamson Christian College. These compact and accelerated courses allow both traditional and non-traditional students to earn their degree while still being a part of the workforce.[30] This class model also allows for continuous enrollment, allowing for nine enrollment dates throughout the year.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ABHE Summary of Actions 2013 - WC Name Change" (PDF). ABHE.org. Association for Biblical Higher Education.
  2. ^ "A History and Evaluation of the Revolution Generation Youth Ministries Mentorship Program". ProQuest. ISBN 9780549500957.
  3. ^ "Ph.d Grads Become University Presidents". Regent University.
  4. ^ http://www.williamsonherald.com/features/faith/article_1892a5ce-d71d-11e5-8a24-dfb4044444d7.html
  5. ^ "National Center for Education Statistics - Williamson Christian College". nces.ed.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-02.
  6. ^ "School | College Scorecard". collegescorecard.ed.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-02.
  7. ^ "Williamson College (Accredited Organization Profile) - ECFA.org". ECFA. Retrieved 2016-03-04.
  8. ^ Oosting, Kenneth W. (2009-09-01). The Christian's Guide to Effective Personal Management. Wipf & Stock Publishers. ISBN 9781556351105.
  9. ^ http://wipfandstock.com/author/view/detail/id/11559/
  10. ^ "Williamson College announces municipal/public service scholarship". Williamson Herald. Retrieved 2016-03-01.
  11. ^ Giordano, M. (October 8, 2016). "Williamson Christian College President and Founder to Retire". The Tennessean.
  12. ^ "Higgins joins Williamson Christian College". Williamson Herald. Retrieved 2016-03-11.
  13. ^ "Williamson College Swears In President". The Tennessean. November 2, 2012.
  14. ^ "Huckabee delivers speech to celebrate Williamson Christian College's 10th anniversary". The City Paper. November 6, 2007. Archived from the original on 2016-03-09.
  15. ^ "Mike Huckabee Extols Higher Education". Boston's NPR - wbur. Retrieved 2016-03-03.
  16. ^ "Williamson Christian College Strengthens Ties With Aspen Grove". The Tennessean. September 14, 2012.
  17. ^ "The Promise inmate education program kicks off tonight". The Tennessean. Retrieved 2016-03-01.
  18. ^ "Williamson College dean to speak on jail partnership". The Tennessean. Retrieved 2016-03-01.
  19. ^ "Association for Biblical Higher Education:: Directory". www.abhecoa.org. Retrieved 2016-03-01.
  20. ^ "TRACS Accreditation Meeting April 2008" (PDF). TRACS. Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools.
  21. ^ "Tennessee Higher Education Commission - Authorized Locations" (PDF). tn.gov. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-04-15.
  22. ^ A History and Evaluation of the Revolution Generation Youth Ministries Mentorship Program. ProQuest. 2008-01-01. pp. 84–85. ISBN 9780549500957.
  23. ^ "Williamson Christian College (Accredited Organization Profile) - ECFA.org". ECFA. Retrieved 2016-03-01.
  24. ^ "College Navigator - Williamson Christian College". nces.ed.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-02.
  25. ^ http://www.brentwoodhomepage.com/better-business-bureau-ceo-to-keynote-williamson-college-graduation-cms-26367#.V2eueEbBvcs
  26. ^ "Giving Matters - Williamson College - GuideStar". givingmatters.guidestar.org. Retrieved 2016-03-03.
  27. ^ "Williamson College to Host July 25 Informational Session for Its M.A. in Organizational Development Program - Williamson, Inc". Williamson, Inc. Retrieved 2016-03-09.
  28. ^ "Williamson Christian College - Tuition, Net Price and Cost to Attend". www.collegecalc.org. Retrieved 2016-03-01.
  29. ^ Barnett, William. "The Williamson College Partnership". Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. p. 85.
  30. ^ "Ed Smith named president of Williamson Christian College". Williamson Herald. Retrieved 2016-03-01.

External links[edit]