Thomas Grenville

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Right Honourable
Thomas Grenville
Privy Council of the United Kingdom
Thomas Grenville (1755-1846).jpg
Thomas Grenville (picture)
President of the Board of Control
In office
1806–1806
Monarch George III
Prime Minister William Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville
Preceded by Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
Succeeded by George Tierney
First Lord of the Admiralty
In office
1806–1807
Monarch George III
Prime Minister The Lord Grenville
Preceded by Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey
Succeeded by Henry Phipps, 1st Earl of Mulgrave
Member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire
In office
1779–1784
Preceded by Ralph Verney, 2nd Earl Verney
George Nugent-Temple-Grenville, 1st Marquess of Buckingham
Succeeded by William Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville
Sir John Aubrey, 6th Baronet
Member of Parliament for Aldeburgh
In office
1790–1796
Preceded by William Champion Crespigny
Samuel Salt
Succeeded by Sir John Aubrey, 6th Baronet
Michael Angelo Taylor
Member of Parliament for Buckingham
In office
1796–1801
Preceded by Sir George Nugent, 1st Baronet
Alexander Hood, 1st Viscount Bridport
Succeeded by Parliament of the United Kingdom
In office
1813–1818
Preceded by Parliament of Great Britain
Succeeded by Richard Griffin, 3rd Baron Braybrooke
George Nugent-Grenville, 2nd Baron Nugent
Member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire
In office
1813–1818
Preceded by Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
William Selby Lowndes
Succeeded by William Selby Lowndes
Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
British Minister to France
In office
1782–1782
Preceded by Vacant due to American Revolutionary War Title last held by David Murray, 2nd Earl of Mansfield
Succeeded by Alleyne FitzHerbert, 1st Baron St Helens
Justice in Eyre south of the Trent
In office
1800–1846
Preceded by Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney
Succeeded by Office abolished
Personal details
Born (1755-12-31)31 December 1755
Wotton Underwood, Buckinghamshire, England
Died 17 December 1846(1846-12-17) (aged 90)
Piccadilly, London, England
Nationality British
Political party Whig
Parents George Grenville
Alma mater Eton College
Thomas Grenville by Giovanni Battista Comolli, British Library, London

Thomas Grenville PC (31 December 1755 – 17 December 1846) was a British politician and bibliophile.

Background and education[edit]

Grenville was the second son of Prime Minister George Grenville and Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Wyndham, 3rd Baronet. George Nugent-Temple-Grenville, 1st Marquess of Buckingham, was his elder brother and William Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville, his younger brother. He was educated at Eton.

Career[edit]

In 1778, he was commissioned ensign in the Coldstream Guards and in 1779 promoted a lieutenant in the 80th Regiment of Foot, but resigned his commission in 1780. He was, with one interval, a member of parliament from 1780 to 1810, and for a few months during 1806 and 1807 President of the Board of Control (1806) and then First Lord of the Admiralty (1806–1807). In 1798, he was sworn of the Privy Council.

On 1 February 1799 Grenville and a party were travelling on HMS Proserpine when she was wrecked near Scharhörn off the Elbe. She was trying to deliver Grenville and his party to Cuxhaven, from where they were to proceed on a diplomatic mission to meet Frederick William III of Prussia in Berlin during the War of the Second Coalition. Proserpine was stuck in ice in worsening weather. At 1:30, on 2 February, all 187 persons on Prosperine left her and started the six-mile walk to the island Neuwerk, in freezing weather and falling snow. Seven seamen, a boy, four Royal Marines, and one woman and her child died; the rest made it to safety in the tower of Neuwerk. The diplomatic party reached Cuxhaven on 6 February to continue to Berlin via Hamburg and return to London on 23 March.[1][2]

Library[edit]

He began collecting books from at least his early twenties, and by his death had amassed 20,240 volumes containing 16,000 titles, the collection is notable for its many editions of Homer, Aesop and Ariosto, for early travel books, and for literature in the Romance languages. Rare volumes include a vellum copy of the Gutenberg Bible, which Grenville bought in France in 1817 for 6260 francs, a Mainz Psalter and a Shakespeare First Folio. There are also 59 manuscripts. Grenville liked his books to be in excellent condition, and would often have books washed or rebound, as well as seeking out relevant pages to add to any incomplete copies he owned, he lent books widely, Barry Taylor describing his library as apparently "semi-public". He bequeathed the collection to the British Museum, of which he had become a trustee in 1830, and it is now housed in the King's Library Tower in the British Library.[3][4][5]

Personal life[edit]

Thomas Grenville

Grenville died at Piccadilly, London, in December 1846, aged 90, he never married.

Styles from birth to death[edit]

  • Mr. Thomas Grenville (1755–1779)
  • Mr. Thomas Grenville, MP (1779–1784)
  • Mr. Thomas Grenville (1784–1790)
  • Mr. Thomas Grenville, MP (1790–1798)
  • The Rt. Hon. Thomas Grenville, MP (1798–1810)
  • The Rt. Hon. Thomas Grenville (1810–1813)
  • The Rt. Hon. Thomas Grenville, MP (1813–1818)
  • The Rt. Hon. Thomas Grenville (1818–1846)

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Hepper (1994), p.90.
  2. ^ Dr. F. Voigt, „Aus dem Fremdenbuche vom Thurm zu Neuwerk“, Mitteilungen des Vereins für Hamburgische Geschichte Band 10 (1888) S. 127, Verein für Hamburgische Geschichte
  3. ^ Taylor, Barry (2009). "Thomas Grenville (1755–1846) and His Books". In Mandelbrote, Giles; Taylor, Barry. Libraries within the Library: the Origins of the British Library's Printed Collections. British Library. pp. 321–340. ISBN 978-0-7123-5035-8. 
  4. ^ British Library, Named collections of printed materials (G) accessed 22 December 2011
  5. ^ British Library, The copy on vellum – provenance accessed 22 December 2011

References[edit]

  • British Historical Facts 1760–1830, by Chris Cook and John Stevenson (The Macmillan Press 1980)
  • Hepper, David J. (1994). British Warship Losses in the Age of Sail, 1650–1859. Rotherfield: Jean Boudriot. ISBN 0-948864-30-3. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Payne, J.T., Foss, H. and Rye, W.B. Bibliotheca Grenvilliana. London, 1842–72. Catalogue of Thomas Grenville's library. Copies held by many major scholarly libraries.

External links[edit]

Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
The Earl Verney
George Grenville
Member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire
1779–1784
With: The Earl Verney
Succeeded by
Sir John Aubrey, 6th Bt
William Grenville
Preceded by
William Champion Crespigny
Samuel Salt
Member of Parliament for Aldeburgh
17901796
With: Lord Grey of Groby
Succeeded by
Sir John Aubrey, 6th Bt
Michael Angelo Taylor
Preceded by
George Nugent
The Lord Bridport
Member of Parliament for Buckingham
17961801
With: George Nugent
Succeeded by
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Member of Parliament for Buckingham
1801–1810
With: George Nugent 1801–1802
Lord William Proby 1802–1804
Lord Carysfort 1805–1806
Earl Percy 1806
Sir William Young, 2nd Bt 1806–1807
Sir John Borlase Warren, 1st Bt 1807
Richard Griffin 1807–1810
Succeeded by
Richard Griffin
Lord George Grenville
Preceded by
Earl Temple
William Selby Lowndes
Member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire
1813–1818
With: William Selby Lowndes
Succeeded by
William Selby Lowndes
Earl Temple
Diplomatic posts
Vacant
Title last held by
The Viscount Stormont
British Minister to France
1782
Succeeded by
Alleyne Fitzherbert
Political offices
Preceded by
The Lord Minto
President of the Board of Control
1806
Succeeded by
George Tierney
Preceded by
Viscount Howick
First Lord of the Admiralty
1806–1807
Succeeded by
The Lord Mulgrave
Legal offices
Preceded by
The Viscount Sydney
Justice in Eyre
south of the Trent

1800–1846
Succeeded by
Office Abolished