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Óengus of Tallaght

Óengus mac Óengobann, better known as Saint Óengus of Tallaght or Óengus the Culdee, was an Irish bishop and writer, who flourished in the first quarter of the 9th century and is held to be the author of the Félire Óengusso and the Martyrology of Tallaght. Little of Óengus's life and career is reliably attested; the most important sources include internal evidence from the Félire, a Middle Irish preface to that work, a biographic poem beginning Aíbind suide sund amne and the entry for his feast-day inserted into the Martyrology of Tallaght. He was known as a son of Óengoba and grandson of Oíblén, mentioned in a genealogy as belonging to the Dál nAraidi, a ruling kindred in the north-east of Ireland. A late account prefaced to the Martyrology asserts that Óengus was born in Clúain Édnech or Eidnech, not far from the present town of Mountrath, brought up at the monastic school founded there by St Fintan, where his body was buried; the claim may be spurious, since the Félire itself accords no such importance to the monastic foundation or its patron saint St Fintan.

It is sufficiently clear that Óengus became a cleric, since he describes himself as such in the Félire using the more humble appellation of "pauper". He was an important member of the community founded by St. Máel Ruain at Tallaght, in the borderlands of Leinster. Máel Ruain is described as his mentor. There are reasons for believing that Óengus was ordained to the office of bishop, a denomination, first assigned to him in a list of saints inserted into the Martyrology of Tallaght. If so, his influence may well have extended to the reformed communities which were associated with Tallaght, many of which were founded in Óengus's lifetime. In fact, two such monasteries in Co. Limerick and Co. Laois, both of them known as Dísert Óengusa, bear his memory in name; the literary effort most attributed to Óengus is the Old Irish work known as Félire Óengusso, the earliest metrical martyrology — a register of saints and their feast days – to have been written in the vernacular. The work survives in at least ten manuscripts, the earliest being Leabhar Breac of the early 15th century.

The martyrology proper consists of 365 quatrains, one for each day of the year, is framed between a lengthy prologue and epilogue. Scribes added a prose preface, including material on Óengus, accompanied the text with abundant glosses and scholia. Óengus's principal source was the Martyrology of Tallaght, an abbreviated version in prose of the Martyrologium Hieronymianum, but with a multitude of Irish saints added to their respective feastdays. Other sources are given in the epilogue as an "antigraph of Jerome, the martyrology of Eusebius" and "Ireland's host of books." The precise date of the original composition has proved difficult to ascertain. The usual method of determining a terminus post quem has been to argue from the careers of saints and kings referred to in the text, many of whom remain obscure; the terminus ante quem is a different game. In view of the selective nature of the Félire, arguments from silence have little to recommend it, at least in individual cases. What would have been instructive, the year of Óengus's death, is unknown, but his education by Máel Ruain must at least mean that he did not outlive the 9th century.

The one thing, accepted is that it was written no earlier than 797, when one of the rulers described in the prologue as having deceased, Donnchad mac Domnaill, king of Tara, died. Rudolf Thurneysen postulated a date before 808 on grounds that the reference to the death of Bran Ardchenn mac Muiredaig, king of Leinster, should be attributed to political sympathies in the reign of his successor Fínsnechta mac Cellaig.Ó Riain, has rejected the traditional date in favour of a range, between 828 and 833, while more Dumville has cast doubt on Ó Riain's conclusions and dating methods. First, Ó Riain argues that such sympathies as Thurneysen refers to are pertinent only to the next kings in the royal line, Cellach mac Brain and Conchobar mac Donnchada, sons of Bran and Donnchad respectively. Dumville objects that this political argument glosses over the probability that while Bran and Donnchad gave way to overlords from rival dynasties, they were succeeded by members of their family in their own tuatha or mórthuatha.

The inclusion of these kings in the prologue therefore offers no good reason to move up the terminus ante quem. Second, Ó Riain sees reason to identify the saints Airerán, Modímóc and Flann with Airfhinnán, abbot of Tallaght, Dímmán of Araid and Flann mac Fairchellaig, abbot of Lismore. Dumville, points out a number of weaknesses and concludes with Stokes "that no saint or other person who died in the ninth century is mentioned." Third, having identified a number of saints in the Martyrology of Tallaght, the primary model for the Félire, he proposes obits extending to that of St Teimnén or St Temnán of Linn Duachaill, who died in 828. In Dumville's view, the evidence is ambiguous, since the relationship of the extant copies of the Martyrology of Tallaght to the lost original which served as the source for the Félire is yet unclear. Liam Breatnach has supported Thurneysen's date. Something of Óengus' view on secular politics appears to come through in his prologue to the Félire. In a number of stanzas, the deserted sites of Tara, Crúachan and Emain Machae are interpreted as the former s

Jeisyville, Illinois

Jeisyville is a small village in Christian County, United States. The population was 107 at the 2010 census. Jeisyville is located at 39°34′35″N 89°24′27″W. According to the 2010 census, Jeisyville has a total area of all land; as of the census of 2000, there were 128 people, 49 households, 36 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,205.5 people per square mile. There were 52 housing units at an average density of 896.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the village was 0.78 % African American. There were 49 households out of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.3% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 26.5% were non-families. 20.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.11. In the village, the population was spread out with 21.1% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to 64, 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.0 males. The median income for a household in the village was $33,750, the median income for a family was $37,083. Males had a median income of $36,250 versus $25,000 for females; the per capita income for the village was $16,947. There were no families and 4.4% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 8.7% of those over 64

St John the Evangelist's Church

St John the Evangelist's Church may refer to: St John the Evangelist's Church, Abram, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Alvanley, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Ashton Hayes, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Blackheath, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Burgess Hill, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Byley, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Cadeby, a redundant Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Cambridge, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Carlton in Lindrick, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Chelford, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Chichester, a redundant Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Clifton, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Corby Glen, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Cowgill, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Crawshawbooth, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Crosscanonby, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Farnworth, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Greenock, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Gressingham, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Kingsley, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Kirkdale, an active Roman Catholic church St John the Evangelist's Church, Kirkham, an active Roman Catholic church St John the Evangelist's Church, Lancaster, a redundant Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Leeds, a redundant Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Mold, a redundant Welsh church St John the Evangelist's Church, Newton Arlosh, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Norley, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Osmotherley, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Otterburn, a church built in 1857 by three sisters St John the Evangelist's Church, Penge, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Preston Village, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Sandbach Heath, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Sandiway, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, St Leonards-on-Sea, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Toft, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Turncroft, a demolished Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Warrington, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Weston, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Winsford, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Woodland, an active Anglican church St John the Evangelist's Church, Worsthorne, an active Anglican church St. John the Evangelist's Church, an active Roman Catholic church St. John the Evangelist's Church, an active Roman Catholic church St. John the Evangelist Church

Trap (Henry Lau EP)

Trap is the debut solo EP of Chinese-Canadian artist and Super Junior-M member Henry. It was released on June 7, 2013, by S. M. Entertainment in South Korea; the tracks "Trap" and "1-4-3" were chosen as the lead singles for the promotional cycle. A video teaser for the title track of Henry Lau's debut EP, "Trap", was released on May 31, followed by a highlight medley video of the tracks included in his first mini-album; the title track and EP's lead single was composed and arranged by a group of European music producers including Svante Halldin, Emilh Tigerlantz and Geraldo Sandell. The lyrics were penned by Misfit who has contributed to many other songs of various SM Town artists; the piano instrumental was performed by Henry himself. The accompanying choreography was put together by Shaun Evaristo, who has worked on many other songs with other artists of SM Town, including BoA for "Not Over U", Super Junior for "From U" and Super Junior-M for "Go"; the EP's second promotional single was "1-4-3".

In the song, 1-4-3 represents the breakdown of how many letters it takes to write "I love you". Using this specific number sequence became popular in the 1990s with the advent of pagers; the song mentions the number sequence of 4-8-6, which represents the breakdown of how many strokes it takes to write 사랑해 in Hangul. The album was released in South Korea on June 7, 2013, along with the music video of "Trap". An English version of "Trap" was released as a part of the digital single "1-4-3" on August 23, 2013; the Taiwan edition of Trap was released on July 5 in Taiwan. The album is the same as the Korean edition except a raffle ticket is included inside for Henry's Taiwanese promotions; the Chinese version of Trap was released on August 14 and it includes a Chinese version of "Trap" and "1-4-3." Both versions of "Trap" were be included in this album. The music video of the song featured fellow labelmates Lee Taemin; the video starts with Henry playing the grand piano and after whispering "I'm trapped" as he joins the background dancers in a B-boy styled choreography.

The video ends with Henry playing the piano once again. A Chinese version of the music video was released on August 13. Henry promoted the album on many music shows, including Music Bank, Arirang Simply K-Pop, his first overseas performance was at the Hong Kong Dome Concert on July 2013 in Hong Kong. A short performance of the Chinese version of "Trap" was filmed and shown on Hong Kong's TVB program, Jade Solid Gold, he was the presenter for an award on this program. Henry started overseas promotions in August, starting with Bangkok and Taipei, Taiwan for his album launch, he stayed in Taiwan for seven days to attend several TV programs as a radio show. He held a fan signing event with over 3000 fans in attendance, he attended Super Junior's Super Show 5 in Taipei that same week as a member of Super Junior-M. On August 14, 2013, SM Entertainment announced that Lau would have follow-up promotions for a re-release of his song "1-4-3" as a digital single featuring his label mate, Amber Liu of f; the single was released on August 23.

Credits adapted from the official homepage. The song "Trap" peaked at number 28 on the Gaon Digital Chart and number 18 on the Billboard Korea K-Pop Hot 100 Weekly singles. "1-4-3" reached number 35 on the Gaon chart. Henry Official Website

Hans Fischer

Hans Fischer was a German organic chemist and the recipient of the 1930 Nobel Prize for Chemistry "for his researches into the constitution of haemin and chlorophyll and for his synthesis of haemin." Fischer was born in Höchst on Main, now a city district of Frankfurt. His parents were Dr. Eugen Fischer, Director of the firm of Kalle & Co, Privatdozent at the Technical High School and Anna Herdegen, he went to a primary school in Stuttgart, to the "Humanistisches Gymnasium" in Wiesbaden, matriculating in 1899. He read chemistry and medicine, first at the University of Lausanne and at Marburg, he graduated in 1904, in 1908 he qualified for his M. D.. He worked first at a Medical Clinic in Munich and at the First Berlin Chemical Institute under Emil Fischer, he qualified as lecturer on internal medicine one year later. In 1913 he became a lecturer in physiology at the Physiological Institute in Munich. In 1916 he became Professor of Medical Chemistry at the University of Innsbruck and from there he went to the University of Vienna in 1918.

From 1921 until his death he held the position of Professor of Organic Chemistry at the Technical University of Munich. Fischer's scientific work was concerned with the investigation of the pigments in blood and chlorophyll in leaves, as well as with the chemistry of pyrrole from which these pigments are derived. Of special importance was his synthesis of bilirubin and haemin, he received many honours for this work, received the Nobel Prize in 1930. The lunar crater Fischer was named after him in 1976. Fischer married Wiltrud Haufe in 1935, he committed suicide in Munich in despair over the destruction of his institute and his work during the last days of World War II. Fellow of the Academy of Sciences Leopoldina Privy Councillor Liebig Memorial Medal Nobel Prize for Chemistry Honorary doctorate, Harvard University Davy Medal of the Royal Society of London Heinrich Wieland, "Hans Fischer und Otto Hönigschmid zum Gedächtniss", Angewandte Chemie, 62: 1–4, doi:10.1002/ange.19500620102. Bickel, M H,"", 58, pp. 215 -- 9, PMID 11810971 Stern, A J, "Hans Fischer", Ann.

N. Y. Acad. Sci. 206, pp. 752–61, Bibcode:1973NYASA.206..752S, doi:10.1111/j.1749-6632.1973.tb43252.x, PMID 4584221 Watson, C J, "Reminiscences of Hans Fischer and his laboratory", Perspect. Biol. Med. 8, pp. 419–35, doi:10.1353/pbm.1965.0052, PMID 5323649 Kämmerer, H, "Hans Fischer. A reminiscence on the 80th anniversary of his birth", Münchener Medizinische Wochenschrift, 103, pp. 2164–6, PMID 14036988 Newspaper clippings about Hans Fischer in the 20th Century Press Archives of the ZBW

McDiarmid Falls

McDiarmid Falls is a waterfall on Grouse Creek in Wells Gray Provincial Park, east-central British Columbia, Canada. It is located 100 m downstream from Moul Falls and 150 m upstream from Grouse Creek's confluence with the Clearwater River. Grouse Creek rises from snowmelt, a lake and springs at a pass between Trophy Mountain and Table Mountain, it flows 18 km west before tumbling over McDiarmid Falls. The creek drops a total of 150 m in its last 1 km as it has eroded into the escarpment of a volcanic plateau. McDiarmid Falls was named in 2000 and refers to Garfield and Cecile McDiarmid, a pioneer family of the Clearwater Valley, they purchased 160 acres of land just south of Grouse Creek. In 1956 they purchased a separate property of 70 acres beside the Clearwater River and adjacent to both Moul Falls and McDiarmid Falls. Both waterfalls are just inside the expanded 1997 boundaries of Wells Gray Park. In the late 1940s, the McDiarmids established several cabins along the Clearwater River and their guiding business attracted many guests to the fabulous river fishing.

In 1950, the McDiarmids started construction of Trophies Lodge which opened for business in 1953. Their guests stayed a night at Trophies Lodge were taken by horse down to the Clearwater River to stay in one of the fishing cabins for a week or longer; the McDiarmids prepared and served gourmet meals in this remote area and provided nightly entertainment because Cecile was a trained opera singer. Some of their guests were renowned, including H. R. MacMillan, president of the forest company MacMillan Bloedel; when a logging road was built along the Clearwater River in 1965, the fishing was destroyed within a few years. By 1973 the fishing cabins had been abandoned and the McDiarmids closed Trophies Lodge as a business, but continued to live in the large log building. Cecile died in 1986. Mac lived alone in his lodge until 1995 and died at the age of 92 in 1998. Grouse Creek is the fourth name for the stream. No other Wells Gray Park place name has been changed more times. Surveyor Robert Lee referred to it as Beaver Creek on his maps drawn in 1912 to 1914.

After the area was settled, the stream became known as Grouse Creek because of the profusion of blue grouse that inhabited these forests. The waterfall and creek were called Moul starting in the 1930s, referring to George William Moul, a nearby homesteader from 1915 to 1918. In the 1980s, locals reverted to using the Grouse Creek name though "Moul Creek" appeared on all the maps; the Ministry of Highways erected a "Grouse Creek" sign on the Clearwater Valley Road bridge in 1990 which confused travellers more. The following year, the Friends of Wells Gray Park requested a ruling from the Geographical Names Office in Victoria. After an investigation of local and historical usage, a decision was announced in favour of Grouse Creek. Moul Falls remained unchanged; the trail to Moul Falls starts at a well-signed parking lot on Clearwater Valley Road. A foot bridge crosses Grouse Creek above Moul Falls and the trail continues downhill to McDiarmid Falls and the Clearwater River. In winters that are cold and snowy, McDiarmid Falls freezes from top to bottom.

The best access is using snowshoes. List of waterfalls