1789 in the United States

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Events from the year 1789 in the United States, the Articles of Confederation, the agreement under which the nation's government had been operating since 1781, was superseded by the Constitution in March of this year.

Incumbents[edit]

Federal Government[edit]

Events[edit]

January–March[edit]

April–June[edit]

April 30: George Washington becomes the first U.S. President

July–September[edit]

October–December[edit]

Undated[edit]

Ongoing[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

  • January 4 – Thomas Nelson Jr., signatory of the Declaration of Independence and Governor of Virginia in 1781 (born 1738)
  • January 10 – James Mitchell Varnum, brigadier general of the Revolutionary War, Continental Congressman for Rhode Island (born 1748)
  • January 13 – Joseph Spencer, major general of the Revolutionary War, Continental Congressman for Connecticut (born 1714)
  • January 25 – James Randolph Reid, Continental Congressman for Connecticut (born 1750)
  • February 12 – Ethan Allen, Revolutionary War patriot (born 1738)
  • February 19 – Nicholas Van Dyke, lawyer and President of Delaware (born 1738)
  • March 29 – Thomas Collins, planter and President of Delaware (born 1732)
  • April 13 – Joseph Spencer, colonel of the Revolutionary War, Continental Congressman for New Hampshire (born 1739)
  • July 21 – Joseph Spencer, Continental Congressman for Maryland (c. 1750)
  • September 4 – Paul Spooner, lieutenant governor of Vermont from 1782 to 1787 (born 1746)
  • September 23
  • October 27 – John Cook, farmer, President of Delaware (born 1730)
  • November 10 – Richard Caswell, major general of the Revolutionary War, Continental Congressman and Governor of North Carolina from 1776 to 1780 & 1785 to 1787) (born 1729)
  • November 17 – Samuel Holden Parsons, major general of the Revolutionary War, member of the Connecticut House of Representatives (born 1737)
  • December 10 – William Pierce, member of the Georgia House of Representatives, Continental Congressman for Georgia (born 1753)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ King, Steve (2011-01-21). "Brown's Power of Sympathy". Daybook. Archived from the original on 2012-03-10. Retrieved 2012-03-07. 
  2. ^ "US History Timeline: 1700–1800". faculty.washington.edu. 
  3. ^ "The First Supreme Court". History.com. Archived from the original on 2009-05-01. Retrieved 2008-09-24. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Little, Charles E. (1900). "America: 1789". Cyclopedia of Classified Dates. New York: Funk & Wagnalls. 

External links[edit]