1899 in Italy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Years in Italy: 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902
Centuries: 18th century · 19th century · 20th century
Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s
Years: 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902

See also: 1898 in Italy, other events of 1899, 1900 in Italy.


Events from the year 1899 in Italy.

Kingdom of Italy[edit]

Events[edit]

The year is marked by the fight over a new coercive Public Safety bill introduced by Prime Minister Luigi Pelloux after the Bava Beccaris massacre in May 1898 in Milan. The Radicals and Socialist start an obstructionist campaign.

February[edit]

Prime Minister Luigi Pelloux
  • February 4 – A new coercive Public Safety bill is introduced by the government of Luigi Pelloux and adopted by Parliament. The law made strikes by state employees illegal; gave the executive wider powers to ban public meetings and dissolve subversive organisations; revived the penalties of banishment; and preventive arrest for political offences, and; tightened control of the press by making authors responsible for their articles and declaring incitement to violence a crime.[1] The Radicals and Socialist start an obstructionist campaign using the filibuster: points of order, endless speeches and other procedural delaying tactics.[2]

May[edit]

  • May 14 – Prime Minister Pelloux resigns over his Chinese policy but forms a new government, the most decisively conservative since 1876.[1]

June[edit]

  • June 22 – Pelloux's patience with the obstruction to his public safety provisions snaps and he issues an unconstitutional royal decree. More moderate politicians like Giuseppe Zanardelli and Giovanni Giolitti join the opposition.[2]

July[edit]

  • July 11 – The automobile manufacturer Fiat is established in Turin by a group of investors including Giovanni Agnelli. The company would become the major car making industry of Italy. The first Fiat plant opened in 1900 with 35 staff making 24 cars.

Sports[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Seton-Watson, Italy from liberalism to fascism, 1870–1925, p. 193
  2. ^ a b Clark, Modern Italy, p. 141
  3. ^ "History". acmilan.com. Associazione Calcio Milan. Archived from the original on 7 October 2010. Retrieved 4 October 2010. 
  4. ^ Neil Heath (17 November 2009). "AC Milan's Nottingham-born hero". bbc.co.uk. British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 4 October 2010.