1903 Vanderbilt Commodores football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
1903 Vanderbilt Commodores football
1903Vandy.jpg
Conference Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
1903 record 6–1–1 (5–1–1 SIAA)
Head coach James H. Henry (1st season)
Captain Frank Kyle
Home stadium Dudley Field
Seasons
← 1902
1904 →
1903 SIAA football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Clemson + 2 0 1     4 1 1
Cumberland + 4 1 1     6 1 1
Sewanee 5 1 0     7 1 0
Vanderbilt 5 1 1     6 1 1
Mississippi A&M 2 0 2     3 0 2
Georgia 3 2 0     3 4 0
Ole Miss 1 1 1     2 1 1
Texas 0 0 1     5 1 2
Kentucky State 0 0 0     7 1 0
Alabama 3 4 0     3 4 0
Auburn 2 3 0     4 3 0
Tennessee 2 4 0     4 5 0
Georgia Tech 1 4 0     3 5 0
Tulane 0 1 1     2 2 1
Mercer 0 1 0     0 1 0
Nashville 0 2 0     2 2 0
LSU 0 5 0     4 5 0
SW Presbyterian            
  • + – Conference co-champions

The 1903 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University during the 1903 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. J. H. Henry, not Neil Snow, coached Vanderbilt for one season in 1903. His squad finished the season with a 6–1–1 record. The season was marred only by the upset loss to Cumberland. John J. Tigert and Bob Blake were both Rhodes Scholars.

Before the season[edit]

After the last game of the 1902 year, Walter H. Watkins announced his resignation of his position as head coach of the Vanderbilt football and baseball teams in order that he devote attention to the study of law exclusively. Vanderbilt made an effort to secure the services of coach Neil Snow, who was the University of Nashville (Peabody) coach.[1][n 1]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result
October 3 Cumberland Dudley FieldNashville, Tennessee L 0–6  
October 10 Alabama Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee W 30–0  
October 17 Tennessee Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee (Rivalry) W 40–0  
October 24 at Ole Miss Hollingsworth Field • Oxford, Mississippi (Rivalry) W 33–0  
October 31 at Georgia Herty FieldAthens GA (Rivalry) W 33–0  
November 7 at Texas Clark FieldAustin TX T 5–5  
November 14 Washington (MO)* Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee W 41–0  
November 21 Sewanee Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee (Rivalry) W 10–5  
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. All times are in Central Time.

[3]

Season summary[edit]

Cumberland[edit]

Cumberland at Vanderbilt
1 2Total
Cumberland 6 0 6
Vanderbilt 0 0 0

Cumberland upset the Commodores 6–0, the first time Cumberland ever scored on Vanderbilt. Four minutes after the game started, Waterhouse had the decisive touchdown. M. O. Bridges had his right collarbone broken.[4]

The starting lineup was B. Blake (left end), Pritchard (left tackle), Brown (left guard), Perry (center), Patterson (right guard), Graham (right tackle), Bryan (right end), Kyle (quarterback), D. Blake (left halfback), Hamilton (right halfback), Tigert (fullback).[4]

Alabama[edit]

Vanderbilt, outweighing Alabama 15 pounds to the man, beat Alabama 30–0, in the first all-time meeting between the schools at Dudley Field.[5] Frank Kyle starred with runs of 35, 30, 50, and 48 yards.[6]

Vanderbilt took a 12–0 halftime lead after first half touchdowns were scored first by Ed Hamilton and followed by John J. Tigert.[7] The Commodores then closed the game with three touchdowns in the second half scored by Hamilton, Dan Blake and Bob Blake for the 30–0 victory.[7] Tigert converted all five PAT's in their victory.[6]

The starting lineup was B. Blake (left end), Graham (left tackle), Brown (left guard), Perry (center), Patterson (right guard), Pritchard (right tackle), G. Jones (right end), Howell (quarterback), Kyle (left halfback), Hamilton (right halfback), Tigert (fullback).[6]

Tennessee[edit]

Jones and John J. Tigert starred as the Tennessee Volunteers were beaten 40–0.[8]

The starting lineup was B. Blake (left end), Pritchard (left tackle), B. Brown (left guard), Perry (center), Patterson (right guard), Graham (right tackle), D. Blake (right end), Kyle (quarterback), Tigert (left halfback), Jones (right halfback), Hamilton (fullback).[8]

Mississippi[edit]

In Mississippi, the Commodores beat Ole Miss 33–0.

Georgia[edit]

The Georgia Bulldogs could not check Vanderbilt's end runs and were easily beaten 33–0.[9]

Texas[edit]

Vanderbilt tied the Texas Longhorns 5–5.

Washington U[edit]

The Washington University Bears were beaten 41–0.

Sewanee[edit]

Sewanee at Vanderbilt
1 2Total
Sewanee 0 5 5
Vanderbilt 5 5 10

Vanderbilt gave rival Sewanee its only loss, 10–5, the first team to even score on the Tigers. Sewanee was crippled in the first half by the loss of Stewart, who fractured his ankle in a scrimmage before the game. He tried to play through it, but had to be helped off the field.[10] John J. Tigert, later a prominent educator, got Vanderbilt's first touchdown.[10] Sewanee tied the score with a touchdown in the second half. Later, Vanderbilt had the ball at the 4-yard line third down. "As great a stand of a football elevve was that of Sewaee before Vanderbilt's winning touchdown was made."[10] On third down from the 1-yard line the center Perry fell on a fumble. Sewanee protested that the runner was down, but Vanderbilt was awarded the touchdown.[10] "Vanderbilt, in fact all Nashville, is wild with joy tonight. Sewanee is looking forward to next Thanksgiving."[10]

The starting lineup was B. Blake (left end), Pritchard (left tackle), Brown (left guard), Perry (center), Patterson (right guard), Graham (right tackle), D. Blake (right end), Kyle (quarterback), Tigert (left halfback), Bryan (right halfback), Hamilton (fullback)[10]

Postseason[edit]

1903 met difficulty in determining an SIAA champion. Clemson had the best record, but lost to an inferior North Carolina team; and in the game to secure the SIAA title were tied by Cumberland. Clemson's John Heisman pushed strongly for Cumberland to share the SIAA title.[11] Cumberland's strongest victory was its win over Vanderbilt. However, Sewanee beat Cumberland, yet suffered its only loss to Vanderbilt.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Snow resigned from Nashville never to coach again, accepting a construction position in New York.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.vucommodores.com/sports/historycorner/spec-rel/112812aae.html
  2. ^ "Neil Snow Has Given Up Coaching". Detroit Free Press. December 4, 1902. p. 9. Retrieved May 8, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ http://vucommodores.cstv.com/sports/m-footbl/history.html
  4. ^ a b "Cumberland Wins". The Tennessean. October 4, 1903. p. 7. Retrieved May 8, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ "Alabama vs Vanderbilt". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved November 19, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-05-08. Retrieved 2016-05-05. 
  7. ^ a b "U. of A. is outclassed". The Montgomery Advertiser. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 10, 1903. p. 12. 
  8. ^ a b "Picking Cherries". The Tennessean. October 18, 1903. p. 7. Retrieved August 2, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  9. ^ "Vanderbilt Easily Beats Georgia". The Courier-Journal. November 1, 1903. p. 26. Retrieved August 2, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  10. ^ a b c d e f "Commodores Win From Old Rivals". Atlanta Constitution. November 27, 1903. p. 1. Retrieved May 16, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  11. ^ Langum, David J. From Maverick to Mainstream: Cumberland School of Law, 1847-1997. p. 95. 

Bibliography[edit]

Vanderbilt University. Vanderbilt University Quarterly. 4.