1919 in New Zealand

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1919 in New Zealand

Decades:
See also:

The following lists events that happened during 1919 in New Zealand.

Incumbents[edit]

Regal and viceregal[edit]

Government[edit]

The 19th New Zealand Parliament concludes. The election held in November sees the Reform Party returned with an increased majority (47 of the 80 seats). Women are eligible to stand for Parliament for the first time.[2]

Parliamentary opposition[edit]

Main centre leaders[edit]

Events[edit]

Arts and literature[edit]

See 1919 in art, 1919 in literature, Category:1919 books

Music[edit]

See: 1919 in music

Film[edit]

See: Category:1919 film awards, 1919 in film, List of New Zealand feature films, Cinema of New Zealand, Category:1919 films

Sport[edit]

Chess[edit]

  • The National Chess championship was not held (the influenza epidemic was still subsiding at its traditional new year dates).

Cricket[edit]

Golf[edit]

  • The ninth New Zealand Open championship was won by Ted Douglas after a playoff against Sloan Morpeth (his third victory).[11]
  • The 23rd National Amateur Championships were held in Napier [12]
    • Men: H.E. Crosse (Napier) - 2nd title
    • Women: Miss N.E. Wright

Horse racing[edit]

Harness racing[edit]

Lawn bowls[edit]

The national outdoor lawn bowls championships are held in Auckland.[15]

  • Men's singles champion – M. Walker (Ponsonby Bowling Club)
  • Men's pair champions – J.B. Rosmon, W.J. Hueston (skip) (Gisborne Bowling Club)
  • Men's fours champions – A.J. Andrew, W. Given, O. Gallagher, Ernie Jury (skip) (Karangahake Bowling Club)

Rugby union[edit]

  • Wellington successfully defended the Ranfurly Shield against six challengers; Canterbury (21-8), Taranaki (18-10), Canterbury (in Christchurch)(23-9), Auckland (24-3), and Wanganui (30-3).[16]

Soccer[edit]

Provincial league champions:[17]

  • Auckland: North Shore
  • Canterbury: Linwood, Excelsior (shared)
  • Hawke's Bay: Waipukurau
  • Otago: Northern
  • Southland: No competition
  • Wanganui: Eastbrooke
  • Wellington: YMCA

Rugby league[edit]

Births[edit]

January–February[edit]

March–April[edit]

May–June[edit]

July–August[edit]

September–October[edit]

November–December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January–March[edit]

  • 21 January – Thomas Thompson, politician (born 1832)
  • 22 January – Carrick Paul, World War I flying ace (born 1893)
  • 2 February – Charles Begg, surgeon, army health administrator (born 1879)
  • 7 February – Donald Reid, farmer, landowner, businessman, politician (born 1833)
  • 13 February – William Temple, soldier, Victoria Cross recipient (born 1833)
  • 18 February – Searby Buxton, politician (born 1832)
  • 19 February – William Tucker, soldier, farmer, politician, mayor of Gisborne (1887–88) (born 1843)
  • 24 February – Alfred Fraser, politician (born 1862)
  • 18 March – Isabella Siteman, farmer, philanthropist (born c.1842)
  • 25 March – Harry Burnand, engineer, sawmiller (born 1850)

April–June[edit]

July–September[edit]

October–December[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Statistics New Zealand: New Zealand Official Yearbook, 1990. ISSN 0078-0170 page 52
  2. ^ New Zealand Parliament - Parliament timeline
  3. ^ "Elections NZ - Leaders of the Opposition". Archived from the original on 17 October 2008. Retrieved 6 April 2008.
  4. ^ a b Dictionary of New Zealand Biography: George Bruce Bolt
  5. ^ Auckland Airport: Biography of George B. Bolt
  6. ^ a b c Rendel, David (1975) Civil Aviation in New Zealand: An Illustrated History. Wellington. A.H. & A.W.Reed. ISBN 0-589-00905-2
  7. ^ Christchurch City Libraries: Upper Riccarton Cemetery
  8. ^ Te ARa Encyclopedia of New Zealand: Accidents and the development of aviation
  9. ^ Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand: Early flying feats
  10. ^ Cricketarchive
  11. ^ "PGA European - Holden New Zealand Open". The Sports Network. 2005. Retrieved 25 March 2009.
  12. ^ McLintock, A. H., ed. (1966). "Men's Golf - National Champions". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 13 February 2009.
  13. ^ "List of NZ Trotting cup winners". Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 7 May 2009.
  14. ^ Auckland Trotting cup at hrnz.co.nz Archived 17 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine.
  15. ^ McLintock, A.H., ed. (1966). "Bowls, men's outdoor—tournament winners". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  16. ^ Palenski, R. and Lambert, M. The New Zealand Almanac, 1982. Moa Almanac Press. ISBN 0-908570-55-4
  17. ^ "New Zealand: List of champions". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 1999.

External links[edit]

Media related to 1919 in New Zealand at Wikimedia Commons