1929 in paleontology

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List of years in paleontology
In science
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932

Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils.[1] This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 1929.

Arthropoda[edit]

Newly named crustacean taxa[edit]

Name Status Authors Notes Images

Cycloprosopon

  • Lorenthey
  • Beurlen

Newly named insect taxa[edit]

Name Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Permotipula[2]

Valid
  • Tillyard
Late Permian Newcastle Coal Measures, between Belmont and Warners Bay, New South Wales  Australia Possibly the oldest known dipteran

Archosauromorphs[edit]

  • Barosaurus gastroliths documented.[3]

Newly named dinosaurs[edit]

Data courtesy of George Olshevsky's dinosaur genera list.[4]

Name Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Anodontosaurus[5]

Valid

Late Cretaceous (Edmontonian)

Horseshoe Canyon Formation

 Canada

An ankylosaurid.

Anodontosaurus.tif

Antarctosaurus

Valid

Late Cretaceous (early Campanian)

Anacleto Formation

 Argentina

A titanosaur.

Campylodon[6]

Preoccupied.

Late Cretaceous

unknown

 Argentina

Preoccupied by Dumeril, 1852. Renamed Campylodoniscus.

Helopus[7]

Preoccupied.

  • Wiman

Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian)

Mengyin Formation

 China

Preoccupied by Wagler, renamed Euhelopus.

Laplatasaurus[6]

Valid taxon

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian)

Allen Formation

 Argentina

A titanosaur related to members of Lognkosauria.

Loricosaurus[6]

Nomen dubium

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian)

Allen Formation

 Argentina

A titanosaur.

Paranthodon[8]

Valid taxon

Early Cretaceous (Berriasian)

Kirkwood Formation

 South Africa

A stegosaur.

Paranthodon.jpg

Rhodanosaurus[8]

Nomen dubium

  • Nopcsa

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian)

Gres a Reptiles

 France

A dubious nodosaurid.

Tanius[7]

Valid taxon
  • Wiman

Late Cretaceous

Jingangkou Formation

 China

A derived hadrosauroid.

Tanius.jpg

Teinurosaurus

Nomen dubium.

  • Nopcsa

Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian)

unknown

 Portugal

A neotheropod.

Synapsids[edit]

Non-mammalian[edit]

Name Status Authors Age Location Images

Eoarctops

Valid

Broom 256 million of years ago  South Africa

Hipposaurus

Valid

Haughton 262 million of years ago

Lycaenodontoides

Synonym

Scullya

Valid

Styracocephalus

Valid

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gini-Newman, Garfield; Graham, Elizabeth (2001). Echoes from the past: world history to the 16th century. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. ISBN 9780070887398. OCLC 46769716. 
  2. ^ Willmann, R. (1989). "Rediscovered: Permotipula patricia, the oldest known fly". Naturwissenschaften. 76 (8): 375–377. doi:10.1007/BF00366210. 
  3. ^ Janensch, W. (1929). Sanders, Manley, and Carpenter (2001), "Table 12.1" page 167.
  4. ^ Olshevsky, George. "Dinogeorge's Dinosaur Genera List". Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  5. ^ Sternberg, C.H. 1929. A toothless armored dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Alberta. Bull. Natl. Mus. Can. 54: pp. 28-33.
  6. ^ a b c Huene, F. von. 1929. Los Saurisquios y Ornithisquios de Cretaceo Argentino. An. Mus. La Plata (ser. 2) 3:pp. 1-196.
  7. ^ a b Wiman, C. 1929. Die Kreide-dinosaurier aus Shantung. Pal. Sin. C 1: pp. 1-67.
  8. ^ a b Nopcsa, F. 1929. Dinosaurierreste aus Siebenburgen. V. Geol. Hungarica Set. Paleontol. 4: pp. 1-76.
  • Janensch, W. (1929). Magensteine bei Sauropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten. Palaeontographica (Suppl. 7) 2:135-144.
  • Sanders F, Manley K, Carpenter K. Gastroliths from the Lower Cretaceous sauropod Cedarosaurus weiskopfae. In: Tanke D.H, Carpenter K, editors. Mesozoic vertebrate life: new research inspired by the paleontology of Philip J. Currie. Indiana University Press; Bloomington, IN: 2001. pp. 166–180.