1995 in Australia

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The following lists events that happened during 1995 in Australia.

1995 in Australia
Monarchy Elizabeth II
Governor-General Bill Hayden
Prime minister Paul Keating
Population 17,071,758
Elections ACT, NSW, QLD

Flag of Australia.svg
1995
in
Australia

Decades:
See also:

Incumbents[edit]

Premiers and Chief Ministers[edit]

Governors and Administrators[edit]

Events[edit]

January[edit]

  • 23 January – The Tasmanian Conservation Foundation commences court proceedings to overturn 2 of the 11 woodchip licenses issued by the Federal Government.
  • 30 JanuaryJohn Howard becomes federal Liberal Party leader and thus federal leader of the opposition after the resignation of Alexander Downer.

February[edit]

March[edit]

  • 10 March
    • Ian McLachlan resigns his shadow portfolio of Environment for having misled Parliament over the opening of secret Aboriginal women's documents relating to the proposed construction of a bridge to Hindmarsh Island, South Australia.
    • The New South Wales Government announces 7 new parks and reserves, adding 6,000 hectares to the New South Wales National Parks estate.
  • 18 March – The campaign to save the Tarkine wilderness achieves success a week after the arrest of Trish Caswell, Australian Conservation Foundation Executive Director, for trespass, when Australian Heritage Commission Chair, Wendy McCarthy, announces its interim listing for May.
  • 25 March

April[edit]

May[edit]

  • 9 May – The Federal Budget is delivered. The Budget's enormous turnaround in projected revenue, from a deficit of $12.9 billion to a small surplus, is received with scepticism by many commentators.
  • 30 MayDorothy Davis disappeared. Believed murdered, her remains had not been located as of 4 August 2016, when the man convicted of her murder died.

June[edit]

  • JuneJulyQantas is privatised.
  • 7 June – Prime Minister Paul Keating announces to Parliament that Australia would have a referendum on the republic with a head of state elected by Parliament by a majority of at least two-thirds.
  • 8 June – The Tasmanian Labor Party and unions reach a historic agreement to overturn the Groom industrial relations regime if Labor wins office.
  • 20 June – The Federal Labor Caucus selects Kim Beazley to replace Brian Howe who unexpectedly stepped down as deputy leader.
  • 30 June - Democrats Leader Cheryl Kernot launches the Democrats' "Keeping the Senate Strong" campaign, attacking the "anarchical" Greens.

July[edit]

  • 1 July – Telecom Australia changes its domestic trading name to Telstra.
  • 15 July – The Queensland state election, 1995 produces a hung Parliament, with Labor holding a one-seat majority over the Liberal/National coalition, as well as suffering a 7% swing and the loss of 9 seats.
  • 17 July – The West Australian Government's Royal Commission into former West Australian Premier Carmen Lawrence's role in the Easton affair opens in Perth, Western Australia, an inquiry earlier labelled by Prime Minister Paul Keating as a "flagrant abuse of the judicial system".
  • 25 July – The count in Mundingburra is complete. Labor wins by 16 votes, with Labor claiming a one-seat victory (45 seats), Nationals won 29 seats, Liberals won 14 seats and 1 Independent.

August[edit]

  • 2 August – A combined Queensland Opposition Coalition frontbench is announced, with Joan Sheldon as Deputy Leader and Shadow Treasurer.
  • 5 August – Federal Opposition Leader John Howard expels Noel Crichton-Browne from the Federal Liberal party room.
  • 7 August – A second West Australian Federal MP leaves the Liberal Party to sit as an Independent, following the bitter power struggle in the West Australian branch.
  • 16 August – New South Wales Premier Bob Carr concedes that his pre-election promise to lift the tolls on the M4 and M5 tollways in western Sydney would be abandoned as being impossibly expensive.
  • 25 August – Labor's National Executive bans ALP members from associating with the right-wing League of Rights. When maverick Kalgoorlie MP, Graeme Campbell, persists in his association and espousal of anti-immigration views embarrassing to the party, his pre-selection is revoked, causing him to resign.
  • 31 August – The cast bronze statue of the dog Larry La Trobe situated on the northern end of Melbourne's City Square is stolen.

September[edit]

  • 8 SeptemberNoel Crichton-Browne is expelled from the Liberal Party.
  • 13 September – The Queensland Government abandons the controversial Eastern Tollway to link Brisbane with the Gold Coast, having lost 4 seats in the affected area.

October[edit]

  • 11 OctoberJohn Fahey is selected as Liberal candidate for the marginal seat of Macarthur.
  • 20 OctoberBrenda Hodge, the last person to be sentenced to death in Australia before the full abolition of capital punishment, is paroled from prison after serving eleven years of a life sentence.
  • 24 OctoberAnna Wood, a 15-year-old schoolgirl from Sydney, dies after taking ecstasy at a rave. Her death sparks a media firestorm and a national debate over the use of illicit drugs.

November[edit]

  • November – The rabbit calicivirus disease (RCD) escapes from an island testing station in South Australia & quickly spreads into Victoria. It is estimated that the feral rabbit population would be permanently reduced by 60%.
  • 1 November – Federal Opposition Leader John Howard attempts to mend relations with the Asian community, telling Chinese business people in Melbourne how he values their commercial networks.
  • 3 November- After a six-month trial, David Harold Eastman is convicted by a jury of the assassination of Australian Federal Police Assistant Commissioner Colin Winchester. He is sentenced to life imprisonment and can only be released by approval of the ACT parliament, Federal Parliament and the Governor-General.
  • 7 November – The Federal Court of Australia rules against Minister Tickner's ban on the building of a bridge to Hindmarsh Island in South Australia.
  • 14 November – Commissioner Marks delivers his final report, damning Carmen Lawrence's role in the Easton affair, the weight of her colleagues' evidence being against her version.
  • 15 November – Legislation decriminalising owning or working in a brothel is passed by the New South Wales Legislative Council, thereby fulfilling the recommendations of the Wood police corruption inquiry.
  • 20 November – South Australian Democrat and former leader Senator John Coulter resigns due to ill health, warning Cheryl Kernot that the party risked losing votes by becoming too mainstream. John Coulter is replaced by former student activist and party worker Natasha Stott Despoja.
  • 26 November – The Australian Women's Party is launched in Brisbane, Queensland by a group which includes disenchanted Labor women.

December[edit]

  • 1 December – A new licence for a trial shipment of 200,000 tonnes of woodchips to Taiwan reignites plans for a "Son of Wesley Vale" pulp mill for northern Tasmania.
  • 3 December – The Anzac Bridge in Sydney is opened to traffic.
  • 4 December – A gas explosion at Kogarah railway station, Sydney kills two people.
  • 7 December – A full bench of the Federal Court of Australia rejects Minister Tickner's appeal against their 7 November ruling.
  • 8 December – In the Court of Disputed Returns, Mr. Justice Brian Ambrose orders a fresh election in Mundingburra, Queensland after finding some 22 soldiers serving in Rwanda had effectively been disenfranchised in the Queensland state election, 1995.
  • 10 December – Tasmanian Premier Ray Groom hands back to Tasmania's indigenous people 12 sacred and cultural sites totalling 3,800 hectares in an historic ceremony at Kidson Cove.
  • 15 December – The Queensland Labor Party replaces former member and current candidate for Mundingburra, Ken Davies, with Townsville Mayor Tony Mooney, provoking a voter backlash.
  • 21 December – South Australian Royal Commissioner, Iris Stevens finds that Aboriginal women had "fabricated" beliefs on which they grounded opposition to the building of the Hindmarsh bridge.

Film[edit]

Television[edit]

Sport[edit]

Births[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peter, O'Shea. "Out of the field". The Advocate. Here Publishing. Retrieved 10 October 2011.