2013 World Championships in Athletics

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14th IAAF World Championships in Athletics
Чемпионат мира по лёгкой атлетике 2013
2013 World Championships in Athletics logo.png
Host city Moscow, Russia
Nations participating 203 (on 206 set)[1]
Athletes participating 1,784
Events 47
Dates 10–18 August 2013
Main venue Luzhniki Stadium
Daegu 2011 Beijing 2015  >

The 14th IAAF World Championships in Athletics (Moscow 2013)[2] was an international athletics competition held in Moscow, Russia, from 10–18 August 2013. Initially, Russia won the most gold medals to top the table for the first time since 2001, it was also the first time ever the host nation took the top of the medal table. However, after disqualification of Russian sprinter Antonina Krivoshapka and following redistribution of medals in the Women's 4 × 400 metres relay, United States topped the medal table with seven golds; in the overall medal count, the United States won 26 medals in total, followed by Russia with 14 and Kenya with 12. With 1,784 athletes from 203 countries it was the biggest single sports event of the year,[3] the number of spectators for the evening sessions was 268,548 surpassing Daegu 2011.[4]

Jamaica's Usain Bolt and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce both won three gold medals in the men's and women's 100 metres, 200 metres and 4×100 metres relay respectively to become the most successful athletes at the event. This achievement also earned Bolt the title of being the most successful athlete in the history of the World Championships with eight gold and two silver medals. Prior to the competition, four sprinters were banned on doping charges.[5]

Bidding process[edit]

When the seeking deadline passed on 1 December 2006, four candidate cities had confirmed their candidatures,[6] these were: Barcelona (Spain), Brisbane (Australia), Moscow (Russia) and Gothenburg (Sweden). The IAAF announced Moscow the winning candidate at the IAAF Council Meeting in Mombasa on 27 March 2007.[7]

Gothenburg backed out already in December, citing lack of financial support from the Swedish government.[8] Barcelona had a record of hosting the 1992 Summer Olympics and the 1995 IAAF World Indoor Championships. It was chosen over Madrid and Valencia, which were at one point outlined as possible candidates.[6] (Barcelona was later selected as the host for the 2010 European Athletics Championships).

Brisbane simultaneously bid for 2011 and 2013 World Championships with the primary focus being on the 2011 event.[9] Queensland Sport and Athletics Centre (ANZ Stadium) was the proposed venue, the venue had hosted the 1982 Commonwealth Games and 2001 Goodwill Games.[10] It was also a failed bidder for the 2009 World Championships in Athletics, which was eventually won by Berlin.

In the case of Moscow, Deputy Mayor Valery Vinogradov announced on 13 March 2006 that the city would bid for the 2011 Championships and suggested Luzhniki Stadium as venue. When the IAAF elected to decide the 2011 and 2013 events at the same meeting, Moscow added its name to the 2013 list, the city had hosted the 1980 Summer Olympics (also at the Luzhniki Stadium) and the 2006 IAAF World Indoor Championships.[6]

Venue[edit]

Main venue was Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow with a capacity of 78,360 spectators.[11]

2013 World Championships Athletics panorama.

Event schedule[edit]

Day by day event schedule of the 2013 championships
Q Qualifiers H Heats ½ Semifinals F Final

Reference:[12]

Event summary[edit]

Sparrow mascot of the event.[13]

The championships featured 3 championship records, 22 world leadings, 2 area records, 48 national records but no world records;[14] in addition to gold medals, individual winners received prize money of $60,000 where as members of winning relay teams received $20,000.[3]

Men[edit]

Usain Bolt of Jamaica moved to the top of the all-time World Championships medal table by winning three gold medals. He won the 100 metres, the 200 metres, and Jamaica won the 4x100 metre relay behind a strong anchor leg from Bolt who passed the United States' Justin Gatlin down the stretch, it was Bolt's second three gold performance at the World Championships. After the meet, his career total stood at 8 golds and 2 silvers, narrowly surpassing Carl Lewis' 8 golds, 1 silver, and 1 bronze.[15] Trinidad and Tobago's Jehue Gordon edged America's Michael Tinsley by a hundredth of a second to win the 400 metre hurdles, it was the first gold for Trinidad and Tobago since 1997. Serbia's Emir Bekrić took bronze in national record time. Félix Sánchez, competing for the Dominican Republic, also made the final of the event, marking his seventh consecutive World Championship 400 metre hurdles final.[16]

Great Britain's Mo Farah won the 5,000 metres and 10,000 metres to become the second man in history to win both events at both the World Champions and the Olympics, the only man to do it before had been Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia.[17] Stephen Kiprotich of Uganda became the first non-Kenyan to win the marathon at the World Championships since 2005. It was also Uganda's first men's title in the history of the event. Kiprotich became only the second man, after Gezahegne Abera, to follow an Olympic marathon gold medal with a world championship marathon gold medal. Ethiopians Lelisa Desisa and Tadese Tola took second and third respectively.[18]

In the high jump, Bohdan Bondarenko set a Championship record of 2.41 (7'10.75") en route to a gold medal in a highly competitive final. Mutaz Essa Barshim of Qatar took second and Derek Drouin set a Canadian national record while winning bronze.[19]

Track[edit]

Usain Bolt of Jamaica, winner of the men's 100 metres, here during the heats.
Medalists of the 110 metres hurdles
Aleksandr Ivanov of Russia, winner of the 20 km (12 mi) walk
Mo Farah of Great Britain, winner of the 5,000m and 10,000m
Chronology: 2009 | 2011 | 2013 | 2015 | 2017
Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 metres
details
Usain Bolt
 Jamaica (JAM)
9.77
WL
Justin Gatlin
 United States (USA)
9.85
SB
Nesta Carter
 Jamaica (JAM)
9.95
200 metres
details
Usain Bolt
 Jamaica (JAM)
19.66
WL
Warren Weir
 Jamaica (JAM)
19.79
=PB
Curtis Mitchell
 United States (USA)
20.04
400 metres
details
LaShawn Merritt
 United States (USA)
43.74
WL, PB
Tony McQuay
 United States (USA)
44.40
PB
Luguelín Santos
 Dominican Republic (DOM)
44.52
SB
800 metres
details
Mohammed Aman
 Ethiopia (ETH)
1:43.31
SB
Nick Symmonds
 United States (USA)
1:43.55
SB
Ayanleh Souleiman
 Djibouti (DJI)
1:43.76
1500 metres
details
Asbel Kiprop
 Kenya (KEN)
3:36.28 Matthew Centrowitz, Jr.
 United States (USA)
3:36.78 Johan Cronje
 South Africa (RSA)
3:36.83
5000 metres
details
Mo Farah
 Great Britain & N.I. (GBR)
13:26.98 Hagos Gebrhiwet
 Ethiopia (ETH)
13:27.26 Isiah Koech
 Kenya (KEN)
13:27.26
10,000 metres
details
Mo Farah
 Great Britain & N.I. (GBR)
27:21.71
SB
Ibrahim Jeilan
 Ethiopia (ETH)
27:22.23
SB
Paul Tanui
 Kenya (KEN)
27:22.61
Marathon
details
Stephen Kiprotich
 Uganda (UGA)
2:09:51 Lelisa Desisa
 Ethiopia (ETH)
2:10:12 Tadese Tola
 Ethiopia (ETH)
2:10:23
110 metres hurdles
details
David Oliver
 United States (USA)
13.00
WL
Ryan Wilson
 United States (USA)
13.13 Sergey Shubenkov
 Russia (RUS)
13.24
400 metres hurdles
details
Jehue Gordon
 Trinidad and Tobago (TRI)
47.69
WL, NR
Michael Tinsley
 United States (USA)
47.70
PB
Emir Bekrić
 Serbia (SRB)
48.05
NR
3000 metres steeplechase
details
Ezekiel Kemboi
 Kenya (KEN)
8:06.01 Conseslus Kipruto
 Kenya (KEN)
8:06.37 Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad
 France (FRA)
8:07.86
20 kilometres walk
details
Aleksandr Ivanov
 Russia (RUS)
1:20:58
PB
Chen Ding
 China (CHN)
1:21:09
SB
Miguel Ángel López
 Spain (ESP)
1:21:21
SB
50 kilometres walk
details
Robert Heffernan
 Ireland (IRL)
3:37:56
WL
Jared Tallent
 Australia (AUS)
3:40:03
SB
Ihor Hlavan
 Ukraine (UKR)
3:40:39
PB
4 × 100 metres relay
details
 Jamaica (JAM)
Nesta Carter
Kemar Bailey-Cole
Nickel Ashmeade
Usain Bolt
Oshane Bailey*
Warren Weir*
37.36
WL
 United States (USA)
Charles Silmon
Mike Rodgers
Rakieem Salaam
Justin Gatlin
37.66  Canada (CAN)
Gavin Smellie
Aaron Brown
Dontae Richards-Kwok
Justyn Warner
37.92
SB
4 × 400 metres relay
details
 United States (USA)
David Verburg
Tony McQuay
Arman Hall
LaShawn Merritt
Joshua Mance*
James Harris*
2:58.71
WL
 Jamaica (JAM)
Rusheen McDonald
Edino Steele
Omar Johnson
Javon Francis
Javere Bell*
2:59.88
SB
 Great Britain & N.I. (GBR)
Conrad Williams
Martyn Rooney
Michael Bingham
Nigel Levine
Jamie Bowie*
3:00.88
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)
* Medalists who participated in heats only.

Field[edit]

Raphael Holzdeppe and Björn Otto of Germany, the gold and bronze medalist of the men's pole vault.
Ashton Eaton of United States, winner of the men's decathlon.
Chronology: 2009 | 2011 | 2013 | 2015 | 2017
Event Gold Silver Bronze
High jump
details
Bohdan Bondarenko
 Ukraine (UKR)
2.41
WL, CR, =NR
Mutaz Essa Barshim
 Qatar (QAT)
2.38 Derek Drouin
 Canada (CAN)
2.38
NR
Pole vault
details
Raphael Holzdeppe
 Germany (GER)
5.89 Renaud Lavillenie
 France (FRA)
5.89 Björn Otto
 Germany (GER)
5.82
Long jump
details
Aleksandr Menkov
 Russia (RUS)
8.56
WL, NR
Ignisious Gaisah
 Netherlands (NED)
8.29
NR
Luis Rivera
 Mexico (MEX)
8.27
Triple jump
details
Teddy Tamgho
 France (FRA)
18.04
WL, NR
Pedro Pablo Pichardo
 Cuba (CUB)
17.68 Will Claye
 United States (USA)
17.52
SB
Shot put
details
David Storl
 Germany (GER)
21.73
SB
Ryan Whiting
 United States (USA)
21.57 Dylan Armstrong
 Canada (CAN)
21.34
SB
Discus throw
details
Robert Harting
 Germany (GER)
69.11 Piotr Małachowski
 Poland (POL)
68.36 Gerd Kanter
 Estonia (EST)
65.19
Javelin throw
details
Vítězslav Veselý
 Czech Republic (CZE)
87.17 Tero Pitkämäki
 Finland (FIN)
87.07 Dmitriy Tarabin
 Russia (RUS)
86.23
Hammer throw
details
Paweł Fajdek
 Poland (POL)
81.97
WL, PB
Krisztián Pars
 Hungary (HUN)
80.30 Lukáš Melich
 Czech Republic (CZE)
79.36
Decathlon
details
Ashton Eaton
 United States (USA)
8809
WL
Michael Schrader
 Germany (GER)
8670
PB
Damian Warner
 Canada (CAN)
8512
PB
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Women[edit]

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce became the first woman in World Championships history to sweep the sprint events when anchored Jamaica to gold in the 4×100 metre relay. Jamaica's time of 41.29 set a Championships record. Earlier in the meet, Fraser-Pryce won the 100 metres and the 200 metres;[15] in the final of the 200 metres, Allyson Felix tore her right hamstring. A photo-finish gave Murielle Ahoure of the Ivory Coast the silver over Nigeria's Blessing Okagbare after both finished in the same time.[17]

Great Britain's Christine Ohuruogu won the 400 metres in a national record time of 49.41. She came from behind to edge out defending champion Amantle Montsho of Botswana by 4 thousands of a second in a photo finish.[20] Zuzana Hejnova won gold and set a Czech national record in the 400-metre hurdles.[16] Eunice Sum of Kenya won her first major title, besting Olympic champion Mariya Savinova of Russia in the 800 metres.[15]

In the 4×400 m relay, although the United States suffered a time-wasting exchange on the final leg, the Americans won by more than two seconds over Great Britain and France. The medal ceremony for the event took place at the 2017 IAAF World Championships in London upon the certification of results by the IAAF following the retroactive disqualification of first-place Russia when Antonina Krivoshapka was retroactively disqualified on a positive drug test in a 2017 retest of samples.[18]

Russia's Tatyana Lysenko set a World Championships record in the hammer throw en route to the gold.[17] Caterine Ibargüen won Colombia's first ever World Championship gold by finishing first in the triple jump.[16] Christina Obergföll of Germany won her first World Championships title in javelin.[15]

Track[edit]

Christine Ohuruogu of Great Britain, winner of the 400 metres
Edna Kiplagat after winning the marathon
Chronology: 2009 | 2011 | 2013 | 2015 | 2017
Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 metres
details
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
 Jamaica (JAM)
10.71
WL
Murielle Ahouré
 Ivory Coast (CIV)
10.93 Carmelita Jeter
 United States (USA)
10.94
200 metres
details
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
 Jamaica (JAM)
22.17 Murielle Ahouré
 Ivory Coast (CIV)
22.32 Blessing Okagbare
 Nigeria (NGR)
22.32
400 metres
details
Christine Ohuruogu
 Great Britain & N.I. (GBR)
49.41
NR
Amantle Montsho
 Botswana (BOT)
49.41 Stephenie Ann McPherson
 Jamaica (JAM)
49.99
800 metres
details
Eunice Jepkoech Sum
 Kenya (KEN)
1:57.38
PB
Brenda Martinez
 United States (USA)
1:57.91
PB
Alysia Montaño
 United States (USA)
1:57.95
1500 metres
details
Abeba Aregawi
 Sweden (SWE)
4:02.67 Jennifer Simpson
 United States (USA)
4:02.99 Hellen Onsando Obiri
 Kenya (KEN)
4:03.86
5000 metres
details
Meseret Defar
 Ethiopia (ETH)
14:50.19 Mercy Cherono
 Kenya (KEN)
14:51.22 Almaz Ayana
 Ethiopia (ETH)
14:51.33
10,000 metres
details
Tirunesh Dibaba
 Ethiopia (ETH)
30:43.35 Gladys Cherono
 Kenya (KEN)
30:45.17 Belaynesh Oljira
 Ethiopia (ETH)
30:46.98
Marathon
details
Edna Kiplagat
 Kenya (KEN)
2:25:44 Valeria Straneo
 Italy (ITA)
2:25:58
SB
Kayoko Fukushi
 Japan (JPN)
2:27:45
100 metres hurdles
details
Brianna Rollins
 United States (USA)
12.44 Sally Pearson
 Australia (AUS)
12.50
SB
Tiffany Porter
 Great Britain & N.I. (GBR)
12.55
PB
400 metres hurdles
details
Zuzana Hejnová
 Czech Republic (CZE)
52.83
WL, NR
Dalilah Muhammad
 United States (USA)
54.09 Lashinda Demus
 United States (USA)
54.27
3000 metres steeplechase
details
Milcah Chemos Cheywa
 Kenya (KEN)
9:11.65
WL
Lydiah Chepkurui
 Kenya (KEN)
9:12.55
PB
Sofia Assefa
 Ethiopia (ETH)
9:12.84
SB
20 kilometres walk
details
Elena Lashmanova
 Russia (RUS)
1:27:08 Anisya Kirdyapkina
 Russia (RUS)
1:27:11 Liu Hong
 China (CHN)
1:28:10
4 × 100 metres relay
details
 Jamaica (JAM)
Carrie Russell
Kerron Stewart
Schillonie Calvert
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
Sheri-Ann Brooks*
41.29
WL, CR
 United States (USA)
Jeneba Tarmoh
Alexandria Anderson
English Gardner
Octavious Freeman
42.75  Great Britain & N.I. (GBR)
Dina Asher-Smith
Ashleigh Nelson
Annabelle Lewis
Hayley Jones
42.87
4 × 400 metres relay
details
 United States (USA)
Jessica Beard
Natasha Hastings
Ashley Spencer
Francena McCorory
Joanna Atkins*
3:20.41
SB[21]
 Great Britain & N.I. (GBR)
Eilidh Child
Shana Cox
Margaret Adeoye
Christine Ohuruogu

3:22.61
SB
 France (FRA)
Marie Gayot
Lénora Guion-Firmin
Muriel Hurtis
Floria Gueï
Phara Anacharsis*
3:24.21
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)
* Runners who participated in the heats only and received medals.

Field[edit]

Chronology: 2009 | 2011 | 2013 | 2015 | 2017
Women jump event winners
Caterine Ibargüen (COL) won the women's triple jump
Caterine Ibargüen (COL), triple jump
Svetlana Shkolina (RUS) won the women's high jump
Svetlana Shkolina (RUS), high jump
Brittney Reese (USA) won the women's long jump
Brittney Reese (USA), long jump
Event Gold Silver Bronze
High jump
details
Svetlana Shkolina
 Russia (RUS)
2.03
PB
Brigetta Barrett
 United States (USA)
2.00 Anna Chicherova
 Russia (RUS)
Ruth Beitia
 Spain (ESP)
1.97
Pole vault
details
Yelena Isinbayeva
 Russia (RUS)
4.89
SB
Jenn Suhr
 United States (USA)
4.82 Yarisley Silva
 Cuba (CUB)
4.82
Long jump
details
Brittney Reese
 United States (USA)
7.01 Blessing Okagbare
 Nigeria (NGR)
6.99 Ivana Španović
 Serbia (SRB)
6.82
NR
Triple jump
details
Caterine Ibargüen
 Colombia (COL)
14.85
WL
Ekaterina Koneva
 Russia (RUS)
14.81 Olha Saladuha
 Ukraine (UKR)
14.65
Shot put
details
Valerie Adams
 New Zealand (NZL)
20.88 Christina Schwanitz
 Germany (GER)
20.41
PB
Gong Lijiao
 China (CHN)
19.95
Discus throw
details
Sandra Perković
 Croatia (CRO)
67.99 Mélina Robert-Michon
 France (FRA)
66.28
NR
Yarelys Barrios
 Cuba (CUB)
64.96
Hammer throw
details
Tatyana Lysenko
 Russia (RUS)
78.80
WL, CR, NR
Anita Włodarczyk
 Poland (POL)
78.46
NR
Zhang Wenxiu
 China (CHN)
75.58
SB
Javelin throw
details
Christina Obergföll
 Germany (GER)
69.05
SB
Kimberley Mickle
 Australia (AUS)
66.60
PB
Mariya Abakumova
 Russia (RUS)
65.09
Heptathlon
details
Hanna Melnychenko
 Ukraine (UKR)
6586
PB
Brianne Theisen-Eaton
 Canada (CAN)
6530
PB
Dafne Schippers
 Netherlands (NED)
6477
NR
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Reference:[22]

Statistics[edit]

Medals[edit]

A total of 47 sets of medals were distributed between 38 countries.[23][n 1] Initially, host nation Russia topped the medal table with seven gold medals. However, after disqualification of Russian sprinter Antonina Krivoshapka and following redistribution of medals in the Women's 4 × 400 metres relay, United States topped the medal table with seven golds; in the overall medal count, the United States won 26 medals in total, followed by Russia with 14 and Kenya with 12.[15]

Flag parade during opening ceremony
Scene from the opening ceremony
Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  United States (USA) 7 13 5 25
2  Russia (RUS) 6 2 4 12
3  Jamaica (JAM) 6 2 2 10
4  Kenya (KEN) 5 4 3 12
5  Germany (GER) 4 2 1 7
6  Ethiopia (ETH) 3 3 4 10
7  Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 3 1 3 7
8  Ukraine (UKR) 2 0 2 4
9  Czech Republic (CZE) 2 0 1 3
10  France (FRA) 1 2 2 5
11  Poland (POL) 1 2 0 3
12  Colombia (COL) 1 0 0 1
 Croatia (CRO) 1 0 0 1
 Ireland (IRL) 1 0 0 1
 New Zealand (NZL) 1 0 0 1
 Sweden (SWE) 1 0 0 1
 Trinidad and Tobago (TRI) 1 0 0 1
 Uganda (UGA) 1 0 0 1
19  Australia (AUS) 0 3 0 3
20  Ivory Coast (CIV) 0 2 0 2
21  Canada (CAN) 0 1 4 5
22  China (CHN) 0 1 3 4
23  Cuba (CUB) 0 1 2 3
24  Netherlands (NED) 0 1 1 2
 Nigeria (NGR) 0 1 1 2
26  Botswana (BOT) 0 1 0 1
 Finland (FIN) 0 1 0 1
 Hungary (HUN) 0 1 0 1
 Italy (ITA) 0 1 0 1
 Qatar (QAT) 0 1 0 1
31  Serbia (SRB) 0 0 2 2
 Spain (ESP) 0 0 2 2
33  Djibouti (DJI) 0 0 1 1
 Dominican Republic (DOM) 0 0 1 1
 Estonia (EST) 0 0 1 1
 Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1
 Mexico (MEX) 0 0 1 1
 South Africa (RSA) 0 0 1 1
Total 47 47 48 142

Points[edit]

The IAAF Placing Table assigns eight points to the first place and so on to the eight finalists (except teams that do not start or are disqualified). 60 IAAF members received points.[24]

Rank Country 1st, gold medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) 3rd, bronze medalist(s) 4 5 6 7 8 Pts
1  United States (USA) 7 13 5 9 6 9 2 7 283
2  Russia (RUS) 6 3 5 1 8 1 9 5 183
3  Kenya (KEN) 5 4 3 6 2 3 3 0 139
4  Germany (GER) 4 2 1 7 2 1 1 2 102
5  Jamaica (JAM) 6 2 1 4 2 0 0 4 100
6  Ethiopia (ETH) 3 3 4 2 3 0 2 2 97
7  Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 3 1 2 2 5 1 1 2 80
8  Ukraine (UKR) 2 0 1 2 2 1 4 0 51
9  France (FRA) 1 2 1 2 0 0 5 2 50
10  Poland (POL) 1 2 0 1 0 4 2 1 44
11  China (CHN) 0 1 3 2 0 2 0 1 42
12  Canada (CAN) 0 1 4 0 0 3 0 1 41
13  Czech Republic (CZE) 2 0 1 0 2 0 3 2 38
14  Cuba (CUB) 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 32
15  Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1 2 4 0 0 31
16  Australia (AUS) 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 27
17  Netherlands (NED) 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 24
 Spain (ESP) 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0
19  Brazil (BRA) 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 1 19
 Italy (ITA) 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 1
 Nigeria (NGR) 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0
22  South Africa (RSA) 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 18
23  Ivory Coast (CIV) 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 14
24  Trinidad and Tobago (TRI) 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 13
25  Serbia (SRB) 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 12
 Sweden (SWE) 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
27  Dominican Republic (DOM) 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 10
 Finland (FIN) 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0
29  Belgium (BEL) 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 9
30  Bahamas (BAH) 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 8
 Colombia (COL) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Croatia (CRO) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Hungary (HUN) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
 Ireland (IRL) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Mexico (MEX) 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
 New Zealand (NZL) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Uganda (UGA) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
38  Botswana (BOT) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
 Qatar (QAT) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
40  Djibouti (DJI) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6
 Estonia (EST) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
 Portugal (POR) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
43  Belarus (BLR) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5
 Romania (ROM) 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
 Slovakia (SVK) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
 Slovenia (SLO) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
47  Norway (NOR) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 4
 Saudi Arabia (KSA) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
 Tajikistan (TJK) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
50  Bahrain (BHR) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3
 Israel (ISR) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
 Puerto Rico (PUR) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
53  Argentina (ARG) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2
 Grenada (GRN) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
 India (IND) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
 Senegal (SEN) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
57  Bulgaria (BUL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
 Egypt (EGY) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
 Eritrea (ERI) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
 North Korea (PRK) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Total 47 47 48 46 48 46 47 43 1690

   Host.

Participating nations[edit]

206 countries (or more accurately, IAAF members) participated with a total of 1974 athletes. The biggest delegation was the one of USA with 137 athletes, the number of athletes sent per nation is show in parentheses.

Reference:[25]

Broadcasting[edit]

American coverage[edit]

In the United States the IAAF sold exclusive rights to Universal Sports, a network associated with NBC Sports.[29] Universal Sports can only be seen in about ten percent of the households in the American market.[30][31] While NBC provided an hour and a half of coverage on weekend days, Universal Sports limited other distribution of the content, even online content requiring login with cable subscription user names,[32] for those viewers without access to Universal Sports, nationwide coverage of the entire meet was generally limited to six hours of weekend coverage. The IAAF provided short YouTube highlight clips,[33] a fraction of the online coverage they provided from Daegu two years earlier, instead promoting an internet radio feed and Twitter updates.

Controversies[edit]

Emma Green Tregaro (SWE) painted her nails in support of gay rights

The introduction of a Russia federal law in June banning "homosexual propaganda" affected the championships hosted in Moscow. Western and international bodies had already condemned the move prior to the event, which was scheduled several months prior to the more prominent 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi,[34] the IAAF deputy secretary general, Nick Davies, stated that the international nature of the competition might alter the country's perspective, but that the matter of gay rights would not be addressed by the championships, as long as its athletes were unaffected.[35] Russian politician Vitaly Milonov had stated that the law would apply to athletes and tourists in the same way as Russian citizens,[36] he also said those suggesting a boycott of the championships in protest of the laws were merely avoiding their competitors, saying "sports competitions are a place where there can't be any politics".[37]

Several athletes voiced their concerns over the issue of gay rights in Russia, but none boycotted the event. American runner Nick Symmonds, a supporter of the NOH8 Campaign for equal rights, said he would respect the host nation and its laws and would focus on sporting competition only in Moscow. However, he maintained his position as an advocate of gay rights and would silently dedicate his performance "to my gay and lesbian friends back home".[38]

Two Swedish athletes, high jumper Emma Green Tregaro and sprinter Moa Hjelmer, attracted attention when they painted their nails in a rainbow pattern in support of gay rights and displayed the colours during the qualifying rounds.[39][40] The IAAF notified the Swedish Athletics Federation that this gesture was in breach of rules on athlete conduct, the Swedish officials stood by Green Tregaro, but she relented under the pressure – in the high jump finals, she sported all red nails as a symbol of love.[18][41] While watching the high jump finals, Paavo Arhinmäki, the Finnish Minister for Culture and Sport, waved a rainbow flag at the arena.[42] Hjelmer had been eliminated in the first round of the 200 metres and did not compete again at the championships.[43]

Yelena Isinbayeva's (RUS) who caused controversy

Russia's Yelena Isinbayeva was a popular winner in the women's pole vault, but later drew controversy for her remarks criticizing Green Tregaro's nails,[16] she said the protests were disrespectful towards the host nation and commented in English: "We consider ourselves like normal, standard people, we just live boys with women, girls with boys...We have our law which everyone has to respect. When we go to different countries, we try to follow their rules."[44] Following the negative reactions from other athletes and Western media she said that she had been misunderstood due to her grasp of English: "What I wanted to say was that people should respect the laws of other countries particularly when they are guests, but let me make it clear I respect the views of my fellow athletes, and let me state in the strongest terms that I am opposed to any discrimination against gay people on the grounds of their sexuality (which is against the Olympic Charter)."[45]

During the medal ceremony for the women's 4×400 metres relay images of Kseniya Ryzhova and Yuliya Gushchina[n 2] sharing a kiss on the lips spread through social media and were interpreted as a protest against the anti-gay laws.[46][47] Both Ryzhova and Gushchina denied any intention to make such a protest, rather they were simply happy with their athletic success, and stated that they were married to men,[48] although reports were principally focused on the pair, all four of the Russia relay runners briefly kissed each other on the podium.[49] Ryzhova described her assumed connection to LGBT as insulting,[50] the Russian Minister for Sport, Vitaly Mutko, said that Western media had over-emphasised the issue, noting that same-sex relations are not illegal in Russia and sparser coverage of the issue in domestic media.[51]

Anti-doping[edit]

Russia's 2012 Olympic discus medallist Darya Pishchalnikova was among those banned for doping prior to the championships

At the championships the IAAF collected blood samples from all participating athletes, following the procedure introduced at the 2011 World Championships in Athletics, in line with supporting its Athlete Biological Passport programme. This assisted the federation in detecting athlete's potential usage of banned substances, including steroids, human growth hormone, EPO and blood doping. In addition to the mandatory blood tests, the IAAF also conducted around 500 urine tests at the championships in three groups: all medallists were subjected to urine tests, those showing biological passport anomalies were targeted, and random urine tests were also applied. Continuing with procedures initiated at the 2005 edition, all urine tests were scheduled for long-term storage to allow retrospective testing in future. All athlete samples were processed at the Moscow Anti-Doping Laboratory accredited by the World Anti-Doping Agency.[52][53]

In the months preceding the event around 40 Russian athletes received doping bans, the most prominent of these were Darya Pishchalnikova (discus runner-up at the 2012 Summer Olympics) and Olga Kuzenkova (former Olympic and world champion in the hammer throw). The Russian Athletics Federation president Valentin Balakhnichev defended the bans as proof of the increasing effectiveness of RUSADA (the Russian Anti-Doping Agency) which had been formed three years before.[54] According to the New York Times, Pishchalnikova was a whistleblower who sent the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) a December 2012 email detailing state-run doping programs in which Russian athletes had to participate; her ban by the Russian Athletics Federation was likely in retaliation.[55]

A month before the competition The Mail on Sunday, a British newspaper, carried out an investigation and published the fact that the head of the Moscow Anti-Doping Laboratory, Grigory Rodchenkov,[56] had been arrested on charges of drug distribution, but the case against him had been dropped. His sister was convicted of purchasing banned drugs with the intention to supply them to athletes. Former Russian coach Oleg Popov and 400 metres runner Valentin Kruglyakov stated that athletes were ordered to dope and paid officials to conceal their positive tests,[57] the coach of the national athletics team, Valentin Maslakov, noted that Kruglyakov had tested positive for drugs and that Popov coached Lada Chernova, who had twice tested positive. He also stated that RUSADA and its labs were independent from the national sports federations,[58] on 18 November 2015, WADA suspended laboratory of RUSADA – Moscow Anti-Doping Laboratory, however the organization was not dissolved and tests are to be done by other independent labs.[59]

In February 2016, two high-ranking directors of the organisation — Vyacheslav Sinyev and Nikita Kamayev — died.[60] According to Sunday Times, Kamayev approached the news agency shortly before his death planning to publish a book on "the true story of sport pharmacology and doping in Russia since 1987".[61]

Outside of Russia, three of the world's top sprinters had positive tests during the buildup: Asafa Powell, Tyson Gay and Veronica Campbell-Brown.[62]

The drug testing results from the competition revealed several athletes had been using performance-enhancing drugs, the fifth-place finisher in the men's javelin, Roman Avramenko of Ukraine, tested positive for 4-Chlorodehydromethyltestosterone (a steroid), as did Turkmenistan's Yelena Ryabova (a competitor in the women's 200 m). Another 200 m runner, Yelyzaveta Bryzgina, also of Ukraine, was banned for the steroid drostanolone. Afghan 100 m runner Masoud Azizi had nandrolone in his sample. Two athletes in the walking events, Ayman Kozhakhmetova and Ebrahim Rahimian, failed their tests for EPO, as did Guatemala's marathon runner Jeremias Saloj.[63]

Russian doping scandal[edit]

Media attention began growing in December 2014 when German broadcaster ARD reported on state-sponsored doping in Russia, comparing it to doping in East Germany; in November 2015, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) published a report and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) suspended Russia indefinitely from world track and field events. The 335-page report, compiled following a nearly yearlong investigation by a commission led by former anti-doping agency President Dick Pound, urged the International Association of Athletics Federations to suspend Russia from competition, including the Olympics in Brazil. The report said Russia “sabotaged” the 2012 Olympics by allowing athletes who should have been banned for doping violations to compete in the London Games, it recommended the anti-doping agency impose lifetime suspensions for 10 Russian coaches and athletes, including women’s 800-meters gold medalist Mariya Savinova.[64] The United Kingdom Anti-Doping agency later assisted WADA with testing in Russia; in June 2016, they reported that they were unable to fully carry out their work and noted intimidation by armed Federal Security Service (FSB) agents.[65]

After a Russian former lab director made allegations about the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, WADA commissioned an independent investigation led by Richard McLaren. McLaren's investigation found corroborating evidence, concluding in a report published in July 2016 that the Ministry of Sport and the FSB had operated a "state-directed failsafe system" using a "disappearing positive [test] methodology" (DPM) from "at least late 2011 to August 2015".[66]

Athlete desertion[edit]

Orlando Ortega, a Cuban athlete who competes in the 110 metres hurdles deserted his national delegation during the championships and did not return to Cuba at its conclusion.[67] Ortega had received a six-month ban from the Cuban Athletics Federation earlier in the season for unspecified disciplinary reasons. Valentin Balakhnichev, the president of the Russian Athletics Federation, stated that he had had no contact from the athlete and in any case the federation was not looking to recruit him.[68]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Two bronze medals were awarded in women's high jump.
  2. ^ Several sources misidentified the pictures of Gushchina as fellow relay medallist Tatyana Firova.[46][47]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]