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Administrative divisions of the Republic of Tatarstan

This is a list of units of administrative division of the Republic of Tatarstan, a federal subject of Russia. Tatarstan is located in the center of the East European Plain, between the Volga and the Kama Rivers, stretching east towards the Ural Mountains, it was established as the Tatar ASSR within the Russian SFSR on May 27, 1920 from Kazansky, Mamadyshsky, Tetyushinsky and Spassky Uyezds of the former Kazan Governorate, Yelabuzhsky Uyezd of Ufa Governorate, as well as the part of Simbirsk and Vyatka Governorates. In 1922, Yelabuga with environs was transferred to the Tatar ASSR from Vyatka Governorate; the territory of the ASSR was divided into ten kantons - Sviyazhsk, Buinsk, Chistopol, Bugulma, Arsk and Mamadysh. On the territories transferred to the Tatar ASSR in 1922, Yelabuga and Agryz kantons were established, while Chelny Kanton was separated from Menzelinsk Kanton. All kantons had the same borders and the territory as the uyezds which preceded them, preserved the division into volosts.

In the 1930s, kantons were abolished and replaced with forty-five districts. In 1935, they were broken down into smaller units. By 1940, the number of districts increased to forty-three and peaked at seventy in 1944–1955. By 1957, the number of districts decreased to sixty-three. During the 1960s, some of the districts were merged, their number diminished to thirty-seven. Only some of them were broken into smaller units again; the number of districts stabilized at forty-three after Atninsky District was split from Arsky District in 1990. In 1952–1953, the Tatar ASSR was administratively divided into three oblasts—Bugulma and Kazan Oblast, but due to the oblasts' small sizes they were abolished in 1954. On August 30, 1990, the Tatar ASSR became the first one to be elevated in status as a republic within the Russian SFSR, becoming the Republic of Tatarstan. Kazan city districts: Aviastroitelny Kirovsky Moskovsky Novo-Savinovsky Privolzhsky Sovetsky Vakhitovsky Almetyevsk Aznakayevo Bavly Bugulma Buinsk Chistopol Leninogorsk Naberezhnye Chelny Nizhnekamsk Nurlat Yelabuga Zainsk Zelenodolsk Agryzsky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Agryz Aksubayevsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Aksubayevo Aktanyshsky Alexeyevsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Alexeyevskoye Alkeyevsky Almetyevsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Nizhnyaya Maktama Apastovsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Apastovo Arsky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Arsk Atninsky Aznakayevsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Aktyubinsky Baltasinsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Baltasi Bavlinsky Bugulminsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Karabash Buinsky Cheremshansky Chistopolsky Drozhzhanovsky Kamsko-Ustyinsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Kamskoye Ustye Kuybyshevsky Zaton Tenishevo Kaybitsky Kukmorsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Kukmor Laishevsky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Laishevo Leninogorsky Mamadyshsky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Mamadysh Mendeleyevsky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Mendeleyevsk Menzelinsky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Menzelinsk Muslyumovsky Nizhnekamsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Kamskiye Polyany Novosheshminsky Nurlatsky Pestrechinsky Rybno-Slobodsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Rybnaya Sloboda Sabinsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Bogatye Saby Sarmanovsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Dzhalil Spassky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Bolgar Tetyushsky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Tetyushi Tukayevsky Tyulyachinsky Verkhneuslonsky Towns under the district's jurisdiction: Innopolis Vysokogorsky Yelabuzhsky Yutazinsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Urussu Zainsky Zelenodolsky Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction: Nizhniye Vyazovye Vasilyevo

Ben Chasny

Ben Chasny is an indie rock and psychedelic folk guitarist. His primary projects are Six Organs of Comets on Fire. Chasny made his recording debut in 1996 with his heavy, free rock project Plague Lounge on The Wicker Image, an LP released conjointly between the New World of Sound and Holy Mountain labels. Holy Mountain went on to become the "home" of many of his releases under the Six Organs Of Admittance moniker, he has released an album with Hiroyuki Usui under the name August Born. Chasny has lent his talents to other projects such as Badgerlore, Double Leopards, Current 93 and Magik Markers both in live performance and studio albums. More recent musical projects of his include the avant-folk trio Rangda and the more melodic and conventional 200 Years with Magik Markers' Elisa Ambrogio; the Wicker Image Homecoming King - An Interview with Ben Chasny Set of Six Organs of Admittance at scheduletwo.com

DADIU

DADIU founded in 2005 is an academy located in Copenhagen and Aalborg in Denmark that educates students in the creation of computer games. The DADIU program is a collaboration between different universities and art schools in Denmark; the DADIU program is a specialisation and educates future game developers in different fields of computer game development and video game development. The students participating in DADIU come from universities and art schools in Denmark but are taught a joint curriculum; the DADIU programme is a full-time semester. Every fall semester DADIU accepts about 100 students to the program out of the many students who apply each year; the DADIU program contains both lectures and game productions. During the three game productions with are the most important part of the DADIU program the students are divided into six teams which function as six real game studios; the students are accepted into a specific competence as part of the DADIU program. Every fall semester the DADIU accepted six Game designers, six Game directors, six Project managers, six Level designers, six Audio designers, six Art directors, a number of Game Programmers, CG Artists, QA & UX Managers, Visual designers, Animators into the program.

The students thus complete their ongoing studies but receive a diploma certifying to the industry that they have completed the training at the Academy. The students participating in DADIU come from the following art schools and universities which are all members of the DADIU program: Aalborg University Aarhus University IT University of Copenhagen Technical University of Denmark The National Film School of Denmark The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts - Schools of Architecture and Conservation TRUEMAX Academy University of Copenhagen VIA University College Game Changer Space Bears Uprise Spoken Blobbers Clockwork Dream The following games have been produced in connection with the DADIU program in 2014: Dragon Journey Let's Raid Scouts Wonder Wool Greedy Grablins Cloud The following games have been produced in connection with the DADIU program in 2013: My Fear and I Sun Towers Saviour of Asgard Punish Panda A Darker Shade of Red The Printer Guy The following games have been produced in connection with the DADIU program in 2012: Horizon Trail of Regret Hotah Cantrip Ion Little Barker The following games have been produced in connection with the DADIU program in 2011: Back to Bed Wake Up Clone A Mother's Inferno Distorpia Blackwell Hell Driver The DADIU Greenhouse program functions as a pre-incubator program for former DADIU students and team who want to publish their games commercially and start a real game business or game studio.

The DADIU Greenhouse program help former DADIU students and team half a year. The DADIU Greenhouse program provides meetings with experts from the games industry; this mentors and experts helps and advice the former DADIU students and team on business, finance, access to market, resource management, PR. Some of the award-winning games made by the students are: Back to Bed - SpilPrisen 2015 - The Jury's Special Mention Blendimals- SpilPrisen 2015 - The Showcase award DADIU's site

Bzenica, Slovakia

Bzenica is a village and municipality in Žiar nad Hronom District in the Banská Bystrica Region of central Slovakia. The village was first mentioned in old charters in 1326 as belonging to Levice feudatories. In the 16th century it passed after to Banská Štiavnica. In the 16th century it belonged to noble families: Dóczy and Zobony. In 1601 it passed to Šašov. Andrej Kmeť, scientist The records for genealogical research are available at the state archive "Statny Archiv in Banska Bystrica, Slovakia" Roman Catholic church records: 1798-1905 Lutheran church records: 1812-1895 List of municipalities and towns in Slovakia http://www.e-obce.sk/obec/bzenica/bzenica.html Surnames of living people in Bzenica

Mitch MacDonald

Mitch MacDonald is a Canadian singer, runner-up in season 6 of the reality series Canadian Idol. MacDonald is from Nova Scotia on Cape Breton Island, he grew up in a family of seven siblings. He worked as a carpenter before Idol, he cites his musical influences as including fellow Cape Bretoner Gordie Sampson. Bright Eyes is one of his favourite bands. On Canadian Idol in 2008, MacDonald worked with such artists as Anne Murray, Simple Plan, Gavin Rossdale, Tom Jones. During his run on Idol, he never appeared in the "bottom two" or "bottom three". Music writer Martha Worboy described MacDonald's music as "tender acoustic renderings." He received accolades in particular for his rendition of Joel Plaskett's "Love This Town", which drew comparisons to Paul Simon from the judges. Nova Scotia Premier Rodney MacDonald, a musician himself before entering politics, said, "The key to his success throughout the contest was that he remained true to his musical roots." MacDonald toured Canada as part of the Top 3 Tour, with Theo Tams, Drew Wright.

As of 2010, he continued to tour both in his home province and in other parts of Canada, he started work on an album

Iceberg B-15

Iceberg B-15 was the world's largest recorded iceberg. It measured around 295 kilometres long and 37 kilometres wide, with a surface area of 11,000 square kilometres —larger than the whole island of Jamaica. Calved from the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica in March 2000, Iceberg B-15 broke up into smaller icebergs, the largest of, named Iceberg B-15A. In 2003, B-15A drifted away from Ross Island into the Ross Sea and headed north breaking up into several smaller icebergs in October 2005; as of 2018, a large piece of the original iceberg was moving northward, located between the Falkland Islands and South Georgia Island. In the last weeks of March 2000, Iceberg B-15 calved from the Ross Ice Shelf near Roosevelt Island, Antarctica; the calving occurred along pre-existing cracks in the ice shelf. The iceberg measured around 295 kilometres long and 37 kilometres wide, with a surface area of 10,915 square kilometres —nearly as large as the island of Jamaica. Scientists believe that the enormous piece of ice broke away as part of a long-term natural cycle, which occurs every fifty to one hundred years.

In 2000, 2002, 2003, Iceberg B-15 broke up into several pieces, the largest of which, B-15A, covered 6,400 square kilometres of the sea surface. In November 2003, after the separation from B-15J, B-15A drifted away from Ross Island on the open waters of the Ross Sea. In December 2003, a small knife-shaped iceberg, B-15K, detached itself from the main body of B-15A and started drifting northward. By January 2005, prevailing currents caused B-15A to drift toward the Drygalski Ice Tongue, a 70-kilometre long extension of the land-based David Glacier, which flows through the coastal mountains of Victoria Land. A few kilometres from the ice tongue, the iceberg became stranded on a shallow seamount before resuming its northward course. On 10 April 2005, B-15A collided with the ice tongue. Iceberg B-15A continued to drift along the coast leaving McMurdo Sound. On 27–28 October 2005, the iceberg ran aground off Cape Adare in Victoria Land and broke into several smaller pieces, generating seismic signals that were detected as far away as the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station the largest of, still named B-15A.

Three additional pieces were named B-15P, B-15M, B-15N. Iceberg B-15A moved farther up north and broke up into more pieces; these were spotted by air force fisheries patrol on 3 November 2006. On 21 November 2006 several large pieces were seen just 60 km off the coast of Timaru, New Zealand—the largest measured about 18 kilometres, rising 37 metres from the surface of the ocean; as of 2018, four pieces remain. One piece, B-15Z, measures 10 nautical miles by 5 nautical miles, it was located in the southern Atlantic ocean, about 150 nautical miles northwest of South Georgia Island. As it continues its move northward, the speed of melt increases. Most icebergs do not last long this far north. On 29 January 2001, researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of Wisconsin installed weather and Global Positioning System instruments on Iceberg B-15A, it was the first time. The data gathered led to an unprecedented understanding of how giant icebergs make their way through the waters of Antarctica and beyond.

Iceberg B-15A collided with the Drygalski Ice Tongue on 10 April 2005, breaking off an 8-square-kilometre section of the ice tongue. Antarctic maps needed to be redrawn. B-15A prevented ocean currents and winds from assisting in the 2004–2005 summer break-up of the sea ice in McMurdo Sound, was an obstacle to the annual resupply ships to three research stations; the floe was expected to cause a catastrophic decline in the population of Adélie penguins, as it added considerable distances which parent penguins must travel back from the sea to their chicks. Weddell seals and Skuas are inhabitants of McMurdo Sound and their populations may have been affected as well. In October 2006, a study showed that a large storm in the Gulf of Alaska generated a trans-Pacific ocean swell that may have contributed to breaking B15-A into many pieces on 27 October 2005; the swell travelled 13,500 kilometres from Alaska to Antarctica over six days. Scientists are studying this event as an example of how weather in one area can have effects in other parts of the world, with concern over the effects on global warming.

A more detailed study in 2010, shows that the iceberg breakup was principally caused by repeated grounding with near-coastal bathymetry near Cape Adare, Victoria Land. List of recorded icebergs by area McMurdo Sound Encounters at the End of the World, a Werner Herzog documentary which contains some footage of B-15 Stone, Gregory S.. Ice island: expedition to Antarctica's largest iceberg. Boston, Massachusetts: New England Aquarium Press, National Geographic Society. ISBN 1593730179. OCLC 52739140. ESA: Situation Around Balleby Islands.